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(io9)   Sometimes when a scientist says "Oops" it is a good thing   (io9.com) divider line 50
    More: Cool, scientists, energy density, Graphene, fabrication process  
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7175 clicks; posted to Geek » on 27 Feb 2013 at 10:18 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-27 08:10:58 AM  
OK, that's neat.
 
2013-02-27 08:35:19 AM  
"The most exciting phrase to hear in science, the one that heralds new discoveries, is not Eureka! (I found it!) but rather, 'hmm... that's funny...'"
- Isaac Asimov
 
2013-02-27 10:26:22 AM  
Wouldn't be the first time a scientist saying "oops" was a good thing -- it's the reason we have penicillin and shatter-resistant windshields.
 
2013-02-27 10:27:07 AM  
It can join:

* vulcanized rubber
* penicillin
* the pacemaker
* saccharin
* teflon

among many, many others

And wow, do I hope this bears out. It would be truly revolutionary.
 
2013-02-27 10:29:08 AM  
Scientific progress goes "Boink" ?
 
2013-02-27 10:30:38 AM  
Graphene was first made using scotch tape and a chunk of graphite.

/CSB
 
2013-02-27 10:40:14 AM  

gopher321: OK, that's neat.


Agreed. Very neat.
 
2013-02-27 10:45:50 AM  

ipsiad: Graphene was first made using scotch tape and a chunk of graphite.

/CSB


And just on a lark, too. They were using the scotch tape to transfer small quantities of graphite for a completely different experiment, and one of them went. "HAH! I wonder what this looks like under the microscope? Let's screw around with the SEM and see what it OH MY GOD HOLY SHIAT GET OVER HERE NOW."

/Well, more or less.
 
2013-02-27 10:47:28 AM  
Oh! Cosmic background radiation was also discovered by accident, by two technicians at bell labs who were trying to calibrate/clean the satellites. "Why the fark do we keep getting static? We've got these things pointed straight up! There's nothing THERE! Hrm. Though we know some scientists that are working on something simillar. Maybe they can tell us what the hell's wrong with this thing." Scientist: "FARK."
 
2013-02-27 10:51:28 AM  
media.tumblr.com
That'll do, Piggly... That'll do.
 
2013-02-27 10:57:12 AM  

whistleridge: It can join:

* vulcanized rubber
* penicillin
* the pacemaker
* saccharin
* teflon

among many, many others. 

And wow, do I hope this bears out. It would be truly revolutionary.


Missing from the list...
www.myconfinedspace.com
 
2013-02-27 10:57:29 AM  
That site is blocked at work as "Entertainment" - anyone that can give me the basics?  Or better yet a copy of the text?
 
2013-02-27 11:00:43 AM  

Fizpez: That site is blocked at work as "Entertainment" - anyone that can give me the basics?  Or better yet a copy of the text?


Video URL: http://vimeo.com/51873011


http://io9.com/5987086/meet-the-scientific-accident-that-could-ch ange- the-world

Last year, researchers at UCLA made a rather fantastic, if serendipitous, discovery. A team of scientists led by chemist <a title="blocked::http://www.chem.ucla.edu/dept/Faculty/kaner/" href="http://www.chem.ucla.edu/dept/Faculty/kaner/">Richard Kaner had just finished devising an efficient method for producing high-quality sheets of the Nobel-prize winning supermaterial known as graphene... with a consumer-grade DVD drive. That was groundbreaking in and of itself, but the real surprise came when Maher El-Kady, a researcher in Kaner's lab, wired a small square of their high quality carbon sheets up to a lightbulb. Then something incredible happened.
As the video above explains, Kaner and El-Kady had stumbled upon an energy storage medium with revolutionary potential. Imagine filling your smart phone with a long-lasting charge in just a couple seconds, or an electric car in a minute. Future applications, , looked very promising.
Fast forward one year, and Kaner and El-Kady are even closer to realizing a tomorrow rich with supercapacitor technology. In a paper published in , the researchers report that El-Kady's original fabrication process (highlighted in the video) can be made even more efficient. More efficient production of high quality graphene means it's scalable. And scalability, of course, can lead to manufacturing and wide-scale technological implementation.
Here we demonstrate a scalable fabrication of graphene micro-supercapacitors over large areas by direct laser writing on graphite oxide films using a standard LightScribe DVD burner. More than 100 micro-supercapacitors can be produced on a single disc in 30min or less... These micro-supercapacitors demonstrate a power density of ~200Wcm−3, which is among the highest values achieved for any supercapacitor.
The upshot? The supercapacitors that Kaner and El-Kady are producing with freaking DVD burners could find their way into consumer tech way sooner than many might have originally guessed. (While minute-charge electric cars may still be a ways off, the fact these sheets are as unobtrusive and flexible as they are bodes well for their incorporation into plenty of near-future technologies - roll-up displays, for instance, or e-paper.) According to Kaner, his lab is already courting partners in industry. Color us excited.
The above video, by and .
 
