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(Popular Science)   Six things grosser than horse meat in your burger   (popsci.com) divider line 141
    More: Sick, horse meat  
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17725 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Feb 2013 at 2:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-28 02:31:28 PM

LarryDan43: Eating cute animals is frowned upon!


Sorry, Ponies are assholes and deserve to be eaten
 
2013-02-28 02:31:41 PM
Grrr KFH.

/think the Horse Super Poop Germ Slime is starting to affect my brain
 
2013-02-28 02:33:58 PM

MyKingdomForYourHorse: LarryDan43: Eating cute animals is frowned upon!

Sorry, Ponies are assholes and deserve to be eaten


images3.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2013-02-28 02:35:06 PM

deanis: fredklein:
Note that in reality "any connective tissue, cartilage, and other pieces that may incidentally accompany the trimmings" are removed, while the "article" says "Euphemistically referred to as the "trimmings," the leftover waste products from beef processing include fat, sinew, bloody effluvia, and bits of meat."

It's just another scare piece, short on fact, long on ohmyfarkinggodyouregonnadieunlessyoureadthisnow!!!!11!

DO NOT WANT


Yeah, it's not like there's naturally any blood in meat. Animal muscle tissue is completely devoid of blood. ::rolleyes::
 
2013-02-28 02:35:49 PM
I have never gotten a horse to go where I tell it to, so making burgers out of them seems like a win.
 
2013-02-28 02:36:48 PM
After reading some of the comments, I decided to click the link. As detestable as I find slideshows, I had to bite my lip to keep from laughing out loud.
 
2013-02-28 02:37:16 PM

msupf: Meh, been grinding my own burger meat for years. Cheaper and tastier than store bought every time.


See, I'd be willing to try this except Costco (which doesn't use 'pink slime') sells ground beef for < $3/lb (88% lean) and I can't find a steak or roast for that cheap except if shopping the sales. So I believe tastier, but I'm not sure cheaper applies in my area.
 
2013-02-28 02:37:42 PM
Even if everyone knew exactly what species of meat was in a burger, fat, lazy America would still shovel them in.
 
2013-02-28 02:37:46 PM
Horses are pretty f**kin' stupid. Not as stupid as cows but pretty-damn close.
If a little clop-clop made its way into my moo patty I'd think I could live with it.
Let's be realistic - we North 'merikuns have been munching down on chemically-altered dog-sh*t for all we know.

The food industry: don't ask us any questions and we'll tell you no lies.
 
2013-02-28 02:38:05 PM

walkerhound: LOL

[www.popsci.com image 525x393]


I'm done here.
 
2013-02-28 02:38:53 PM
McDonalds tried making a burger with horse lips . . . They called it the McJager.

/Old humor is still humor . . .
 
2013-02-28 02:39:34 PM
What if you had a sandwich made out of cow lips? Like, still intact. And every bite you took, it looked like you were kissing your sandwich.
A lip sandwich.
 
2013-02-28 02:44:28 PM

Tanthalas39: chrisco123: Meat is murder.

Someone needs a dictionary.


I believe the proper response was...

Tasty, tasty murder.
 
2013-02-28 02:45:48 PM
A tampon in your tomato soup?
 
2013-02-28 02:46:02 PM
Findinag a used condom in my burger, yep, that would be worse.
 
2013-02-28 02:47:29 PM

fredklein: deanis: fredklein:
Note that in reality "any connective tissue, cartilage, and other pieces that may incidentally accompany the trimmings" are removed, while the "article" says "Euphemistically referred to as the "trimmings," the leftover waste products from beef processing include fat, sinew, bloody effluvia, and bits of meat."

It's just another scare piece, short on fact, long on ohmyfarkinggodyouregonnadieunlessyoureadthisnow!!!!11!

DO NOT WANT

Yeah, it's not like there's naturally any blood in meat. Animal muscle tissue is completely devoid of blood. ::rolleyes::


Roll your eyes somewhere else not-funny man.
 
2013-02-28 02:48:43 PM

walkerhound: LOL

[www.popsci.com image 525x393]


That's the only good picture, if you're making a slideshow why shiat up the slideshow part?
 
