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(The Raw Story)   This story has something for everyone: lesbian teen sues school after being suspended for anti-bullying shirt. It's like a Mad Libs brought to life   (rawstory.com) divider line 57
    More: Fail, lesbian teen, teen sues, Lambda Legal, coming out, dean of students, education network, GLSEN, southern district  
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10471 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Feb 2013 at 9:22 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



Voting Results (Smartest)
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Archived thread
2013-02-27 09:26:13 AM  
7 votes:
What farking idiot has a problem with a woman who voluntarily shuts her trap for a whole day?
2013-02-27 09:45:04 AM  
6 votes:

pDiablo: hmm lets see, gay pride, lesbian day, hmm oh yes notting hill carnival ( celebration weekend for afro carrbibean culture..hey how about this one... Straight, white hardworking family man day..gimme a date and we'll make it so...


When a straight, white hardworking family man gets tied to a post and beaten to death just for being a straight, white hardworking family man, we'll give you your own day.
2013-02-27 09:30:41 AM  
5 votes:

spyderqueen: Okay, I'm not saying that this school isn't administrated by total assholes, but it's not like she got surprised with this suspension.  She knew it was the punishment she faced for doing this anyway.


No.

An unconstitutional action taken by a public school is no less unconstitutional because the school announced it ahead of time.
2013-02-27 10:13:22 AM  
4 votes:
The principal also called her parents to tell them their daughter was prohibited from participating in the National Day of Silence.

I'm afraid if it were my daughter, the principal and I would be having a one way conversation and his head would get put on straight.
He would receive one verbal warning from me, apologize to my kid, and STFU after that.
Or he'd be in court, losing. A lot.
I'd get an uppity high profile lawyer and tell him, tear flesh and you get 90%.
2013-02-27 09:35:49 AM  
4 votes:

Random Anonymous Blackmail: PAY ATTENTION TO ME I'M A LESBIAN AND I DESERVE BETTER RIGHTS THAN YOU.


Whether she was right or wrong aside, I do not understand that bit.  Establishing the right to peacefully demonstrate would benefit everyone.  Sure, she may be coming at it from a personal angle.  But that's how most people are attracted to their causes.
b3x
2013-02-27 10:26:06 AM  
3 votes:
at some point the LGBT community is going to come to the realization that society doesn't hate them for being LGBT, we are just annoyed that some wont SHUT THE FARK UP about being LGBT. It is really just like anyone else is is completely obsessed with some topic, that they just won't shut up about ... people roll their eyes and walk away, and then make fun of them at the water cooler. It isn't about who they are having sex with, it's about having something to talk about other than your lifestyle. Work on your social skills, and stop being so farking angry.

PETA is the same way. Yes we all agree that animals shouldn't be abused, but really your totally over the top. Ease up.
2013-02-27 10:20:03 AM  
3 votes:

Cybernetic: jack21221: Schools really need to lighten up. They had to have known that this was a legal minefield. Just let the student peacefully protest that day and get on with it.

IIRC, under the Supreme Court's Tinker v. Des Moines decision, an institution (such as a school) has a right to restrict activities (which may include speech) that are outside the purpose of that institution.

So, as admirable as the purpose of the student might be, from a legal standpoint she is not necessarily in the right.

/IANAL


Respectfully, that's almost 100% backwards. In Tinker, the Supreme Court held that a school could not punish a student wearing a black armband as a Vietnam protest, absent any evidence that the punishment was necessary to avoid substantial interference with school discipline or the rights of others. As they said in that decision:
"First Amendment rights, applied in light of the special characteristics of the school environment, are available to teachers and students. It can hardly be argued that either students or teachers shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate. This has been the unmistakable holding of this Court for almost 50 years. "

The white board is the only distinction here, but I'd say Tinker still applies. Specifically, the holding in Tinker noted that:
"The school officials banned and sought to punish petitioners for a silent, passive expression of opinion, unaccompanied by any disorder or disturbance on the part of petitioners. There is here no evidence whatever of petitioners' interference, actual or nascent, with the schools' work or of collision with the rights of other students to be secure and to be let alone. Accordingly, this case does not concern speech or action that intrudes upon the work of the schools or the rights of other students."
Similarly, use of a white board is a silent protest, unaccompanied by any disorder or disturbance.

