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(Ars Technica)   How Stuxnet worked. A nasty little bug   (arstechnica.com) divider line 19
    More: Cool, Stuxnet, Iran, encryption key, computer worm, Kaspersky Labs, Kim Zetter, network operator, fires  
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4228 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Feb 2013 at 10:09 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-28 10:23:08 AM
It's a good thing this technology could never spread and end up being used against US infrastructure.
 
2013-02-28 10:33:10 AM

Marcus Aurelius: It's a good thing this technology could never spread and end up being used against US infrastructure.


Ha. Yeah, that's kind of scary. Although now that these are out in the open, I wonder if the vulnerabilities they were exploiting have been patched? It's always going to be a moving target. I bet they are working on stuff 2 or 3 generations past what has come to light so far.
 
2013-02-28 10:41:59 AM
Both interesting and terrifying.
Especially because while I'm convinced the US will have the best Tanks in the world for the next 20 years, I'm not convinced we will have the best hackers in the world.
 
2013-02-28 11:37:41 AM
Hopefully this, or something equally advanced, will be used against us. It would be better now to have a dramatic incident so proper security on important systems can be established. Keep in mind, these systems as Stuxnet has shown don't even need to be connected to the 'net to get infected thanks to USB drives and the like.

We have been far to lackadaisical in this country in regards to network security.
 
2013-02-28 11:53:18 AM

milsorgen: Hopefully this, or something equally advanced, will be used against us. It would be better now to have a dramatic incident so proper security on important systems can be established. Keep in mind, these systems as Stuxnet has shown don't even need to be connected to the 'net to get infected thanks to USB drives and the like.

We have been far to lackadaisical in this country in regards to network security.


Are you hoping for a major rail disaster, or are you holding out for a nuclear plant explosion?
 
2013-02-28 12:13:56 PM
Confession time: since I read all my news, I know everything about this except for how to pronounce it.  Is it "stewnet" or stucksnet"?
 
2013-02-28 01:16:06 PM

PanicMan: Confession time: since I read all my news, I know everything about this except for how to pronounce it.  Is it "stewnet" or stucksnet"?


Every time I've heard it pronounced, it's actually been said as a combination of the two.  "Stewksnet"
 
2013-02-28 01:43:18 PM

SniperJoe: PanicMan: Confession time: since I read all my news, I know everything about this except for how to pronounce it.  Is it "stewnet" or stucksnet"?

Every time I've heard it pronounced, it's actually been said as a combination of the two.  "Stewksnet"


I've always thought it was "stucksnet" but I'm often wrong, so it's probably "stewnet"

/or "stuznet"?  Or is "X" only "Z" at the beginning of a word?
 
2013-02-28 02:24:27 PM

OceanVortex: Both interesting and terrifying.
Especially because while I'm convinced the US will have the best Tanks in the world for the next 20 years, I'm not convinced we will have the best hackers in the world


We do have the best hackers in the world but we keep throwing them in jail.
 
2013-02-28 02:49:37 PM

shooosh: OceanVortex: Both interesting and terrifying.
Especially because while I'm convinced the US will have the best Tanks in the world for the next 20 years, I'm not convinced we will have the best hackers in the world

We do have the best hackers in the world but we keep throwing them in jail.


Or are we...?

/typing from a small, dimly lit room under heavy security
 
2013-02-28 02:53:09 PM

PanicMan: Confession time: since I read all my news, I know everything about this except for how to pronounce it.  Is it "stewnet" or stucksnet"?


I have heard "stucksnet".  But I get a lot of my news from NPR, and you know how those libs lie.
 
2013-02-28 05:43:22 PM
The best hackers don't get caug...

wait, someones at the door.
 
2013-02-28 07:25:22 PM

shooosh: OceanVortex: Both interesting and terrifying.
Especially because while I'm convinced the US will have the best Tanks in the world for the next 20 years, I'm not convinced we will have the best hackers in the world

We do have the best hackers in the world but we keep throwing them in jail.


There's a difference between running off the shelf exploits (i.e. anonymous) v.s. crafting sophisticated cyber weapons (programs like this).

Stuxnet employed not one but two zero day exploits of commercial software. That is no easy feat. A previously unknown exploit of widely used software is actually quite valuable on the black market.
 
2013-02-28 07:27:33 PM
I really wonder who coded this.....looking at you 3 letter organization.
 
2013-02-28 08:59:21 PM
It sounds like a beautiful piece of code, but heavy on the bloat.

/handcoded ASM FTW
 
2013-02-28 10:27:38 PM

milowitz: I really wonder who coded this.....looking at you 3 letter organization.


If I had to venture a guess, it would be NSA.
 
2013-03-01 12:39:52 AM

The5thElement: milowitz: I really wonder who coded this.....looking at you 3 letter organization.

If I had to venture a guess, it would be NSA.


Maybe DISA. There's also a couple of 1st tier contractors that specialize in this sort of thing.
 
2013-03-01 09:06:09 AM
I listened to a CBC story on the radio last year about this, and it was actually four zero day exploits. It also did some crazy stuff like instead of just stopping all the equipment, it let them run the enrichment equipment, but not properly, so at the end of the process everything seemed to go smoothly but the uranium was not actually enriched so it wasn't really usable (but you wouldn't know until you tested it at the end of the process).

count chocula: tuxnet employed not one but two zero day exploits of commercial software. That is no easy feat. A previously unknown exploit of widely used software is actually quite valuable on the black market.

 
2013-03-01 07:18:14 PM
As a SCADA system analyst I'm getting a kick...

Stuxnet is seriously fascinating stuff though. I read through the Symantec paper on it back in the day... really cool stuff.
 
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