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(Bangor Daily News)   Maine State Trooper has an accidental discharge. Fark--while 'shifting' in his seat during a staff meeting   (bangordailynews.com) divider line 71
    More: Fail, accidental discharge, Maine, Maine State Police, Stephen McCausland, seats, handguns  
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7259 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Feb 2013 at 4:00 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-28 12:37:00 AM
He said Currie's gun has been taken to the state police's armory for analysis and testing, where the department's technicians likely will try to re-create the situation that led to the discharge. The weapon's manufacturer also will be contacted and consulted.

I'm guessing one in the pipe, safety off, and a holster with insufficient trigger-guard cover.  Then, as he was "shifting", the bottom of his body armor somehow caught on the trigger and depressed it.  I'm not familiar with the HK .45, but I googled a bunch of pics of it and most of the pics showed a double-action first shot (or DAO) gun with no grip safety.

Alternatively, he could have had a holster with OK trigger coverage, but something had worked loose in that area of the holster (due to fraying or wear) and it got caught when he tried to holster it, (again with the safety off) so he had an insufficiently holstered gun with something wedged against the trigger.  Then, when he shifted, the bottom edge of his body armor (or his gut) caught the gun and pushed down on it, forcing it into the holster and pulling the trigger.
Either way, we're almost certainly talking about a gun with the safety off.

/why yes, I'm bored and waiting for the Lunesta to take effect
//why do you ask?
 
2013-02-28 12:38:23 AM
"He shifted in his seat and his firearm discharged while still in the holster."


Had that happen once,

I was young - in my teens.

Thank god for sex toys.
 
2013-02-28 01:30:23 AM
What an HK model acting on its own may have looked like
 
2013-02-28 01:32:31 AM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: What an HK model acting on its own may have looked like


images.wikia.com

There.. had to find an image that would link
 
2013-02-28 01:41:31 AM
I wonder if the other staff members at the meeting had accidental discharges of some sort at that point.
 
2013-02-28 04:03:08 AM
Oh come on. Who hasn't had that happen to them?

/dnrtfa
//I assume it has nothing to do with firearms
 
2013-02-28 04:38:38 AM
Desk pop
 
2013-02-28 04:39:46 AM
FTFA: " When asked if the safety was on, he said he didn't have any further details about specifics other than the holster was securely attached to the lieutenant's lap."

/well, there seems to be your problem officer
//derp
 
2013-02-28 04:41:28 AM
That wouldn't have happened if everyone in the room was armed.
 
2013-02-28 04:56:37 AM
Attached to his lap? Hmmmm
 
2013-02-28 05:18:14 AM
The worst thing about this story is that he didn't shoot his dick off. Way to miss an easy one, Darwin.
 
2013-02-28 05:21:25 AM
While I'm sure that the response would be that the officer was considered "on duty" and everything was kosher, I'm just as sure that no one in a computer training course needs to be sitting there with a chambered round.  Then again, this is from my home state of Maine, where there has never in it's history been a police (or game warden, or border patrol, or whoever in the state can carry a loaded weapon without a CCP nowadays) shooting ruled to be unjustified.

/Im going to guess that everyone else in the room was "on duty" after this
//Still remember the incident in northern Maine where game wardens shot a mentally in veteran dead after reporting to a police call outside of their jurisdiction
 
2013-02-28 05:49:39 AM
Another responsible gun owner.
 
2013-02-28 05:50:24 AM
I nearly had that happen after having Chipotle for lunch.
 
2013-02-28 05:54:26 AM
He didn't even get a chance to yell "Hooo boy!" after squeezing out the left cheek sneak.
 
2013-02-28 06:12:39 AM
 holster was securely attached to the lieutenant's lap.

I'd like to know a little more about this sentence. What does this mean, "attached to his lap"? Our dept carries Glock 9mm's and we are required to carry at ALL TIMES, even "off-duty". Said weapon is carried in at LEAST a level 2 holster, on, you know, MY WAIST.

Not sure 1) why the gun was in this guy's "lap" and 2) why it went off. I've been sitting in a training class all week and everyone's weapon has managed to remain un-fired.

Also, we're required to have one round in the chamber at all times.
 
2013-02-28 06:20:11 AM
www.mwattorneys.com
 
2013-02-28 06:41:19 AM
More proof that firearms are perfectly safe in the hands of experts.
 