Further, I'd be willing to bet that the school doesn't suspend kids who are deaf or mute and communicate via writing. This was a punishment specifically because of the student's political views.
2013-02-27 09:50:30 AM  
3 votes:
It's simple.  The school wants to teach it's curriculum.  If you allow one group to have a silent protest, then you must allow all groups to have their protests.  The school administration is removing itself from the morality judgement business entirely.   This does not equate to being pro bullying.   It's to keep a bunch of kids from waving their "LOOK AT ME, LOOK AT ME!  I'M SPECIAL!" beliefs around during education time.

No Anti Bullying, no LBGT, No Fundamentalist Christian, No KKK, No Hugs for Gunlovers, etc.   There are a lot of people with a lot of different moral codes, just shut up and pay attention in class.
2013-02-27 09:47:28 AM  
3 votes:

Coolfusis: pDiablo: hmm lets see, gay pride, lesbian day, hmm oh yes notting hill carnival ( celebration weekend for afro carrbibean culture..hey how about this one... Straight, white hardworking family man day..gimme a date and we'll make it so...

When a straight, white hardworking family man gets tied to a post and beaten to death just for being a straight, white hardworking family man, we'll give you your own day.


www.muzakblog.com
2013-02-27 09:36:38 AM  
3 votes:

Random Anonymous Blackmail: jack21221

Schools really need to lighten up. They had to have known that this was a legal minefield. Just let the student peacefully protest that day and get on with it.

Agreed, but also the spoiled snowflakes start stomping their feet and kicking up dust when they are not getting the attention they think they deserve. It sounds a lot like "no one is paying attention to me" PAY ATTENTION TO ME I'M A LESBIAN AND I DESERVE BETTER RIGHTS THAN YOU. THE SAME RIGHTS THAT YOU HAVE.

I blame the parents.


Fixed that for you.
2013-02-27 09:34:21 AM  
3 votes:
Good for her.  Glad there are still SOME people left in my current generation that give a crap about ANYTHING.  This school should be celebrating the fact that she's not on 16 and Pregnant, obsessed with Taylor Swift's newest ex, or trying to join some gang warfare in the South Bronx projects.

/Cheers ...
2013-02-27 09:33:55 AM  
3 votes:

Random Anonymous Blackmail: I DESERVE BETTER RIGHTS THAN YOU.


Do you work hard at being an asshole, or does it come naturally?
2013-02-27 09:30:56 AM  
3 votes:

spyderqueen: Okay, I'm not saying that this school isn't administrated by total assholes, but it's not like she got surprised with this suspension.  She knew it was the punishment she faced for doing this anyway.


Rosa Parks also knew the punishment she faced for doing what she did.
2013-02-27 02:22:00 PM  
2 votes:
14"x14" whiteboard, $18.49
Day of Silence T-Shirt, $15.00

Learning who the real bullies are...priceless
2013-02-27 10:43:07 AM  
2 votes:
It's "pink shirt" day here in Canada. You wear a pink shirt to school to show your support for anti-bullying.
Last year my seven year old son didn't wear a pink shirt to school. He was ostracized and "bullied" because of it.

Be careful when you fight the monsters, lest you become one.
2013-02-27 09:54:49 AM  
2 votes:
I am so annoyed with the LGBT moniker...
2013-02-27 09:49:06 AM  
2 votes:
...but the school's principal said "peaceful protests" were "against District Policy."

Wow. I mean, I've read my share of Nazi High School stories, I'm not exactly shocked by this, but to see it spelled out in such a way is pretty amazing.
2013-02-27 09:43:47 AM  
2 votes:
"She arrived to school on the following day wearing a red T-shirt with the message "DOS April 20, 2012: Shhhhh" and communicated using a dry-erase board. The dean of students punished Hatcher with an in-school suspension."
Sorry there sweetheart but using a dry-eraser board in all your classes to communicate IS a bit disruptive..........
2013-02-27 09:38:03 AM  
2 votes:
so she was told multiple times "the school doesn't take part in protests" and she did it anyways. now she is suing? i'm sure they will hand her and her parents some huge settlement pulled from the schools general fund. this is why our future generations are getting worse....
2013-02-27 09:36:27 AM  
2 votes:

dennysgod: FTA: She arrived to school on the following day wearing a red T-shirt with the message "DOS April 20, 2012: Shhhhh" and communicated using a dry-erase board.

