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(CBS Houston)   Patient who wakes up during eye surgery finds himself in an earlier century   (houston.cbslocal.com) divider line 84
    More: Scary, eye surgery, Columbia/HCA  
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21100 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Feb 2013 at 10:38 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-27 09:34:21 AM
blog.booklistonline.com
 
2013-02-27 09:57:44 AM
If that's true then the ramifications for the surgeons need to be more than simply being fired/sued. Taping a patient's mouth shut? Knocking out a tooth? It's crazy.
 
2013-02-27 10:04:32 AM
Solution: don't get surgery in Louisiana.
 
2013-02-27 10:06:14 AM
Multiple charges have also reportedly been filed against the defendants, including failures to properly treat the patient, and assault and battery.

"Reportedly?" This sort of thing isn't difficult to find out.
 
2013-02-27 10:42:15 AM
I don't know man. That story just doesn't pass the smell test.
 
2013-02-27 10:44:16 AM
CSB time.

I had a friend who woke up in the middle of surgery on her knee.  She was one of those who was awake, but paralyzed.  She felt everything, but couldn't move or signal that she was awake.  The doctors didn't believe her until she started repeating the things she heard them say during the operation.  She received a hefty settlement, but she was seriously messed up mentally after that for a while.  Horrifying.
 
2013-02-27 10:44:26 AM
$20 says the anesthesiologist should never have put a 400lb+ Mississippi man under.
 
2013-02-27 10:45:11 AM
I soooo hope this is not true. I like watching surgeries on the tee vee...but I never can watch eye surgeries. This situation would be pretty close to a worst nightmare for me.
 
2013-02-27 10:45:48 AM
Odd. I refer patients all the time for cataract surgery, and no one has ever had general anesthesia. I only hear about it in extreme cases of phobia or mental illness. I suspect something else is going on here.
 
2013-02-27 10:46:06 AM
I bet he didn't see that coming!
 
2013-02-27 10:46:56 AM

Zap_Rowsdower: CSB time.

I had a friend who woke up in the middle of surgery on her knee.  She was one of those who was awake, but paralyzed.  She felt everything, but couldn't move or signal that she was awake.  The doctors didn't believe her until she started repeating the things she heard them say during the operation.  She received a hefty settlement, but she was seriously messed up mentally after that for a while.  Horrifying.


Dood. There's no amount of money on this farking planet that would be worth going through that experience. Whatever she got, it wasn't enough. Holy fark.
 
2013-02-27 10:47:41 AM
A friend had eye surgery as a child. He woke up during the surgery and remembers seeing his own ear.

/squicked
 
2013-02-27 10:49:13 AM
Having had a radioactive plaque sewn into my eye and removed, I sympathise with the patient.

They put me under to put it in, an operation that apparently involved cutting some of the muscle to pull the eyeball out to place the radioactive "chip" under the tumor, but when I returned to have it removed a week later, they told me I'd be "awake" for the operation (but I wouldn't care, nor would I remember), I started freaking out on the way to the operating room. I don't remember anything beyond being wheeled to the operation, but they told me I was having pain issues, and they ended up putting me under anyway.

WTF?

Sure, MAYBE I wouldn't remember somebody basically plucking my eyeball out of the socket, and removing an implant, then tucking everything back in... who is to say I couldn't have some sort of psychological trauma from that?

That said, the doctors who treated me were top flight (outside of that). The other thing that sucked about treatment was the shots of local applied under my eye to "freeze" it for laser surgery follow ups. Those were painful as hell, even if the actual 5 or 10 minutes of laser treatments were not.
 
2013-02-27 10:49:47 AM
Nope.
 
2013-02-27 10:50:08 AM
I had surgery on my right eye following a retinal tear. Then another. Then another. They also removed my lens, replaced it a year later and I am looking to at least another surgery to finish everything.

They never knocked me out. I was sedated pretty heavily and they cryo'd my eye. I could see them working on it, very vaguely, and felt some sensation but no real pain. I would assume that they do they same thing for cataracts.

Also, I have been under for upwards of six hours due to minor complications. No issues. Trust me, I used to have a mild phobia of shiat getting poked in my eye... not anymore. The sedative must have wore off but if they had cryo'd the eye.. he would not have felt anything. That shiat takes a day at least to wear off.
 