2013-02-28 06:49:34 AM
Lesson learned: Always decock before holstering.
 
2013-02-28 06:53:44 AM
Maine State trooper?
evilengineering.com
 
2013-02-28 07:02:33 AM

OniExpress: While I'm sure that the response would be that the officer was considered "on duty" and everything was kosher, I'm just as sure that no one in a computer training course needs to be sitting there with a chambered round.  Then again, this is from my home state of Maine, where there has never in it's history been a police (or game warden, or border patrol, or whoever in the state can carry a loaded weapon without a CCP nowadays) shooting ruled to be unjustified.

/Im going to guess that everyone else in the room was "on duty" after this
//Still remember the incident in northern Maine where game wardens shot a mentally in veteran dead after reporting to a police call outside of their jurisdiction


A) Not a mentally in veteran!

B) Story is impossible based on claims that only police should have guns because they are properly trained to use them.
 
2013-02-28 07:05:27 AM
Ha, my friend is a Maine trooper. I had to check to see if this was him
 
2013-02-28 07:18:57 AM
Guns don't kill people - shifting in your seat kills people.  Ban seats!
 
2013-02-28 07:33:16 AM

Creoena: Guns don't kill people - shifting in your seat kills people.  Ban seats!


I believe in a person's right to own a seat. What I don't believe in are high-capacity seats that hold over 200 pounds. No one needs to be that fat.
 
2013-02-28 07:43:39 AM

darch: Also, we're required to have one round in the chamber at all times.


Only one?
 
2013-02-28 08:00:53 AM

OniExpress: //Still remember the incident in northern Maine where game wardens shot a mentally in veteran dead after reporting to a police call outside of their jurisdiction


Not sure about Maine, but in my state the DNR's (department of natural resources) jurisdiction is the entire state, and they have less oversight and more powers than regular officers, even state troopers.
 
2013-02-28 08:07:01 AM
Ha, he says he knows the guy though
 
2013-02-28 08:09:20 AM
There is no such thing as an AD. NDs, on the other hand, occur with startling frequency.
 
2013-02-28 08:09:46 AM
Gremlins!
 
2013-02-28 08:22:00 AM
When I was a Security Specialist in the Indiana Air National Guard, they would issue us an M-16 (not A1) and twenty round clip of ammo. We would then lock the bolt forward and insert the clip while in the presence of the armorer.

It was very easy to accidentally chamber a round in the M-16. We had the chrome bolt and the heavier recoil buffer. You could bounce the butt of the rifle on the ground and it would chamber. At the end of the day, you would line up and one at a time clear your weapon while it's pointed in to a barrel of sand.

To avoid any problems, prior to getting in to line, I would pull the bolt back a bit to make sure I hadn't chambered a round. If I did, I would clear it before I got in line. I honestly can't remember if there was anything bad about being caught with an M-16 with a round in the chamber.

When you got to the barrel, you took the clip out and handed it to the amorer. You then put aimed the rifle at the barrel of sand and cleared your rifle. I think it went this way: Show the armorer that it is on Safe. Pull the charging handle back, look down the chamber to make sure it's clear, let the bolt go forward, rotate the selector to Semi and pull the trigger (click). This was from 1985. I may have missed something.

One afternoon, I was standing in line and the guy in front of me was clearing his rifle. We were all talking and looking forward to getting out of there. Suddenly, there was a very load bang and everyone shut up. The guy in front of me had a round in the chamber and had fired it in to the barrel. Not sure if he had skipped anything or the round never ejected when he pulled the charging handle. As soon as it was quiet, a door flew open and this guy with a very shocked face appeared. He also had the absolute worse comb over I ever saw and half of it was no longer combed over. We all started laughing but I tried to make it as if I was laughing at the accidental discharge.

Whatever happened to the guy, it wasn't much. Next drill, he was walking around with a loaded rifle.
 
2013-02-28 08:23:10 AM
Safety's off, Barn.
 
2013-02-28 08:35:10 AM

Harry Freakstorm: It was very easy to accidentally chamber a round in the M-16. We had the chrome bolt and the heavier recoil buffer. You could bounce the butt of the rifle on the ground and it would chamber.


No Air Force, just no
 
2013-02-28 08:45:26 AM

jaybeezey: OniExpress: While I'm sure that the response would be that the officer was considered "on duty" and everything was kosher, I'm just as sure that no one in a computer training course needs to be sitting there with a chambered round.  Then again, this is from my home state of Maine, where there has never in it's history been a police (or game warden, or border patrol, or whoever in the state can carry a loaded weapon without a CCP nowadays) shooting ruled to be unjustified.