There's little facts in this on-sided article but communicating with a dry-erase board when there was no physical or school sanction reason for it, is what probably lead to her ISS and not the t-shirt.


Oh no, the horror, a god damn dry erase board ... this is clearly a disruption to the learning environment! EXECUTE HER!
2013-02-27 09:27:07 AM  
2 votes:
Okay, I'm not saying that this school isn't administrated by total assholes, but it's not like she got surprised with this suspension.  She knew it was the punishment she faced for doing this anyway.
2013-02-27 02:05:53 PM  
1 votes:
Whatever. She's pretty hot.
2013-02-27 01:51:48 PM  
1 votes:

Ker_Thwap: You know seadoo2006, I think CeroX's advice is still valid even with your edit.  Fill in the blank with pretty much anything, and it's still solid advice.  When you have inflexible extremists championing a cause it's less convincing than having a spokesperson who's articulate and thoughtful.    To hyperbolize the example, abortion clinic bomber vs. Martin Luther King.  One is a footnote, one got something accomplished.


This is what I thought when the gay community responded to the whole Chik-fil-A Appreciation Day with the "kiss in" counter protest. All they did was give the bigots another reason to dislike them.

Personally, I thought the fact that Dan Cathy's comments became a scandal was in and of itself a sign of how far the country has moved forward on this issue. Ten years ago, it wouldn't have been a blip on the radar.

Another example, back in 1994 the TV show Roseanne fell into a whole heap of controversy over an episode where Mariel Hemingway gave Roseanne a kiss, which was obscured by the camera angle. Flash forward to 2011. Darren Criss plants a smooch directly on Chris Colfer's lips on Glee (both playing high school students), and the person who got into hot water over it was Victoria Jackson for calling it "disgusting".
2013-02-27 01:02:39 PM  
1 votes:

ciberido: CeroX: My wife is bi, and her best friend is a lesbian, my sister is a lesbian, and 2 of the 3 act like every day people who will openly talk about being bi and gay if the subject comes up and people who i normally hear talking down about gays and lesbians actually listen to what they have to say because they conduct themselves rationally,

Hey, you know what lesbians DON'T need?  Straight men mansplaining to them how to stand up for their rights.


Christ, we need an "Outraged Activists" bingo card. Must include "mansplaining".

/I'm on it!
2013-02-27 12:48:31 PM  
1 votes:

CeroX: And i KNOW the lgbt community have plenty of rallies that attempt to show people that there are people out there who aren't over the top, they get out there in normal clothes and hold up banners, but there are still, for lack of a better term, deviants out there who go to the extreme to make people uncomfortable and then demand that they act like nothing is wrong...


Well, I was surprised when you left out the parades earlier. Well you know what you don't get it. The pride parades aren't really about the politics those are for all the "deviants", even the ones that "attempt" not to be over the top. It's to celebrate the diversity and to show our own numbers and have fun.The politics takes place everyday.
2013-02-27 12:48:13 PM  
1 votes:

CeroX: My wife is bi, and her best friend is a lesbian, my sister is a lesbian, and 2 of the 3 act like every day people who will openly talk about being bi and gay if the subject comes up and people who i normally hear talking down about gays and lesbians actually listen to what they have to say because they conduct themselves rationally,


Hey, you know what lesbians DON'T need?  Straight men mansplaining to them how to stand up for their rights.
2013-02-27 12:43:47 PM  
1 votes:

tinfoil-hat maggie: xanadian: FTFA: An openly lesbian student on Tuesday sued her high school in Florida after she was suspended for participating in an anti-bullying event.

Awwww...look how cute the li'l lesbian is, thinking her "rights" matter. She's all growed up now!

I refer you to "Bong Hits 4 Jesus v. Alaska," sweetheart...

Wow, I'm surprised at you but yeah I can completely see the similarities in supporting what can be construed as an illegal and anti-bullying.