2013-02-27 10:52:42 AM
www.keslingbriarpipes.com
 
2013-02-27 11:01:51 AM
I seriously hope this story isn't true.  That's downright horrifying!  They knocked his tooth out and he swollowed it?!  Sheesh!

CSB:

My daughter was dilivered by C-section, and I was in there for the operation.  It was really quite interesting watching them cut my wife open, remove all of her organs, then the baby.  Then, put her all back together again.  She was awake for the entire thing.  They just had her totally numbed from the chest down.

That was pretty farking wild!
 
2013-02-27 11:02:29 AM
I've got lens implants in both eyes from cataract surgery, and they do not knock you out. Trust me, I didn't even like eye drops and they refused me general anesthesia...I was seriously freaking out at the thought of it. Instead, they pop an IV kit in you, and about 5 minutes before the procedure, the anesthesiologist gives you some kind of anti-anxiety drug. It works, I was awake and alert through the whole thing, and never got upset. A week later they did my other eye, and same thing. Whole procedure is about 15 minutes. They place a tape mask over your whole face pretty much holding your eyelid open (none of the old metal retractors as shown above), and they insert a very small probe into your eye...turn on ultrasound, and basically liquify your lens, then vacuum the debris out. Then fold the new lens implant into a cylinder, insert it through the incision and flatten it out in place. The incision itself is less than 1.5mm, so no stitches or anything. I was back on my way home start to finish in under an hour each time.
 
2013-02-27 11:02:34 AM

trotsky: I had surgery on my right eye following a retinal tear. Then another. Then another. They also removed my lens, replaced it a year later and I am looking to at least another surgery to finish everything.


What's the recovery like from a procedure like that?

I'm seriously considering a vitrectomy* while I still have job and health insurance.  The actual procedure doesn't scare me, but thinking about what life would be like afterwards scares the hell out of me.


*  Poke a teensy vacuum cleaner nozzle into the eyeball and suck out all the goop.  Then put a bubble of gas back in to re-inflate the eyeball 'cuz it's not supposed to be, you know, empty.  Over time the gas dissolves as your eye (in theory) makes more goop.
 
2013-02-27 11:06:41 AM

LesserEvil: Having had a radioactive plaque sewn into my eye and removed, I sympathise with the patient.

They put me under to put it in, an operation that apparently involved cutting some of the muscle to pull the eyeball out to place the radioactive "chip" under the tumor, but when I returned to have it removed a week later, they told me I'd be "awake" for the operation (but I wouldn't care, nor would I remember), I started freaking out on the way to the operating room. I don't remember anything beyond being wheeled to the operation, but they told me I was having pain issues, and they ended up putting me under anyway.

WTF?


That's not uncommon. I get recurring tumors in one of my ears that I have to get scraped out every couple years. Back when I was young they'd knock me out, but in my early 20's they started keeping me awake. No memory, no problem.
 
2013-02-27 11:10:55 AM

Zap_Rowsdower: CSB time.

I had a friend who woke up in the middle of surgery on her knee.  She was one of those who was awake, but paralyzed.  She felt everything, but couldn't move or signal that she was awake.  The doctors didn't believe her until she started repeating the things she heard them say during the operation.  She received a hefty settlement, but she was seriously messed up mentally after that for a while.  Horrifying.


My theory is that everybody is awake during surgery and feels every excruciating moment. But the anesthetic in addition to paralyzing you stops your short term memory from functioning. That is why I always insist on a local as well.
 
2013-02-27 11:12:49 AM
This is one of the rare instances where I'd be in favor of suing the shiat out of that hospital.  It would take a very large sum of money to ease my anxiety if that happened to me.  What a nightmare.
 
2013-02-27 11:19:55 AM
While he was held down, he allegedly swallowed one of his teeth knocked out of place during the experience.

Holy fark, how does this happen? If he was moving around so hard that a tooth got knocked out, there's no reason that they should have continued with the surgery...
 
2013-02-27 11:20:43 AM

Zap_Rowsdower: CSB time.

I had a friend who woke up in the middle of surgery on her knee.  She was one of those who was awake, but paralyzed.  She felt everything, but couldn't move or signal that she was awake.  The doctors didn't believe her until she started repeating the things she heard them say during the operation.  She received a hefty settlement, but she was seriously messed up mentally after that for a while.  Horrifying.