/Im going to guess that everyone else in the room was "on duty" after this
//Still remember the incident in northern Maine where game wardens shot a mentally in veteran dead after reporting to a police call outside of their jurisdiction

A) Not a mentally in veteran!

B) Story is impossible based on claims that only police should have guns because they are properly trained to use them.


A) "Mentally Ill"

B) Bwuh?
 
2013-02-28 08:52:09 AM

Tat'dGreaser: Harry Freakstorm: It was very easy to accidentally chamber a round in the M-16. We had the chrome bolt and the heavier recoil buffer. You could bounce the butt of the rifle on the ground and it would chamber.

No Air Force, just no


I'm thinking the buffer spring must either be crap or it would take one hell of a bounce to unock the gas key.

/played with many ar's, but never had a chance to shoot an assault rifle.
 
2013-02-28 08:53:48 AM

Farce-Side: OniExpress: //Still remember the incident in northern Maine where game wardens shot a mentally in veteran dead after reporting to a police call outside of their jurisdiction

Not sure about Maine, but in my state the DNR's (department of natural resources) jurisdiction is the entire state, and they have less oversight and more powers than regular officers, even state troopers.


From what I recall, this vet had been in a bad spot for years but the combination of having much of his medical aid slashed and moving his designated medical facility a good hour further had left him pretty desperate and agitated.  At some point the police were called, but what arrived there was a game warden (or wha it two?  can't remember), someone who had no business responding to the call.  The guy had been out in his back yard/field target shooting when they arrived, and was holding the rifle by the stock/barrel/whatever you wanna call it when they came onto his property.  The guy was a bit confused and "what the fark are you doing on my property", and on his way walking to them he was shot repeatedly and died shortly thereafter.

If that had been a civilian, or a non-police-officer in just about any other state, there would have been some kind of criminal investigation.  However, Maine has it's perfect track record of "justified shootings" to maintain so the whole thing was just brushed away.

I'm not saying that all cops are evil, or that guns or bad, or anything like that; I'm saying that Maine law-enforcement and all it's similar state offices are seriously farked up because there's never any penalty when they make the larger mistakes.
 
2013-02-28 08:54:08 AM

way south: I'm thinking the buffer spring must either be crap or it would take one hell of a bounce to unock the gas key.

/played with many ar's, but never had a chance to shoot an assault rifle.


It's physically impossible to have the bolt forward, smack it on the ground and the bolt to go through a complete charging cycle. Yes, when the bolt is locked to the rear you can smack it and it will go forward. What probably happened was comb over was dicking around and charged the weapon. Then dipsh*t weapons barrel crew wasn't doing their job and watching him clear.
 
2013-02-28 08:55:13 AM

OniExpress: jaybeezey: OniExpress: While I'm sure that the response would be that the officer was considered "on duty" and everything was kosher, I'm just as sure that no one in a computer training course needs to be sitting there with a chambered round.  Then again, this is from my home state of Maine, where there has never in it's history been a police (or game warden, or border patrol, or whoever in the state can carry a loaded weapon without a CCP nowadays) shooting ruled to be unjustified.

/Im going to guess that everyone else in the room was "on duty" after this
//Still remember the incident in northern Maine where game wardens shot a mentally in veteran dead after reporting to a police call outside of their jurisdiction

A) Not a mentally in veteran!

B) Story is impossible based on claims that only police should have guns because they are properly trained to use them.

A) "Mentally Ill"

B) Bwuh?


More gun-nuttery crap. Don't try to address it, because you'll just cause your brain to hemorrhage.
 
2013-02-28 08:55:32 AM

No Time To Explain: FTFA: " When asked if the safety was on, he said he didn't have any further details about specifics other than the holster was securely attached to the lieutenant's lap."

/well, there seems to be your problem officer
//derp


"...the holster was securely attached to the lieutenant's lap ..."

I'm thinking they should not be worn there? And if so, how was an injury avoided?

huh
 
2013-02-28 08:55:53 AM
Have one of the first USP40s.  If it's anything like that then yeah... he farked up big time.

Turn in your Massad Ayoob club card.
 