I'm just saying that there's already precedent for stomping on free speech rights for teens, no matter if it's for a good cause or not.

navylostboy: /hate that argument (better rights)


It's "better rights" because THOSE PEOPLE aren't really "people," so we're doing them a great service by giving them "better rights" that we GOOD and NORMAL people take for granted.
b3x
2013-02-27 12:31:44 PM  
1 votes:

El_Perro: Cybernetic: Also, I would argue that the whiteboard is a far more active protest than the black armbands in the original Tinker decision. Tinker allows restrictions where they are necessary to avoid substantial interference with school discipline or the rights of others. Communicating via whiteboard has the effect of slowing down the class and interfering with the lesson, which impacts all of the students in her classes, even those who have no interest in or involvement with the protest. It also draws attention of the other students away from the task at hand, and generally makes it more difficult for the teachers to do their jobs. IMHO, that qualifies as disruptive, and therefore can be prohibited under the Tinker test. The rest of the students have the right to go about their school day without having their classes impeded by this student's chosen form of protest.

The whiteboard certainly allows the school district to argue that his case is distinguishable from Tinker, and it's possible that a court would find the use of a whiteboard is sufficiently disruptive as to allow the school to prohibit it.  But, looking at what is alleged in the complaint (and at the document that are attached to the complaint), the school did not prohibited her protest because it was disruptive, but rather because it was a protest.  Rather, the school informed the student, when she sought permission in advance, that:

It is inconsistent with the district's past practice to approve student protests on any of our campuses.  [The student's request] is disapproved. . . . Since this is classified as a protest, . . . I will not approve the activity on our campuses.

The school informed the student that she would not be permitted to take part in this protext not because it was a disruptive protest, but simply because it was a protest, period.  In a later email, the school's principal informed all teachers at the school that:

[W]e have a group of students today who have an intention of protest ...


Bottom line, is it is a stupid attention whoring and disruptive PROTEST at a school. Public schools are not an appropriate place to be protesting. I can imagine that if a bunch of (insert organized religion)'s were organizing a DAY OF SILENCE because (insert their high power) wasn't getting enough airplay at school, then groups like the LGBT groups that are OMG OPPRESSION at this girls suspension would be all totally OK with it. The primary focus of public high schools is to educate kids enough that they can get into a college, where they can go join a activist cult and do all kinds of fun protests every night. It is not a venue for attention whores, no matter what their cause, to stir up the media and every other over the top nutjob. Really, I put this kind of crap right up there with Westboro Baptist Church ... it all amounts to the same thing: Media Terrorism. Purposely provoking a reaction, and then becoming a BLOG sensation. I hope we can look back on these days, and lament our hyper-sensationalizing every kid who gets suspended from school for doing something they were told not to do.
2013-02-27 11:54:59 AM  
1 votes:

El_Perro: It is clear from these emails that the school's intent (and the school's policy) was not simply to prohibit disruptive protests. The school's policy was an absolute prohibition of any protests, in any form. The school's description of the student's conduct does not mention the whiteboard, only the t-shirt (her conduct after being sent to the office is irrelevant, as there was no indication that it occurred among other students or disrupted other students, and in any event she had already been sent to the office for the shirt). While Tinker has been narrowed somewhat in the 40+ years since it was decided, an absolute prohibition of student protests, including the wearing of any "placard in protest of an issue" is clearly inconsistent with the First Amendment, as the Court has applied it in the school context.


Supreme Court jurisprudence has far more to say about lewd speech and drug-related speech than it does about protests or political speech (Papish, Bethel, Hazelwood, and Morse). But those rulings clearly establish that students in school do not have the same First Amendment rights as adults in other settings.

The Tinker decision hinges on the idea that the wearing of armbands was "entirely divorced from actually or potentially disruptive conduct," and refers to their conduct as "silent, passive expression of opinion, unaccompanied by any disorder or disturbance."

The whole concept of the Day of Silence appears to be an attempt to adhere to the letter of the Tinker decision while defying its spirit. Keeping silent adheres to the Tinker standard of "silent, passive expression". Communication by whiteboard is significantly slower than speaking, and thus inherently disruptive to the flow of instruction, and also serves to draw attention to the protester, and therefore constitutes a "disorder or disturbance".

The lawsuit itself admits that the student knew that she could not "materially and substantially disrupt the school environment or the rights of others," and describes the Day of Silence as "inherently expressive" and "a day of action." I find it difficult to reconcile that first statement with the other two.

The school's report may not mention the whiteboard, but that doesn't mean that the presence and use of the whiteboard was not disruptive or relevant to her removal from class.
2013-02-27 11:16:33 AM  
1 votes:
seadoo2006

Not sure what you are trying to accomplish here, but if you are saying that having black skin is what defines a black person instead of their actions, then i think you missed the point...