CSS time for me:

I have memories of waking up during my third surgery (thankfully minor, just putting tubes in my ears), my fourth surgery (facing down while they were working on my brain for a few hours), and my seventh surgery (cataract surgery, as with the patient mentioned here.)  In none of those cases was I able to move.  The last one was actually kind of fun; I was still out of it and paralyzed (just conscious) and my vision was really screwed up, so I laid there watching all the interesting patterns of fractal light for a while.

/Ages for the above surgeries:  5, 10, and 31
//I might also have memories of my first or second surgery, but I take them with an "alien abduction" level of salt since I was only 9 months old.
 
2013-02-27 11:27:44 AM

Mikey1969: While he was held down, he allegedly swallowed one of his teeth knocked out of place during the experience.

Holy fark, how does this happen? If he was moving around so hard that a tooth got knocked out, there's no reason that they should have continued with the surgery...



The story is kindof fuzzy.  However I can say that quite a few patients have had teeth knocked out by being intubated emergently.  That's what I think of as soon as someone mentions tooth loss + sedation.
 
2013-02-27 11:28:51 AM

show me: Solution: don't get surgery in Louisiana.


img.gawkerassets.com

*Results may vary.
 
2013-02-27 11:35:19 AM

durbnpoisn: I seriously hope this story isn't true.  That's downright horrifying!  They knocked his tooth out and he swollowed it?!  Sheesh!

CSB:

My daughter was dilivered by C-section, and I was in there for the operation.  It was really quite interesting watching them cut my wife open, remove all of her organs, then the baby.  Then, put her all back together again.  She was awake for the entire thing.  They just had her totally numbed from the chest down.

That was pretty farking wild!


What???
 
2013-02-27 11:43:24 AM
I've had cataract surgery on both eyes. In my case, the zonules, which attach the lens sac to the inside of the eye, were frayed and weak, so they had to remove the entire sac, and suture the new lenses in place. They didn't discover this until they opened up the first eye. So, at that time, they removed the lens etc, and closed it back up. Then, a month later, another surgeon implanted the new lens. A while later, they did the other eye. Since that time, I went back to have a small nodule removed on my left eye, and, later, and more serious, I had to have one of the sutures replaced on the right eye. So, I have had three operations on  my left eye, and two on my right, and in none of these cases was I ever unconscious for the entire operation, only the first five minutes or so, when they were anesthetizing my eyes.

For the record, while the work on my left eye was mildly uncomfortable, but not memorable. Not so the right eye. There was pain, and I mentioned it to the doctor while he was working on it, and I think they may have pumped a little more of something into me, but I really don't know. When I talked to  him afterwards he explained that in some cases the nerve clusters are more crowded than others, and while I may have been feeling some pain, I was definitely NOT feeling what he was doing to my eye. So when several years later, I needed to go back to have the suture replaced, I was a little wary of what I might experience, but, though it was somewhat painful, it was not nearly as bad as I thought it might be.

In any case, before the surgery, and not because of the cataracts, I had severely bad vision in both eyes. Today, as I type this, I'm not even wearing glasses. While there is no guarantee that you won't feel any pain, if you HAVE to have the surgery, I'd say do it. It was so worth it in my case (by the way, the healing process afterwards, while not traumatic in the sense that someone is cutting into you eye, was more annoying than the surgery, but still, bearable)  .
 
2013-02-27 11:45:16 AM

The My Little Pony Killer: durbnpoisn: I seriously hope this story isn't true.  That's downright horrifying!  They knocked his tooth out and he swollowed it?!  Sheesh!

CSB:

My daughter was dilivered by C-section, and I was in there for the operation.  It was really quite interesting watching them cut my wife open, remove all of her organs, then the baby.  Then, put her all back together again.  She was awake for the entire thing.  They just had her totally numbed from the chest down.

That was pretty farking wild!

What???


Uh, I think the poor guy attended her autopsy and is just trying to hide the horrible memory in one that is more acceptable.  Just smile and nod.  Smile and niod.
 
2013-02-27 11:47:59 AM

BafflerMeal: Mikey1969: While he was held down, he allegedly swallowed one of his teeth knocked out of place during the experience.

Holy fark, how does this happen? If he was moving around so hard that a tooth got knocked out, there's no reason that they should have continued with the surgery...