2013-02-28 02:49:08 PM

St_Francis_P: What's wrong with horse meat?


Nothing.  Unless I tell you it's beef.
 
2013-02-28 02:49:39 PM
brightlightsfilm.com
 
2013-02-28 02:50:08 PM

dv-ous: walkerhound: LOL

[www.popsci.com image 525x393]

I'm done here.


Yep. The article was only 6 images so I actually clicked through the slide show. That image made it worth the extra clicks to me.
 
2013-02-28 02:50:53 PM
The meat of 144 horses in your burger?
 
2013-02-28 02:52:27 PM

meat0918: This is why I buy a roast and grind the meat myself.

I can't remember the last time I bought ground beef from the supermarket





Have been wanting to do this more and more. I find it hard to trust anything that goes through machinery I have no control over. Grinder ideas/tips appreciated!
 
2013-02-28 02:53:24 PM
TFA reminds me our local farmers market meets today. Need to go see what's fresh.
 
2013-02-28 02:55:34 PM

fredklein: notthisshiatagain.jpg

Re: "pink slime": Firstly they had the wrong picture posted, and had to take it down, then they say "BPI's Jeremy Jacobsen also claimed that "the language used to describe how it's made and what it's made from are 100% completely false," but did not provide any further details", while linking to a couple of sites which,if they had actually bothered to read them, provide just the answer they are looking for:

When beef carcasses are portioned the pieces that are cut off ("beef trimmings") often have lean meat remaining with them. These USDA inspected beef trimmings are refrigerated and sent to LFTB producers. Similar to standard ground beef processes, the trimmings are sent to specialized machinery which removes any connective tissue, cartilage, and other pieces that may incidentally accompany the trimmings. To separate the fat from the lean meat the trimmings are warmed to the temperature they were prior to refrigeration (105°F) using equipment designed to evenly temper the trimmings. The trimmings are then sent to a centrifuge where the fat is removed using centrifugal force. The lean meat which is now 94% to 97% lean, is then frozen and packaged. The process used to make LFTB is similar to the one used to separate cream from milk and a variety of other everyday foods.

Note that in reality "any connective tissue, cartilage, and other pieces that may incidentally accompany the trimmings" are removed, while the "article" says "Euphemistically referred to as the "trimmings," the leftover waste products from beef processing include fat, sinew, bloody effluvia, and bits of meat."

It's just another scare piece, short on fact, long on ohmyfarkinggodyouregonnadieunlessyoureadthisnow!!!!11!


People don't understand the pink slime controversy.  You are right, there is nothing dangerous in pink slime that would make you sick compared to normal meat.  People who say that are full of s**t.

However, pink slime is a fraud, if you buy it and think you are buying ground beef.  It is mostly collagen, low in nutrients and flavor, and mostly melts off when you cook the meat anyways (ever wonder what all that liquid is that comes off your ground beef and is not fat)?

So yea, I'm damn glad the pink slime thing blew up and they stopped using it.  Why should i pay the same price for a vastly inferior product that I'm not even being made aware of?
 
2013-02-28 02:56:18 PM

kid_icarus: I personally wouldn't mind seeing #6 (The Thousand Animal Burger) on a menu.


Sounds like a great menu item!
 
2013-02-28 02:57:00 PM
Missing the point of horse meat scandal.

1) You're paying for one thing and getting something else.

Places like South Africa have found pork in their beef... obviously a problem with some religions.

Can you imagine buying a Mercedes and the car dealership giving you a POS Fiat?

2) Health

These horses have been snuck in to the food. They are not farm raised and contain powerful race horse pain killers that are known to be damaging to human health.


Yes... there is an *ew gross I don't eat that* factor to it... but that's not the worst offense by far.
 
2013-02-28 02:57:59 PM

Bondith: The meat of 144 horses in your burger?


A whole herd - running wild in some prairie landscape with their manes flowing and glistening in the sun - then getting culled into meat for a glorious hamburger just for me!
 
2013-02-28 03:00:41 PM

CheekyMonkey: LarryDan43: St_Francis_P: What's wrong with horse meat?