Actions define a person not skin color or sexual preference...
2013-02-27 11:13:11 AM  
1 votes:
You go to school to learn, not be an attention whore. Dont want to talk the whole day? Call in sick and stay home. The shirt did not get her suspended subby, it was her refusal to communicate verbaly

/some people want more rights than other it seems.
2013-02-27 11:08:45 AM  
1 votes:

Cybernetic: Also, I would argue that the whiteboard is a far more active protest than the black armbands in the original Tinker decision. Tinker allows restrictions where they are necessary to avoid substantial interference with school discipline or the rights of others. Communicating via whiteboard has the effect of slowing down the class and interfering with the lesson, which impacts all of the students in her classes, even those who have no interest in or involvement with the protest. It also draws attention of the other students away from the task at hand, and generally makes it more difficult for the teachers to do their jobs. IMHO, that qualifies as disruptive, and therefore can be prohibited under the Tinker test. The rest of the students have the right to go about their school day without having their classes impeded by this student's chosen form of protest.


The whiteboard certainly allows the school district to argue that his case is distinguishable from Tinker, and it's possible that a court would find the use of a whiteboard is sufficiently disruptive as to allow the school to prohibit it.  But, looking at what is alleged in the complaint (and at the document that are attached to the complaint), the school did not prohibited her protest because it was disruptive, but rather because it was a protest.  Rather, the school informed the student, when she sought permission in advance, that:

It is inconsistent with the district's past practice to approve student protests on any of our campuses.  [The student's request] is disapproved. . . . Since this is classified as a protest, . . . I will not approve the activity on our campuses.

The school informed the student that she would not be permitted to take part in this protext not because it was a disruptive protest, but simply because it was a protest, period.  In a later email, the school's principal informed all teachers at the school that:

[W]e have a group of students today who have an intention of protesting.  The district has an absolute policy against protesting on school campuses.  If you have students who are wearing placard in protest of an issue . . . please notify the dean or administration, and we will handle it.

Finally, after the protest, the principal described the student's conduct thusly:

Amber Hatcher [the student in question] was dressed in a shirt protesting the occasion.  When her teacher sent her up to the office she was belligerent to the Dean.  She initially refused to answer then refused to step into IR [presumably, IR = in-school-suspension].  She was talked to and did finally give the phone numbers of her parents.  She was placed in IR for the day as they could not be reached.

It is clear from these emails that the school's intent (and the school's policy) was not simply to prohibit disruptive protests.  The school's policy was an absolute prohibition of any protests, in any form.  The school's description of the student's conduct does not mention the whiteboard, only the t-shirt (her conduct after being sent to the office is irrelevant, as there was no indication that it occurred among other students or disrupted other students, and in any event she had already been sent to the office for the shirt).  While Tinker has been narrowed somewhat in the 40+ years since it was decided, an absolute prohibition of student protests, including the wearing of any "placard in protest of an issue" is clearly inconsistent with the First Amendment, as the Court has applied it in the school context.
2013-02-27 11:00:45 AM  
1 votes:
CeroX: b3x: It is really just like anyone else is is completely obsessed with some topic

I've said this a thousand times to my family and friends who are LGBT black:

The smartest thing to get the rights you want passed, is to STOP with the overboard posturing. Stop throwing it in people faces, stop with the attention whoring, and stop being over the top with the pride. The only thing it's doing is making people resent your lifestyle. At this point, the big city pride NAACP rallies that feature men in assless chaps riding a giant pink penis black people rapping down main street for the past 30 years has turned people away from even hearing what you have to say about the topic. The same thing goes for marijuana, stop having the burnt out pot heads being your primary voice on the matter... You want people to take the issue seriously, start publicly acting like a sane, and rational everyday people and not acting like being gay/pothead black is the ONLY thing that defines you as a person...

My wife is bi mixed, and her best friend is a lesbian black, my sister is a lesbian black, and 2 of the 3 act like every day people who will openly talk about being bi and gay black if the subject comes up and people who i normally hear talking down about gays and lesbians blacks actually listen to what they have to say because they conduct themselves rationally, unlike the other person in the group who goes out of her way to throw it in everyone's faces, goes out of her way to be an attention whore, and who thinks being gay black is what defines you as a person, instead of being a person who has a sexual racial preference to the same sex race
2013-02-27 10:47:25 AM  
1 votes:

Theaetetus: Cybernetic: jack21221: Schools really need to lighten up. They had to have known that this was a legal minefield. Just let the student peacefully protest that day and get on with it.