The story is kindof fuzzy.  However I can say that quite a few patients have had teeth knocked out by being intubated emergently.  That's what I think of as soon as someone mentions tooth loss + sedation.


I can see that. From what I understand, intubation is not a fun, nor gentle, experience... Only times I've gotten it, I've already been dreaming about cotton candy clouds and a bunch of cherubs that look like J-Lo...
 
2013-02-27 11:51:53 AM

Mikey1969: BafflerMeal: Mikey1969: While he was held down, he allegedly swallowed one of his teeth knocked out of place during the experience.

Holy fark, how does this happen? If he was moving around so hard that a tooth got knocked out, there's no reason that they should have continued with the surgery...


The story is kindof fuzzy.  However I can say that quite a few patients have had teeth knocked out by being intubated emergently.  That's what I think of as soon as someone mentions tooth loss + sedation.

I can see that. From what I understand, intubation is not a fun, nor gentle, experience... Only times I've gotten it, I've already been dreaming about cotton candy clouds and a bunch of cherubs that look like J-Lo...



9/10 they paralyze the person first, so the clock is ticking until they die of asphyxiation if you don't manage to get the tube in.  So it can be rather forceful if it has to be.  And that's when it's planned.  When it has to be done in an emergency, getting that tube in becomes much more important than worrying about knocking out the teeth with the metal guide blade.

No idea about this case.  Just sounds like that might have happened to me, but I am experientially biased.
 
2013-02-27 11:54:20 AM
No.  No.  No. NO. NONONONONONONO
 
2013-02-27 11:56:41 AM
God-damn socialised medici - oh, wait
 
2013-02-27 11:57:12 AM
Fun times
 
2013-02-27 12:20:18 PM
Eye for an eye, swallowed tooth for a swallowed tooth.
 
2013-02-27 12:51:43 PM

Eirik: Odd. I refer patients all the time for cataract surgery, and no one has ever had general anesthesia. I only hear about it in extreme cases of phobia or mental illness. I suspect something else is going on here.


This. I had both my eyes done a few years ago. They used a local anesthetic and an IV drip. I was awake the whole time and didn't have any problems.
 
2013-02-27 12:57:37 PM
The My Little Pony Killer:
durbnpoisn: I seriously hope this story isn't true.  That's downright horrifying!  They knocked his tooth out and he swollowed it?!  Sheesh!

CSB:

My daughter was dilivered by C-section, and I was in there for the operation.  It was really quite interesting watching them cut my wife open, remove all of her organs, then the baby.  Then, put her all back together again.  She was awake for the entire thing.  They just had her totally numbed from the chest down.

That was pretty farking wild!

What???


He meant of course, displacing her abdominal viscera to better access the uterus.  They put it all back, you know.
 
2013-02-27 01:05:21 PM
This is why I always request a local anesthetic for eye surgery.

That and it really seems to unnerve the surgeon when I take an interest in what he's doing.
 
2013-02-27 01:10:32 PM
Actually, according to the stellar grammatical and spelling skills of Kyle Barnett of the Louisiana Record (the legal reporter from whence this came), they put a piece of 'tap' over his mouth. :P

I'd be a little upset if someone put a piece of a fixture used to control the flow of hot and cold water over my mouth, too.

http://louisianarecord.com/news/249367-man-who-awoke-during-cataract -s urgery-sues-over-loss-of-vision-and-alleged-torture
 
2013-02-27 01:12:31 PM
I'm not buying it.  That sounds like the whoppers the kids tell me when they broke something and come up with a story about how an elephant broke into the house.
 
2013-02-27 01:16:13 PM
Patients who wake up during surgery are people who lied about their past/present drug/alcohol use on the questionnaire.
 
2013-02-27 01:21:20 PM
I'm torn on this one. The idealist in me wants to call shenanigans because doctors wouldn't do something that barbaric.

The *realist* in me remembers how, after having several teeth extracted under anesthesia (car accident), the anesthetic wore off while they were scraping out bone fragments and stitching my gums. Wore off as in one moment I was out like a light and the next minute I was wide awake and screaming in pain trying to tell them, while my mouth was jacked open, that I could feel everything they were doing.

Two patients ended up bolting from the waiting room because of the screams and my husband didn't know what the hell was going on.

So yeah, I think it could happen.
 