Eating cute animals is frowned upon!

Pigs are pretty damn cute.


blogs.seattleweekly.com

: Want some bacon?
: No man, I don't eat pork.
: Are you Jewish?
: Nah, I ain't Jewish, I just don't dig on swine, that's all.
: Why not?
: Pigs are filthy animals. I don't eat filthy animals.
: Bacon tastes gooood. Pork chops taste gooood.
: Hey, sewer rat may taste like pumpkin pie, but I'd never know 'cause I wouldn't eat the filthy motherfarker. Pigs sleep and root in shiat. That's a filthy animal. I ain't eat nothin' that ain't got sense enough to disregard its own feces.
: How about a dog? Dogs eats its own feces.
: I don't eat dog either.
: Yeah, but do you consider a dog to be a filthy animal?
: I wouldn't go so far as to call a dog filthy but they're definitely dirty. But, a dog's got personality. Personality goes a long way.
: Ah, so by that rationale, if a pig had a better personality, he would cease to be a filthy animal. Is that true?
: Well we'd have to be talkin' about one charming motherf*ckin' pig. I mean he'd have to be ten times more charmin' than that Arnold on Green Acres, you know what I'm sayin'?
 
2013-02-28 03:00:43 PM

Gig103: msupf: Meh, been grinding my own burger meat for years. Cheaper and tastier than store bought every time.

See, I'd be willing to try this except Costco (which doesn't use 'pink slime') sells ground beef for < $3/lb (88% lean) and I can't find a steak or roast for that cheap except if shopping the sales. So I believe tastier, but I'm not sure cheaper applies in my area.


Really depends on what you use for the grind mixture. Lots of people say use good sirloin or strip steaks. That's a waste of good beef. At best, you want trimmings from these.


Find flat steak and make sure its flat steak. It's from the bottom of the rib. It'll look coarse with very noticeable muscle fibers. It's similar to a skirt steak, but not. You will get great beef flavor out of this for very little cost. Beyond that, chuck roast or round roast with a good deal of solid fat is a good pairing if you have a grinder. Nice thing is, stores like Kroger often have BOGO sales on various roast cuts, so you can save a ton that way.



Fancy people don't like to say it, but using high quality sirloin or short rib cuts to make burgers is a waste because you still have to add fat which is what really adds that juiciness and flavor to a good burger, and the texture of cheaper cuts is the same when ground. Then again, if I had a Costco in closer proximity, I'd likely buy their ground beef as well as make my own.

 
2013-02-28 03:04:16 PM
Fur?
 
2013-02-28 03:04:24 PM
Step 1: Cut a hole in the burger
Step 2: ....
Step 3: Give her the burger
 
2013-02-28 03:05:15 PM

Altman: However, pink slime is a fraud, if you buy it and think you are buying ground beef. It is mostly collagen, low in nutrients and flavor, and mostly melts off when you cook the meat anyways (ever wonder what all that liquid is that comes off your ground beef and is not fat)?


Cite?

Because I've posted mine.

When beef carcasses are portioned the pieces that are cut off ("beef trimmings") often have lean meat remaining with them. These USDA inspected beef trimmings are refrigerated and sent to LFTB producers. Similar to standard ground beef processes, the trimmings are sent to specialized machinery which removes any connective tissue, cartilage, and other pieces that may incidentally accompany the trimmings. To separate the fat from the lean meat the trimmings are warmed to the temperature they were prior to refrigeration (105°F) using equipment designed to evenly temper the trimmings. The trimmings are then sent to a centrifuge where the fat is removed using centrifugal force. The lean meat which is now 94% to 97% lean, is then frozen and packaged. The process used to make LFTB is similar to the one used to separate cream from milk and a variety of other everyday foods.- http://www.beefisbeef.com/faq-3/
 
2013-02-28 03:10:25 PM

St_Francis_P: What's wrong with horse meat?




There is nothing wrong with horse meat. There is, however, something very wrong in paying for cow beef and getting meat from any species other than cow.
And if the supplyiers can't even get the animal species right, what else is mixed up with the meat?