IIRC, under the Supreme Court's Tinker v. Des Moines decision, an institution (such as a school) has a right to restrict activities (which may include speech) that are outside the purpose of that institution.

So, as admirable as the purpose of the student might be, from a legal standpoint she is not necessarily in the right.

/IANAL

Respectfully, that's almost 100% backwards. In Tinker, the Supreme Court held that a school could not punish a student wearing a black armband as a Vietnam protest, absent any evidence that the punishment was necessary to avoid substantial interference with school discipline or the rights of others. As they said in that decision:
"First Amendment rights, applied in light of the special characteristics of the school environment, are available to teachers and students. It can hardly be argued that either students or teachers shed their constitutional rights to freedom of speech or expression at the schoolhouse gate. This has been the unmistakable holding of this Court for almost 50 years. "

The white board is the only distinction here, but I'd say Tinker still applies. Specifically, the holding in Tinker noted that:
"The school officials banned and sought to punish petitioners for a silent, passive expression of opinion, unaccompanied by any disorder or disturbance on the part of petitioners. There is here no evidence whatever of petitioners' interference, actual or nascent, with the schools' work or of collision with the rights of other students to be secure and to be let alone. Accordingly, this case does not concern speech or action that intrudes upon the work of the schools or the rights of other students."
Similarly, use of a white board is a silent protest, unaccompanied by any disorder or disturbance.

Further, I'd be willing to bet that the school doesn't suspend kids who are deaf or mute and communicate via writing. This was a punishment specifically because of the student's political views.


A deaf/mute example doesn't apply because it's an accommodation for a disability, and has nothing to do with any form of protest.

Also, I would argue that the whiteboard is a far more active protest than the black armbands in the original Tinker decision. Tinker allows restrictions where they are necessary to avoid substantial interference with school discipline or the rights of others. Communicating via whiteboard has the effect of slowing down the class and interfering with the lesson, which impacts all of the students in her classes, even those who have no interest in or involvement with the protest. It also draws attention of the other students away from the task at hand, and generally makes it more difficult for the teachers to do their jobs. IMHO, that qualifies as disruptive, and therefore can be prohibited under the Tinker test. The rest of the students have the right to go about their school day without having their classes impeded by this student's chosen form of protest.
2013-02-27 10:40:22 AM  
1 votes:

WhippingBoy: Take away the "activism" and they're left with nothing.


You know actually you're right, and if it hadn't been for activism we'd still have a legal system more anti-homosexual than those of some Warsaw Pact countries.
2013-02-27 10:39:25 AM  
1 votes:

Random Anonymous Blackmail: jack21221

Schools really need to lighten up. They had to have known that this was a legal minefield. Just let the student peacefully protest that day and get on with it.

Agreed, but also the spoiled snowflakes start stomping their feet and kicking up dust when they are not getting the attention they think they deserve. It sounds a lot like "no one is paying attention to me" PAY ATTENTION TO ME I'M A LESBIAN AND I DESERVE BETTER RIGHTS THAN YOU.

I blame the parents.


better rights?   I'm sure this was slammed above this, but what exactly are the "better rights"?

the right to go to school to learn
the right to bring an age appropriate date to a school social function
the right not to have a living hell of a school experience day in and day out?
the right to not be shunned by the administration and the students for being different?
oh i know its her first amendment rights, those are the better ones.... right?

/hate that argument (better rights)
// its the SAME rights... stupid idjit
///comes in threes
2013-02-27 10:31:32 AM  
1 votes:
I think a lot of you want the school to be in the morality business and just sneak it in under the auspices of civics.  It's kind of amusing watching the liberals try this same kind of crap that the conservatives used to pull.

I have a strong suspicion that that school already has anti bullying policies and education.  Slacktivist girl should have approached the administration and asked how she could participate on one of the already ongoing programs.  Instead she put herself on the same level of a student who chose to wear an "abortion is murder" t-shirt.  Vastly different message of course, but choosing to deliver it in the same inappropriate manner.

