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(The Atlantic)   After WW2   (theatlantic.com) divider line 16
    More: Cool, World War III, Hermann Goering, Arab-Israeli, incendiary bombs, End of World War II in Europe, Pan-Germanism, Wehrmacht, proliferation of nuclear weapons  
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17645 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Feb 2013 at 4:07 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-27 02:58:43 AM
7 votes:

Frederick: Elvis_Bogart: Frederick: My grandfather secretly took some pictures of Nagasaki two days after the bombing from a military surveillance plane.  I have been trying to decide what to do with those pics.....

Would they be considered "classified" or still secret?

It was a secret to his superiors -not authorized.  I kind of worry he could posthumously be disciplined for them.  He was highly honored and I wouldnt want that jeopardized.  But they are incredible pictures of the devastation.


I'd contact the Library of Congress and/or the Smithsonian.  The photos are an important historical record that should be preserved and made available.

Do you really think they'd posthumously discipline a vet?  That would be a PR nightmare.  It won't happen.

CSB:  Some years back, I was doing document review in a state's archives.  In one of the boxes, I turned up an original copy of the Thirteenth Amendment that had been sent to that state for ratification.  Original signature from Seward, too.

Holy crap.

It got passed around my team for a few minutes so we could all say that we had held and read it.

Then I took it to the director of the archives and told him what it was.  Eyes went wide.  It ended up in their special collection with climate control and futzy treatment.  Am still proud that it got the treatment it deserved while still in excellent condition.

Do the same with your photos.  They deserve it.
2013-02-27 08:28:37 AM
2 votes:
Neutralizing Germany and Japan's military power forced them to become economic powers instead.

Meanwhile, here in the US, we kept our military overpowered, and gave the civilians suburbs and teevee.
2013-02-27 07:40:42 AM
2 votes:

Fizpez: My great-uncle Tony was one of the guards at Nuremberg - there's a large picture (similar to #10) hanging in my great aunts living room.

/short CSB i know...


Before or after the allies got there?
2013-02-27 05:26:28 AM
2 votes:
I don't think that most people (including myself and I'm 54) has any idea what that generation went through on both sides.  This is one reason I do and will always respect old people.  It wasn't just a military war like all of them have been since.  It was one that everyone was involved in and did withiout. 

God bless them all.
2013-02-27 06:51:15 PM
1 votes:

Baron Harkonnen: one of my grandfathers helped liberate belsen and after that they quit taking german pow's

In that case your grandfather should have been executed for war crimes like that German general.


silly scheisskopf, only the losers ever get tried for war crimes
2013-02-27 06:36:28 PM
1 votes:

Man On Pink Corner: Fantastic work on the Atlantic's part.  The sort of page that makes you feel a bit guilty if you don't click on the ads.

I think the most sobering photos are the ones showing the Soviets returning home.  The Sudeten Germans being frog-marched out of their homes, the vanquished and shamed Japanese, hell, even the Nazis on trial at Nuremberg look happier than the victorious Soviet soldiers, marching home toward something worse than war.

Almost every one of these photos carries a "Hey, we seriously shouldn't do anything like this to ourselves again, ever" subtext, but the photos with the Soviets are the only ones that make me afraid for humanity.



The pick of the orphans in Poland deeply saddens me.  There's an angle you don't see much, the children who were left behind.  Tragic stuff.
2013-02-27 09:05:28 AM
1 votes:

poot_rootbeer: Neutralizing Germany and Japan's military power forced them to become economic powers instead.



All with new equipment and factories we paid for and helped build.
2013-02-27 08:50:33 AM
1 votes:

Harry Freakstorm: [cdn.theatlantic.com image 850x556]

Looks like the captain has a smart phone. "Siri, will this cardboard standee of Anton Dostler fool people?"

No sir, It looks clearly photoshopped.

"I have no idea what you said, Siri."

I mean it won't work. In 2013, some a-hole will discover the ruse and find out Anton lived and became Marlon Brando.

"Shoot.... I mean hold yer fire!"


Want to really blow your mind(no pun intended)?

I went to wikipedia, and they have before and after photos

And  this.

never thought I would see a snuff vid on youtube
2013-02-27 08:15:26 AM
1 votes:
cdn.theatlantic.com

Looks like the captain has a smart phone. "Siri, will this cardboard standee of Anton Dostler fool people?"

No sir, It looks clearly photoshopped.

"I have no idea what you said, Siri."

I mean it won't work. In 2013, some a-hole will discover the ruse and find out Anton lived and became Marlon Brando.

"Shoot.... I mean hold yer fire!"
2013-02-27 07:59:58 AM
1 votes:
My great uncle died at Auschwitz.

He got drunk and fell out of the guard tower
2013-02-27 07:37:40 AM
1 votes:
He chose poorly.


cdn.theatlantic.com
2013-02-27 06:49:50 AM
1 votes:
Note for myself: Never read comments under the article.
2013-02-27 05:52:16 AM
1 votes:
Some of those Japanese tried and sentenced to severe war-crime punishments were convicted of waterboarding.

My, how times have changed.  Maybe we should pardon them.
2013-02-27 05:35:02 AM
1 votes:
i.dailymail.co.uk
2013-02-27 05:32:55 AM
1 votes:
You know who else liked looking at pictures of WWII?
2013-02-27 04:05:50 AM
1 votes:

L.D. Ablo: Frederick: Elvis_Bogart: Frederick: My grandfather secretly took some pictures of Nagasaki two days after the bombing from a military surveillance plane.  I have been trying to decide what to do with those pics.....

Would they be considered "classified" or still secret?

It was a secret to his superiors -not authorized.  I kind of worry he could posthumously be disciplined for them.  He was highly honored and I wouldnt want that jeopardized.  But they are incredible pictures of the devastation.

I'd contact the Library of Congress and/or the Smithsonian.  The photos are an important historical record that should be preserved and made available.

Do you really think they'd posthumously discipline a vet?  That would be a PR nightmare.  It won't happen.



My father never made the pictures public because he suspects there may be something sensitive in the photos.  There is a reason my grandfather took the pics, and it wasnt purely out of curiosity or novelty.

An anonymous donation to the Smithsonian is an option I hadnt considered -thanks.
 
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