That's what's wrong with this horse meat issue.
 
2013-02-28 03:13:47 PM
And none of that is as frightening as the mayo.
 
2013-02-28 03:15:17 PM

fredklein: Altman: However, pink slime is a fraud, if you buy it and think you are buying ground beef. It is mostly collagen, low in nutrients and flavor, and mostly melts off when you cook the meat anyways (ever wonder what all that liquid is that comes off your ground beef and is not fat)?

Cite?

Because I've posted mine.

When beef carcasses are portioned the pieces that are cut off ("beef trimmings") often have lean meat remaining with them. These USDA inspected beef trimmings are refrigerated and sent to LFTB producers. Similar to standard ground beef processes, the trimmings are sent to specialized machinery which removes any connective tissue, cartilage, and other pieces that may incidentally accompany the trimmings. To separate the fat from the lean meat the trimmings are warmed to the temperature they were prior to refrigeration (105°F) using equipment designed to evenly temper the trimmings. The trimmings are then sent to a centrifuge where the fat is removed using centrifugal force. The lean meat which is now 94% to 97% lean, is then frozen and packaged. The process used to make LFTB is similar to the one used to separate cream from milk and a variety of other everyday foods.- http://www.beefisbeef.com/faq-3/


Your quote is from a website that is "Sponsored by Beef Products, Inc."  Isn't that cute and unbiased.

From Scientific American (http://blogs.scientificamerican.com/guest-blog/2012/03/27/pink-slime -d econstructed/ )

"But, is it nutritious? Consumers can certainly make valid arguments regarding LFTB's content: there's less overall "functional" protein than that found in other meat products. An analysis conducted at Iowa State University (<a data-cke-saved-href="http://www.exnet.iastate.edu/Pages/ansci/beefrepo rts/asl-1361.pdf" target="_blank">A.S. Leaflet R1361) found two-and-a-half times more insoluble protein (77% vs. 30%) relative to soluble proteins in ordinary ground chuck. Nutritionally, our gut bacteria digest much of what we cannot, but there's a good bet that we can't get as much value from insoluble proteins (collagen and elastin, found largely in tendons, ligaments, and cartilage) as from their soluble siblings (myosin and actin, usually associated with muscle tissues). While these proteins may be hard to digest, on the plus side, there's less fat in LFTB (~5%) than standard ground chuck (15-20%). "

Sure sounds like fraud to me, if I'm paying for ground cow meat.
 
2013-02-28 03:15:32 PM

Mr.Hawk: meat0918: This is why I buy a roast and grind the meat myself.

I can't remember the last time I bought ground beef from the supermarket

Have been wanting to do this more and more. I find it hard to trust anything that goes through machinery I have no control over. Grinder ideas/tips appreciated!


See my other posts for some tips on what meats to use, and an alternative (albeit slower) to a grinder for some wanting to try it out.

If you do want to grind, stay away from manual models. Too much waste, for every pound you put in you might get at best 1/2 pound of ground meat. If you have a stand mixer and want to get the grinding attachments (kitchenaid is ~$50) you want to make sure you have a higher end model mixer. Something with a 250-300 watt motor will not grind as easily or as well as a higher end model with a 450-500 watt motor. But, all will produce a lot less waste than the manual models. A dedicated grinder is best, and will do the best with cuts that still have tough connective tissue or sinew in them. Waring Pro makes a good one in the $200 range. And like I said in other posts, a good food processor can do duty as a grinder for people who do it occasionally.
 
2013-02-28 03:15:47 PM

fredklein: http://www.beefisbeef.com/faq-3/


Site Sponsored by Beef Products, Inc.

/reputable source ya got there
 
2013-02-28 03:18:53 PM
30 seconds, Altman.

/shakes tiny fist
 
2013-02-28 03:20:39 PM

mdeesnuts: 30 seconds, Altman.

/shakes tiny fist


Hey, good find nonetheless.  I loves me some fact checkers on Fark.
 
2013-02-28 03:21:45 PM
As long as they don't try and give me horse Pepsi, we're cool.
 
2013-02-28 03:21:55 PM

chrisco123: Do you know how animals die?