The policy protects this girl from having to put up other peoples crazy beliefs, and it protects the other students from having to put up with her every belief.
2013-02-27 10:28:14 AM  
1 votes:

b3x: at some point the LGBT community is going to come to the realization that society doesn't hate them for being LGBT, we are just annoyed that some wont SHUT THE FARK UP about being LGBT. It is really just like anyone else is is completely obsessed with some topic, that they just won't shut up about ... people roll their eyes and walk away, and then make fun of them at the water cooler. It isn't about who they are having sex with, it's about having something to talk about other than your lifestyle. Work on your social skills, and stop being so farking angry.

PETA is the same way. Yes we all agree that animals shouldn't be abused, but really your totally over the top. Ease up.


Not gonna happen. These are the only things that give meaning to these people's poor, tragic, lives of desperation. Take away the "activism" and they're left with nothing.
2013-02-27 10:17:08 AM  
1 votes:

xanadian: FTFA: An openly lesbian student on Tuesday sued her high school in Florida after she was suspended for participating in an anti-bullying event.

Awwww...look how cute the li'l lesbian is, thinking her "rights" matter. She's all growed up now!

I refer you to "Bong Hits 4 Jesus v. Alaska," sweetheart...


This. It's not your grandma's Tinker.

/I don't agree with "Bong Hits", but it's the trend
//are we still hating on homeschooling?
2013-02-27 10:15:54 AM  
1 votes:

vudukungfu: The principal also called her parents to tell them their daughter was prohibited from participating in the National Day of Silence.

I'm afraid if it were my daughter, the principal and I would be having a one way conversation and his head would get put on straight.
He would receive one verbal warning from me, apologize to my kid, and STFU after that.
Or he'd be in court, losing. A lot.
I'd get an uppity high profile lawyer and tell him, tear flesh and you get 90%.


This ... I would've been the parent telling him to get farked.
2013-02-27 10:10:57 AM  
1 votes:
We had these back when I was in school. The administration sent out announcements so that students wouldn't get in trouble.

It's a good civics lesson. It's an opportunity for History and English teachers to talk about the history of civil rights and peaceful protest. It's an opportunity to address bullying and discrimination.

Any school administrator too dense or narrow-minded to understand that this is part of their job description should be thrown out on their butt. It's also important to understand that allowing the students a little bit of a release like this prevents more serious infractions from occurring; did they fall asleep for four years when they were being taught this?
2013-02-27 10:05:46 AM  
1 votes:
I am sure many of my fellow Farkers will think I am a jerk (as if they didn't already), but I will throw in my 2 cents. I support gay/lesbian rights, marriage, adoption, etc. However, there is a difference between expressing your views and grandstanding. I feel pretty sure the entire school and most of the community realize Amber is a lesbian by now. Some will agree with her, some will not. It is Florida after all. I appreciate her courage to voice her opinion and to stand up for what is right in a free society. However, I hardly think she is a trailblazer in her plight. Sometimes the best way to get point across is to act like a human being instead of a lesbian human being. They already know her sexual orientation so there is no reason keep banging that drum. It is kind of the reverse Streisand effect. She is bringing it out to the public and media likes she wants, but she risks many people just thinking she is an attention whore that is looking for her 15 minutes of martyrdom.

This really isn't much different than from pulling out the ole race card, when race had nothing to do with a certain situation.
2013-02-27 10:01:04 AM  
1 votes:
I have another gem for ya. A friend of mind was kicked out of a pep rally and suspended for holding up a posterboard that said, "Who cares?" You would expect that in Texas, but not NJ. I wish we had protest that.

I work in a school system now that has an active GSA. Our television program ran a commercial actively promoting the Day of Silence and encouraging more kids to participate - in an INNER CITY SCHOOL - not some posh suburban land of entitled snowflakes. I think Florida and Texas just have to grow up.
2013-02-27 09:58:32 AM  
1 votes:
Oh, come on. It's not special rights or snowflake syndrome.  It's one kid wearing an inoffensive t-shirt and keeping quiet for one day. I participated (along with many others) when I was in school.  And guess what - nobody gave a shiat.  We were allowed to feel like we were upholding our beliefs and convictions, and the lunchroom was way quieter for a day.

