If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Wired)   The Internet needs a Plan B, also needs to to stop drinking so much and waking up next to strange networks it just met   (wired.com) divider line 18
    More: Interesting, Plan B, Fortune Magazine, western United States, nuclear powers, genomics, drinking, China Telecom, Danny Hillis  
•       •       •

2270 clicks; posted to Geek » on 28 Feb 2013 at 1:17 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



18 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-02-28 01:13:36 AM
If the internet goes dark, how will I get my fix of Fark? The Fabulous Glittering Aquanazis? CUTE PENGUIN VIDEOS?

I will die without these things.
 
2013-02-28 01:24:57 AM
he's right, he makes sense, and since the wealthy won't see a quick and measurable return on investment to do this good common sense thing it probably won't come to pass. but the time will come when the shiat hits the fan and billions or trillions of commerce dollars will be lost, or much worse the loss will be measured in pain & suffering and lots of it.
 
2013-02-28 01:43:51 AM
Oh please.  We can't even get everyone to switch to IPv6, which is relatively minor change compared to what this schmuck is proposing.
 
2013-02-28 01:45:28 AM
Oh boy, Wired + TED! Fart sniffers unite!

Anyway, what a load of ancient FUD. We've known for ages that the net is not nearly as redundant as it should be. Remember that guy in the backhoe in Ohio several years ago who severed a very large internet pipe and took half the internet offline?
Pretty sure nothing much has been learned from that event, but I don't think an entirely separate network would be immune from that kind of thing either.
 
2013-02-28 01:46:21 AM
I think the gist of the idea is to stop plugging everything in.

Some things can function perfectly fine as closed systems. And to remain a closed system, all you have to do is NOT plug it in.
 
2013-02-28 01:49:51 AM
userserve-ak.last.fmuserserve-ak.last.fm
 
2013-02-28 01:59:31 AM
"Hygiene would be required," Hillis says.

We're f*cked.
 
2013-02-28 02:12:35 AM

spamdog: Oh boy, Wired + TED! Fart sniffers unite!

Anyway, what a load of ancient FUD. We've known for ages that the net is not nearly as redundant as it should be. Remember that guy in the backhoe in Ohio several years ago who severed a very large internet pipe and took half the internet offline?
Pretty sure nothing much has been learned from that event, but I don't think an entirely separate network would be immune from that kind of thing either.


No kidding:

www.blogcdn.com
 
2013-02-28 02:28:17 AM

ModernLuddite: I think the gist of the idea is to stop plugging everything in.

Some things can function perfectly fine as closed systems. And to remain a closed system, all you have to do is NOT plug it in.


The guy talked about Stuxnet. What I've read about Stuxnet said that the worm was released into the wild, infected as many computers as it could, and then infected removable media on those computers (like flashdrives) so that an Iranian scientist literally carried the worm in his pocket from an internet-connected computer to the closed systems that ran the centrifuge.

Keeping two systems separate is virtually impossible without making the two systems a) completely incompatible or b) completely locking out the closed system (like destroying USB ports).

Otherwise, you end up with "oh, I didn't realize I could give the system a virus that way, my iPhone was just low on power and I wanted to charge it."
 
2013-02-28 03:06:57 AM
How 'bout switching from copper and fiber to beer and scotch for signal transmissions? One could simply disconnect the ethernet to top off their glass.
 
2013-02-28 03:09:58 AM
The Internet is promiscuous and unreliable by design.

This accounts for its popularity.

It's not gonna change.
 
2013-02-28 05:10:35 AM

ModernLuddite: Some things can function perfectly fine as closed systems.And to remain a closed system, all you have to do is NOT plug it in.


You keep using that phrase. I don't think it means what you think it means.

<profplump> goes to fetch a couple of mirrors and lenses to hack ML's thermostat as a demonstration of how complicated it is to construct a "closed system". Eventually when ML insulates his thermostat to protect it from remote attacks he will also learn how important external communication is in most systems.
 
2013-02-28 05:57:54 AM
And while a lot of attention is paid to protecting individual computers and networked systems, no one is really focused on protecting the internet itself.

I think Jen is looking after it.
 
2013-02-28 06:16:05 AM
someguyanth.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-02-28 08:36:20 AM
If only there were some form of protocol or coding that allowed devices to detect failures and reroute traffic when needed
 
2013-02-28 09:07:55 AM

steveGswine: The Internet is promiscuous and unreliable by design.

This accounts for its popularity.

It's not gonna change.



The internet's a brazen little slut?
 
2013-02-28 12:31:33 PM

guilt by association: The internet's a brazen little slut?


BGP! BGP! BGP!
 
2013-03-01 05:04:51 PM
There is an RFC that shows how to send IP messages using alternate encoding devices, including the guns on battleships and by position of the turrets on tanks in a procession.

/can't remember the number offhand
//Written on 4/1
 
Displayed 18 of 18 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »





Report