Their brains stop receiving oxygen.
 
2013-02-28 03:30:31 PM

fredklein: blatz514: GASP!

[www.popsci.com image 525x350]

Pink Slime

The thing is, they refused to actually post the correct pic, and only linked to it in the parenthetical note at the bottom.


They refused to run the pic provided by BPI. It could be that they didn't consider the company an unbiased source of information about itself.
 
2013-02-28 03:34:21 PM
My first car was an '89 caddilac sedan deville.  The speedometer only went up to 85.  It would go much faster than that.
 
2013-02-28 03:35:21 PM

chrisco123: Meat is murder.


What about soylent trollburger?
 
2013-02-28 03:36:06 PM
oops wrong thread
 
2013-02-28 03:39:58 PM
How many PETA members does it take to change a lightbulb?


None.

PETA can't change anything.

- Thanks! I'll be here all week!
 
2013-02-28 03:43:20 PM
/msupf: Meh, been grinding my own burger meat for years. Cheaper and tastier than store bought every time.

If you don't have or can't afford a good grinder, cube the meat into 1-inch chunks and freeze until it is still slightly mushy in the middle. Pulse in a food processor in 1/4 pound batches. If making burgers, a touch of kosher salt with each batch helps with the grind. You want chunks of about 1/8 inch or slightly larger in size.

If you don't have enough fat, some melted butter mixed in makes up for it. Thoroughly mix meat and butter together and refrigerate to let butter solidify somewhat before cooking, as well as to let it soak up some of the beef juices.


This.  Doin' my own meat since, well . . .

/Come at me, bro.  Someone has to play straight man.
 
2013-02-28 03:45:23 PM

Altman: Your quote is from a website that is "Sponsored by Beef Products, Inc." Isn't that cute and unbiased.


Yes, it is. Because if they lied, and it was found out, they'd all be out of a job overnight. Look at what happened to the few companies that produced "pink slime" -most went out of business. You think the companies that produce Ground Beef want the same to happen to all of them?

Now, with that said, do they 'spin' the facts to make them sound less gross? Sure. Everyone does. That's why you buy "natural honey" instead of "bee barf", "maple syrup" instead of "tree blood", or a bunch of 'flowers' rather than "an arrangement of cut off reproductive organs of plants".

Altman: From Scientific American

From Scientific American


You mean from blogs.scientificamerican.com. Anyone can blog.

And that blog differs from the beefisbeef description (which, as I just showed, is more likely to be correct- the Meat Industry ('Big Meat'?) has a lot more to lose than some blogger) in a few ways:

Big Meat: "the trimmings are sent to specialized machinery which removes any connective tissue, cartilage, and other pieces that may incidentally accompany the trimmings"

Blogger: "Connective tissue, trimmings, and scraps from industrial butcher plants are mixed in a large steel reactor" (Note the use of the 'scare word' "reactor". Talk about bias.)

Blogger: "Ammonium hydroxide - ammonia dissolved partially in water - sterilizes the resulting mass" [makes it sound like they soak it in Windex. Bias again.]

Big Meat: "Ammonium hydroxide is created by applying a tiny amount of ammonia in the form of a puff of gas. This raises the pH level in the beef helping to kill any harmful pathogens"..."Ammonia is naturally found in all beef, other proteins, and virtually all foods and has been declared safe by the Food and Drug Administration for use in food processing since 1974. Ammonia, in its many forms, is widely used in the processing of numerous foods, such as baked goods, cheeses, chocolates, caramels, and puddings."

So.. yeah.
 
2013-02-28 03:47:02 PM

mdeesnuts: fredklein: http://www.beefisbeef.com/faq-3/

Site Sponsored by Beef Products, Inc.

/reputable source ya got there


Yes it is. If they get caught lying, they'll be out of a job. And, after the 'pink slime' debacle, there were plenty of reporters looking at the meat industry pretty closely.
 
2013-02-28 03:49:12 PM

MikeBoomshadow: They refused to run the pic provided by BPI. It could be that they didn't consider the company an unbiased source of information about itself.


Then why link to it at all??
 
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