I wonder how her civics teacher took that whole 'peaceful protest against policy' nonsense.  We're teaching kids. Teaching. So when the administrators do this stupid shiat, what are we teaching them? To not ask questions, to not stand up peacefully to defend their beliefs? To just lay down and do what you're told?  Sounds like a republican to me.
2013-02-27 09:56:07 AM  
1 votes:
I went to high school 89-93 in North Jersey. If this had happened then, other students would have joined in the protest and there would have been fire alarms pulled and a walk-out. Although, more than half the students participating would have done so not for the cause, but for the fun of making a ruckus. We didn't have a gay-staight alliance, but we had an Amnesty Chapter in the school that no doubt would have organized something. We even had an organized protest against the "no hats" rule. I personally reported a NJ-DEP violation. We loved stirring stuff up. But, that's the Northeast for ya.

There was a day I communicated with a note-pad. I had lost my voice. Instead of being punished, my classmates and teachers were only mildly amused.

Good for her for filing a law suit. It's public school. They have to allow this sort of expression. Folks who have a problem with it should send their kids to private religious schools or home school.
2013-02-27 09:54:07 AM  
1 votes:

pDiablo: happens every day..some people are just blind to it cos its not minority race related so aint news worthy.and we dont jump up and down screaming about rights and descrimination


I would expect a straight, white hardworking family man could speak American better.
2013-02-27 09:53:07 AM  
1 votes:
AW gets support because she claims to be gay. News at 10, 11, and 12
2013-02-27 09:51:41 AM  
1 votes:
What's the possibility of there being legal precedent that will finally bring down the hammer upon schools who use that pathetic "it's a distraction" excuse to get away with their fascist behaviors.
2013-02-27 09:50:21 AM  
1 votes:

Coolfusis:
When a straight, white hardworking family man gets tied to a post and beaten to death just for being a straight, white hardworking family man, we'll give you your own day.


www.weirdspace.dk
2013-02-27 09:48:21 AM  
1 votes:

Coolfusis: pDiablo: hmm lets see, gay pride, lesbian day, hmm oh yes notting hill carnival ( celebration weekend for afro carrbibean culture..hey how about this one... Straight, white hardworking family man day..gimme a date and we'll make it so...

When a straight, white hardworking family man gets tied to a post and beaten to death just for being a straight, white hardworking family man, we'll give you your own day.


happens every day..some people are just blind to it cos its not minority race related so aint news worthy.and we dont jump up and down screaming about rights and descrimination
2013-02-27 09:44:45 AM  
1 votes:

DarkVader: spyderqueen: Okay, I'm not saying that this school isn't administrated by total assholes, but it's not like she got surprised with this suspension.  She knew it was the punishment she faced for doing this anyway.

No.

An unconstitutional action taken by a public school is no less unconstitutional because the school announced it ahead of time.


Until Tinker is marginalized into "this is a different world, and a disruption is a disruption".

I'm waiting for someone at the ACLU to be arrested and changed because a lawsuit is considered a 'disruption of school'.
2013-02-27 09:36:13 AM  
1 votes:
She got in school suspension. Big deal. She still got to go to school and do her work and not have it count against her attendance. Big farking deal.
2013-02-27 09:35:22 AM  
1 votes:
FTA: She arrived to school on the following day wearing a red T-shirt with the message "DOS April 20, 2012: Shhhhh" and communicated using a dry-erase board.

There's little facts in this on-sided article but communicating with a dry-erase board when there was no physical or school sanction reason for it, is what probably lead to her ISS and not the t-shirt.
2013-02-27 09:35:19 AM  
1 votes:
Who would bully a teen lesbian? They're our most precious resource. Well teen bisexuals are anyway.
2013-02-27 09:34:06 AM  
1 votes:

AphoticStar: spyderqueen: Okay, I'm not saying that this school isn't administrated by total assholes, but it's not like she got surprised with this suspension.  She knew it was the punishment she faced for doing this anyway.

Rosa Parks also knew the punishment she faced for doing what she did.


She also accepted that punishment and didn't sue anyone.
2013-02-27 09:30:23 AM  
1 votes:
It's not clear at all why the administration turned this into such a major issue. Or why the teacher sent her to the principal for such a minor disobedient act. She was using a whiteboard to communicate.

It's not even that I think she should be allowed to get away with anything, but in this case what exactly are they trying to pin on this girl?

It's ridiculous.
2013-02-27 09:30:01 AM  
1 votes:
www.posterenvy.com
 
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