2013-02-27 11:01:06 AM  

Fizpez: That site is blocked at work as "Entertainment" - anyone that can give me the basics?  Or better yet a copy of the text?



Meet the scientific accident that could change the worldhttp://ganja.gawkerassets.com/assets/base.v10/img/ui/menu-plus.p ng?has h=f33b8); background-color: transparent; height: 15px; display: inline-block; float: none; cursor: pointer; background-position: 100% 50%; background-repeat: no-repeat no-repeat;">Robert T. Gonzalez<a data-cke-saved-href="<a href=" href="<a href=" http:="" www.chem.ucla.edu="" dept="" faculty="" kaner="" "="" target="_blank">http://www.chem.ucla.edu/dept/Faculty/kaner/" style="margin: 0px; padding: 0px; border: 0px; outline: 0px; font-style: inherit; font-family: inherit; vertical-align: baseline; text-decoration: none; color: rgb(121, 18, 101);">Richard Kaner had just finished devising an efficient method for producing high-quality sheets of the Nobel-prize winning supermaterial known as graphene... with a consumer-grade DVD drive. That was groundbreaking in and of itself, but the real surprise came when Maher El-Kady, a researcher in Kaner's lab, wired a small square of their high quality carbon sheets up to a lightbulb. Then something incredible happened.

<a data-cke-saved-href="<a href=" href="<a href=" http:="" www.chem.ucla.edu="" dept="" faculty="" kaner="" "="" target="_blank">As the video above explains, Kaner and El-Kady had stumbled upon an energy storage medium with revolutionary potential. Imagine filling your smart phone with a long-lasting charge in just a couple seconds, or an electric car in a minute. Future applications,  Science, looked  very promising.

Fast forward one year, and Kaner and El-Kady are even closer to realizing a tomorrow rich with supercapacitor technology. In a paper published inNature Communications, the researchers report that El-Kady's original fabrication process (highlighted in the video) can be made even more efficient. More efficient production of high quality graphene means it's scalable. And scalability, of course, can lead to manufacturing and wide-scale technological implementation.

Here we demonstrate a scalable fabrication of graphene micro-supercapacitors over large areas by direct laser writing on graphite oxide films using a standard LightScribe DVD burner. More than 100 micro-supercapacitors can be produced on a single disc in 30min or less... These micro-supercapacitors demonstrate a power density of ~200Wcm−3, which is among the highest values achieved for any supercapacitor.

The upshot? The supercapacitors that Kaner and El-Kady are producing  with freaking DVD burners could find their way into consumer tech way sooner than many might have originally guessed. (While minute-charge electric cars may still be a ways off, the fact these sheets are as unobtrusive and flexible as they are bodes well for their incorporation into plenty of near-future technologies - roll-up displays, for instance, or e-paper.) According to Kaner, his lab is already courting partners in industry. Color us excited.
 
2013-02-27 11:02:11 AM  
mactobain:

Apparently we are both lazy copy-and-pasters :p
 
2013-02-27 11:03:12 AM  
sorry about that. should have reviewed first
 
2013-02-27 11:04:15 AM  
Holy Fark... that IS exciting.

Thanks a ton!
 
2013-02-27 11:04:16 AM  
You can make an electric car that charges in a minute, and some goofball will still forget and wind up stuck by the side of the road.

There are some things that science can't fix.

/Very cool tech, tho.
 
2013-02-27 11:10:52 AM  

Cybernetic: You can make an electric car that charges in a minute, and some goofball will still forget and wind up stuck by the side of the road.

There are some things that science can't fix.

/Very cool tech, tho.


I'm still waiting for the dickwads to install a tiny solar panel on a cell phone.  And a cigarette lighter.  And a bottle opener.
 
2013-02-27 11:19:13 AM  
  I'm a scientist and I said "oops" not too long ago.  Now I have a 4 month old baby.
 
2013-02-27 11:23:47 AM  
www.nndb.com

"What'd you say?!" "Nothing, just lay back down." "No, what'd you say? Did you say 'oops'?!"
 
