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(Telegraph)   Study states that pessimists live longer. Great, now I've got THAT going for me too   (telegraph.co.uk) divider line 56
    More: Asinine, Victor Meldrew, Office for National Statistics, terminal illness  
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2366 clicks; posted to Main » on 28 Feb 2013 at 12:25 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-28 11:27:59 AM  
I wasn't willing to sit through the ad to read the story, but I think this claim is dubious.

BobNesta420: The article's a bit misleading as to the type of person that lives longer. It opens by saying that "Older people blighted by pessimism and fear for the future are more likely to live longer," though the following paragraph says that it's "those with low expectations for a "satisfying future" actually led healthier lives."

To me, those are two very different things. Someone who has a fear of the future or a general negative outlook is not the same as someone who has low (or no) expectations for a satisfying future. In my opinion, the healthiest perspective that someone can have is to have no expectations which, it sounds like, describes the group in the article that were found to live longer, healthier lives. If something good happens, it's a pleasant surprise. If something bad happens - well, that's a bummer, but you deal with it and then move on.

In contrast, people who are "overly optimistic" have significant expectations which are probably rarely, if ever met. So, it would make sense that if you spend so much of your life with these grandiose expectations that never materialize, you'd be more likely to become depressed by the fact that their life didn't turn out how they hoped and expected it would. And depression leads to illness and poor overall health. So yeah.

/Did I overanalyze that? I think I might have.


I didn't want to sit through the ad in order to read the article, but I was skeptical of the claim in the headline.  Your interpretation makes sense to me, so now I can go back to my day unfettered by any dissonance that may have been caused by a mismatch of my worldview and a claim made in some article I was unwilling to read.  Thank-you.
 
2013-02-28 11:39:13 AM  

Eckyhade: I am a little doubtful of the veracity of this claim.


Now that's how you do it.

And even if it is true, I'll most likely be the exception to the rule.
 
2013-02-28 12:36:05 PM  
Great. A few more years being a bed ridden invalid, whose care sucks away any cash I've managed to save.

I don't want to live longer, I want to be independent and active for a larger percent of my life.
 
2013-02-28 06:14:16 PM  

BobNesta420: The article's a bit misleading as to the type of person that lives longer. It opens by saying that "Older people blighted by pessimism and fear for the future are more likely to live longer," though the following paragraph says that it's "those with low expectations for a "satisfying future" actually led healthier lives."

To me, those are two very different things. Someone who has a fear of the future or a general negative outlook is not the same as someone who has low (or no) expectations for a satisfying future. In my opinion, the healthiest perspective that someone can have is to have no expectations which, it sounds like, describes the group in the article that were found to live longer, healthier lives. If something good happens, it's a pleasant surprise. If something bad happens - well, that's a bummer, but you deal with it and then move on.

In contrast, people who are "overly optimistic" have significant expectations which are probably rarely, if ever met. So, it would make sense that if you spend so much of your life with these grandiose expectations that never materialize, you'd be more likely to become depressed by the fact that their life didn't turn out how they hoped and expected it would. And depression leads to illness and poor overall health. So yeah.

/Did I overanalyze that? I think I might have.


I would have to agree. I have seen friends and family who were very optimistic about things then crashed hard when those expectations were not met.  Realism anchors one to the truths of  the world.  Optimism sets one up for a slap in the face from reality.

/ Yes we both over analyzed this.
/my excuse is too many  beers.
 
2013-02-28 10:12:51 PM  
FTFA: "We argue, though, that the outcomes of optimistic, accurate or pessimistic forecasts may depend on age and available resources."  Translation:  our study produced no useful conclusions.
 
2013-03-01 11:40:38 AM  
I'm not sure what I would qualify as

Q)"is the glass half full or half empty?"

A) Who gives a flying fark if its half full or half empty. If half a glass is enough why are you worried about having a full glass, if its not enough go get more.
 
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