2013-02-28 08:57:16 AM

Harry Freakstorm: while it's pointed in to a barrel of sand.


Red barrel? with a red #10 coffee can welded in the middle of the top? Tilted a bit on a painted red Angle iron stand?
Yep.
They used a coffee can so they could replace it if need be, so for an inspection by big brass, there would be no holes in it.
Note the spot welds, too, easy to grind off and replace.
Harder to cover up is a bullet dent in an armored door inside of a WSA.
Those things are the things of legend.
 
2013-02-28 09:02:55 AM
I would like to witness the re-enactment. Maybe this time they can get it right and hurt somebody.
 
2013-02-28 09:19:57 AM
So disappointed.  I had hoped it was his pec, pen, coc, oh you get the idea that had discharged and maybe he shot a load into the face of his superior, not shot off his metal gun.....you know, some sort of nasty sexual thing...how boring for fark....
 
2013-02-28 09:24:23 AM

OniExpress: Farce-Side: OniExpress: //Still remember the incident in northern Maine where game wardens shot a mentally in veteran dead after reporting to a police call outside of their jurisdiction

Not sure about Maine, but in my state the DNR's (department of natural resources) jurisdiction is the entire state, and they have less oversight and more powers than regular officers, even state troopers.

From what I recall, this vet had been in a bad spot for years but the combination of having much of his medical aid slashed and moving his designated medical facility a good hour further had left him pretty desperate and agitated.  At some point the police were called, but what arrived there was a game warden (or wha it two?  can't remember), someone who had no business responding to the call.  The guy had been out in his back yard/field target shooting when they arrived, and was holding the rifle by the stock/barrel/whatever you wanna call it when they came onto his property.  The guy was a bit confused and "what the fark are you doing on my property", and on his way walking to them he was shot repeatedly and died shortly thereafter.

If that had been a civilian, or a non-police-officer in just about any other state, there would have been some kind of criminal investigation.  However, Maine has it's perfect track record of "justified shootings" to maintain so the whole thing was just brushed away.

I'm not saying that all cops are evil, or that guns or bad, or anything like that; I'm saying that Maine law-enforcement and all it's similar state offices are seriously farked up because there's never any penalty when they make the larger mistakes.


I'm no cop apologist, and it does sound like the game wardens could have been in the wrong here, but if he was shooting in a field, then the game wardens did indeed have a reason to respond to the call.  That "less oversight and extra powers" thing I mentioned earlier includes the ability to enter onto and search someone else's property if they have reason to believe poaching may be taking place, without the need for a warrant.  Sounds like after they got there, though, they may have misjudged a threat.  I can see that going either way in an investigation.
 
2013-02-28 09:25:27 AM
Could've been worse, he could've discharged early during a cookout in his own backyard killing the girl grinding on him.

Those from Detroit knows what I am talking about.  Her family still denies that their little girl would dance like that, they argue that he must have pulled the gun and fired.  He was standing by the grill, gun holstered in a soft holster at waist(under sport shorts) and the bullet went through her chest in a downward angle.  Evidence and witnesses backs those events, but no your little girl wouldn't get all freaky at a cookout.  Her last words were probably "Is that a big gu (bang)".
 
2013-02-28 09:46:08 AM
I have a cousin who was doing his Yosemite Sam impersonation in a police locker room and discharged his service revolver into the floor.

Apparently that is one of the few ways that a cop can get fired.  The last I head he moved 20 miles across the state line and is on a different force.
 
2013-02-28 10:02:53 AM
Obligatory: I'm sure that happens to a lot of guys/we can just cuddle, etc.
 
2013-02-28 10:29:06 AM
That's just an office pop. Everyone does it.

/h&k makes a nice pistol, they don't just go off shaking it around, dude hit the trigger with a few lbs of force.
 
2013-02-28 10:39:19 AM

TheGreatGazoo: I have a cousin who was doing his Yosemite Sam impersonation in a police locker room and discharged his service revolver into the floor.

Apparently that is one of the few ways that a cop can get fired.  The last I head he moved 20 miles across the state line and is on a different force.


The town of Noble, OK had a couple cops fire at some snake that was hanging from something.  A quarter-mile away a bullet hit and killed a five-year old.  Yeah they got fired.
 
2013-02-28 10:48:22 AM
Was expecting poop
 
2013-02-28 11:24:31 AM
I'm betting on a worn out holster:
www.practicaltacticaltraining.com
 
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