2013-02-27 11:24:11 AM  
How is this an oops? They achieved their original goals and then saw something new. This is not so much as oops as "Holy frack! Did you see that?", "Lets try that again.", "Well I'll be damned it is a reproduceable result.", and "Yes we can scale this up to cost effective production."
 
2013-02-27 11:26:07 AM  

Cybernetic: You can make an electric car that charges in a minute, and some goofball will still forget and wind up stuck by the side of the road.


Charging a modest EV "in a minute" would overload the electrical service of most medium sized office buildings. I don't think I want Johnny Q. Public waving around a plug rated for several megawatts. The batteries have not been the limiting factor in charge times for decades now.
=Smidge=
 
2013-02-27 11:30:15 AM  

Slaves2Darkness: How is this an oops? They achieved their original goals and then saw something new. This is not so much as oops as "Holy frack! Did you see that?", "Lets try that again.", "Well I'll be damned it is a reproduceable result.", and "Yes we can scale this up to cost effective production."


In my experience the bolded part is one manifestation of "oops" in the scientific world.
 
2013-02-27 11:34:09 AM  

Wicked Chinchilla: Slaves2Darkness: How is this an oops? They achieved their original goals and then saw something new. This is not so much as oops as "Holy frack! Did you see that?", "Lets try that again.", "Well I'll be damned it is a reproduceable result.", and "Yes we can scale this up to cost effective production."

In my experience the bolded part is one manifestation of "oops" in the scientific world.


That said, other manifestations of the word 'oops' are:
"Oh shiat, I just put acid in the base waste jar."
"Oh fark, someone put this beaker in with the clean beakers but didn't clean it out properly."
 
2013-02-27 11:38:31 AM  
Um....I submitted this exact article with different headline. It is no longer in my submissions.

What's up with that?
 
2013-02-27 11:39:17 AM  

Felgraf: Wicked Chinchilla: Slaves2Darkness: How is this an oops? They achieved their original goals and then saw something new. This is not so much as oops as "Holy frack! Did you see that?", "Lets try that again.", "Well I'll be damned it is a reproduceable result.", and "Yes we can scale this up to cost effective production."

In my experience the bolded part is one manifestation of "oops" in the scientific world.

That said, other manifestations of the word 'oops' are:
"Oh shiat, I just put acid in the base waste jar."
"Oh fark, someone put this beaker in with the clean beakers but didn't clean it out properly."


"Do I smell gas?  Oh Fark, no one told me this was cyanide-based"
 
2013-02-27 11:40:04 AM  

King Something: Wouldn't be the first time a scientist saying "oops" was a good thing -- it's the reason we have penicillin and shatter-resistant windshields.


Having spent 10 years of my life working for a company that made windshields (in product development), I'm hoping you can tell me what aspect of windshields was an "oops"?
Don't mean to sound snarky; I'm just curious. Both the shape (curved like an egg shell) and the lamination both seem pretty intuitive to me.

For the record, windshields are not generally heat treated or tempered (although heat is used to shape them).
 
2013-02-27 11:41:26 AM  

Witty_Retort: Um....I submitted this exact article with different headline. It is no longer in my submissions.

What's up with that?


You touch yourself at night.
 
2013-02-27 11:42:27 AM  

SewerSquirrels: King Something: Wouldn't be the first time a scientist saying "oops" was a good thing -- it's the reason we have penicillin and shatter-resistant windshields.

Having spent 10 years of my life working for a company that made windshields (in product development), I'm hoping you can tell me what aspect of windshields was an "oops"?
Don't mean to sound snarky; I'm just curious. Both the shape (curved like an egg shell) and the lamination both seem pretty intuitive to me.

For the record, windshields are not generally heat treated or tempered (although heat is used to shape them).


The lamination part. A chemist left a plastic solution in a beaker over the weekend, it evaporated and formed a thin coating. He accidentally broke the beaker, saw all the glass stuck to the plastic, and his brain went "OH."

That's the story, anyways. That said, it *does* take a special kind of mind to invent something that, afterwards, just seems inherently obvious and intuitive.
 
2013-02-27 11:54:55 AM  

BKITU: Witty_Retort: Um....I submitted this exact article with different headline. It is no longer in my submissions.

What's up with that?

You touch yourself at night.


HOW DO YOU KNOW!!!! HOW DO THEY KNOW?? ARE THEY USING DRONES???!?!?!
I mean....no that can't be it.
 