2013-02-27 01:26:08 PM

over_and_done: trotsky: I had surgery on my right eye following a retinal tear. Then another. Then another. They also removed my lens, replaced it a year later and I am looking to at least another surgery to finish everything.

What's the recovery like from a procedure like that?

I'm seriously considering a vitrectomy* while I still have job and health insurance.  The actual procedure doesn't scare me, but thinking about what life would be like afterwards scares the hell out of me.


*  Poke a teensy vacuum cleaner nozzle into the eyeball and suck out all the goop.  Then put a bubble of gas back in to re-inflate the eyeball 'cuz it's not supposed to be, you know, empty.  Over time the gas dissolves as your eye (in theory) makes more goop.


GAH! That sounds horrible. What if the gas doesn't dissolve and the eye makes more goop anyway? Will the eye swell and then explode?
 
2013-02-27 01:27:29 PM

durbnpoisn: I seriously hope this story isn't true.  That's downright horrifying!  They knocked his tooth out and he swollowed it?!  Sheesh!

CSB:

My daughter was dilivered by C-section, and I was in there for the operation.  It was really quite interesting watching them cut my wife open, remove all of her organs, then the baby.  Then, put her all back together again.  She was awake for the entire thing.  They just had her totally numbed from the chest down.

That was pretty farking wild!


Amazing to think we've been doing C-sections for 2000 years
 
2013-02-27 01:37:29 PM

Phoenix_M: durbnpoisn: I seriously hope this story isn't true.  That's downright horrifying!  They knocked his tooth out and he swollowed it?!  Sheesh!

CSB:

My daughter was dilivered by C-section, and I was in there for the operation.  It was really quite interesting watching them cut my wife open, remove all of her organs, then the baby.  Then, put her all back together again.  She was awake for the entire thing.  They just had her totally numbed from the chest down.

That was pretty farking wild!

Amazing to think we've been doing C-sections for 2000 years


I've had 2 c-sections. The first one was a flipping nightmare. The second one was a dream.

The first time, the anesthesiologist was ping-ponging between my OR and the OR next door where a woman was being given an emergency c-section. I was almost 10 months pregnant with an almost 12 lb  baby and the damn nurses are cooing at me to curl up and tuck my knees to my chest. And the damn anesthesiologist kept missing the pocket between my vertebrae for the epi which was excruciating. Each time, although it missed the mark, a little bit of the epi juice got in so that by the time he DID hit the mark, I had too much and couldn't breathe unless my husband put his hand on my chest so that I could see myself inhale and exhale.

The second time was a breeze. Nothing but net. No breathing issues, either.

It's an interesting sensation, having a c-section. Sort of like being unzippered but with no pain. Just a let up of pressure initially, then a few tugs and being nudged this way and that. A lot of blood spilt on the floor though. I hope that was normal.
 
2013-02-27 02:07:29 PM
As someone facing a second spinal fusion surgery in a month, I would like to say one thing to all those who posted horror stories here.
AAAAAAAAGGGGGHHHHHHHHHHHHH!

/ really should have skipped this thread, what has been read...:O
 
2013-02-27 02:09:51 PM

megarian: I soooo hope this is not true. I like watching surgeries on the tee vee...but I never can watch eye surgeries. This situation would be pretty close to a worst nightmare for me.


The cool thing about cataract surgeries is that you get to watch it in real-time... you know, with your eyelids pried open and being awake and all.
 
2013-02-27 02:12:33 PM

trotsky: I had surgery on my right eye following a retinal tear. Then another. Then another. They also removed my lens, replaced it a year later and I am looking to at least another surgery to finish everything.

They never knocked me out. I was sedated pretty heavily and they cryo'd my eye. I could see them working on it, very vaguely, and felt some sensation but no real pain. I would assume that they do they same thing for cataracts.

Also, I have been under for upwards of six hours due to minor complications. No issues. Trust me, I used to have a mild phobia of shiat getting poked in my eye... not anymore. The sedative must have wore off but if they had cryo'd the eye.. he would not have felt anything. That shiat takes a day at least to wear off.


I've had cataract surgeries done in both eyes. You can see it, you can hear what's going on, you can feel sensations, you can smell the cauterizing... it's a real treat for the senses.
 
2013-02-27 02:17:22 PM
I'm disappointed by the distinct lack of time travelling in this article. >:-(
 
2013-02-27 02:28:54 PM
Am I in before J.S. Bach?
 
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