2013-02-27 12:04:18 PM  
www.stainblue.com

yes....yes it is
 
2013-02-27 12:14:12 PM  
"You had me at 'compostable batteries'."
 
2013-02-27 12:49:35 PM  

Felgraf: ipsiad: Graphene was first made using scotch tape and a chunk of graphite.

/CSB

And just on a lark, too. They were using the scotch tape to transfer small quantities of graphite for a completely different experiment, and one of them went. "HAH! I wonder what this looks like under the microscope? Let's screw around with the SEM and see what it OH MY GOD HOLY SHIAT GET OVER HERE NOW."

/Well, more or less.


Strange how that CSB has no relation on how getting Graphene was first achieved or how they got their Noble.

http://www.graphene.manchester.ac.uk/story/
 
2013-02-27 12:51:33 PM  
Wasn't sure which was more appropriate so you get both, lucky you.

i2.listal.com

4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-27 01:53:06 PM  
Wasn't this on here last week?
 
2013-02-27 02:04:41 PM  
Scotch guard, popciles, toasted ravioli, gooey butter cake are all commercial products that were oops discoveries
 
2013-02-27 02:43:55 PM  

workaholicandy: Strange how that CSB has no relation on how getting Graphene was first achieved or how they got their Noble.

http://www.graphene.manchester.ac.uk/story/


Strange, I swear I heard them telling the story on the radio once, about how they decided to measure it just sort of for curiosity's sake, and discovered they'd made graphene. Perhaps they were embelishing, or I misremembered the story.
 
2013-02-27 02:52:34 PM  
So we will get our phasers after all. Or pulse weapons. Or EMP-nades.
 
2013-02-27 04:01:09 PM  
I know Kaner.  Great guy.
 
2013-02-27 04:28:30 PM  
"These micro-supercapacitors demonstrate a power density of ~200Wcm−3, which is among the highest values achieved for any supercapacitor."

200w/cm³, that's fantastic! Can i see 1cm³ of it? No? You can only make it in sheets 4 atoms thick on rigid, non-layered substrate? Oh...
 
2013-02-27 04:43:57 PM  

mactobain: Fizpez: That site is blocked at work as "Entertainment" - anyone that can give me the basics?  Or better yet a copy of the text?

Video URL: http://vimeo.com/51873011


http://io9.com/5987086/meet-the-scientific-accident-that-could-ch ange- the-world


The video won't play for me. Could someone tell me what the oops was? They deliberately made the graphene with a dvd burner so that isn't it. He deliberately hooked the graphene to a light bulb, but the text doesn't tell what happened or how it was an 'oops'.
 
2013-02-27 05:27:56 PM  
 
2013-02-27 05:28:40 PM  

whistleridge: It can join:

* vulcanized rubber
* penicillin
* the pacemaker
* saccharin
* teflon

among many, many others.

And wow, do I hope this bears out. It would be truly revolutionary.


Not just saccharin. Near as I can tell, just about every artificial sweetener in common use was discovered by falling into someone's mouth.
 
2013-02-27 05:33:27 PM  
According to the paper they wrote (rather than the webflick, which mentions nothing) the energy density of this material is still only about 1/4 that of lithium ion batteries.
It's still neat, entirely non-toxic, and potentially useful for a lot of low power situations. But it's not going to change the world.
 
2013-02-27 05:41:15 PM  
Step 3, harness the power of a lightning strike with a dense array of this stuff??  Yes/No?
 
2013-02-27 05:45:16 PM  
So, uh... Life finds a way?
 
2013-02-27 06:37:29 PM  
LoneVVolf:

200w/cm³, that's fantastic! Can i see 1cm³ of it? No? You can only make it in sheets 4 atoms thick on rigid, non-layered substrate? Oh...


That's a job for you engineering types.  Now get to work.
 
2013-02-27 07:43:51 PM  

LoneVVolf: 200w/cm³, that's fantastic! Can i see 1cm³ of it? No? You can only make it in sheets 4 atoms thick on rigid, non-layered substrate? Oh...


To the surprise of no one, the snarkiest post is by someone who clearly did not read the article.

static02.mediaite.com

("LSG" stands for "Laser-Scribed Graphene")
=Smidge=
 
2013-02-27 07:53:43 PM  
"When I scraped the graphene off of the DVD, I happened to notice that the hole in the center was a perfect fit for my dick.  So I decided to strip down and walk into Marisa's office wearing a graphene cock ring.  When I slipped it on - BANG - and I immediately knew I was into something good."

Uninhibited curiosity at work.

/ http://xkcd.com/242/
 
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