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(CBS Houston)   Louisiana hunters donate 1600 pounds of venison to local homeless shelter. The Health Dept shows their thanks by dumping all the properly processed and packaged meat in a dumpster and pouring Clorox on it   (houston.cbslocal.com) divider line 54
    More: Dumbass, homeless shelters, Clorox, hunters donate, venison, Department of Health, state department of health  
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17697 clicks; posted to Main » on 27 Feb 2013 at 3:22 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-27 12:05:50 AM
15 votes:
Well, to be fair, it probably wouldn't have been up to the standards of the usual irradiated, pink slime-laden, hormone and chemical filled grade Z meat they usually give the homeless.
2013-02-27 03:46:38 AM
6 votes:
It's the law. We couldn't donate leftovers from restaurants I have worked at unless officials picked it up themselves.

Raw foods have always been no go's at shelters.

It only takes one deer having a buck shot in its belly to lead to a lawsuit by some homeless class action group.

It sucks but a ten minute phone call would have saved time and probably would have given them an opportunity to donate it properly.
2013-02-27 12:30:44 AM
5 votes:
Chain of custody for meat. It's a thing.

/There are services out where I used to live that would work with police departments to help clean up *fresh* deer hits. If the animal was intact they would come and get it, process it, sell 1/2 and the other 1/2 went to the shelter to help feed the homeless or disadvantaged.

//Used to have to throw away UNGODLY amounts of food when I was a store clerk. It's the law. Even if that milk is good for another week, I can't even GIVE it to you if it is expired.
2013-02-27 05:42:17 AM
4 votes:

Shadow Blasko: Chain of custody for meat. It's a thing.



This.

Sorry, man, but to certify meat as safe you've got to the be licensed and regularly inspected and shiat, legally people can't go on your pinky-swear that you totally prepared it properly for reals.

That standard is only sufficient for feeding yourself, your family, your guests, etc.  I guess you could invite all the homeless over to your house for dinner if you really want to foll with this.

//If we used x-ray pasteurization like rational people this wouldn't be a problem, food bank could just have a machine, zap shiat for a few seconds, and then it'd be safe to eat raw if you were so inclined.  But NOOOOooooOOOOoooo, old and stupid people are afraid of anything with the word "radiation" in it.
2013-02-27 04:08:17 AM
4 votes:

crabsno termites: LowbrowDeluxe: You don't just go randomly making exceptions to food safety regulations because someone's a heck of a guy.

How did the world survive before Upton Sinclair?


With much higher mortality rates and disease?
2013-02-27 03:59:15 AM
4 votes:

ModernLuddite: Sinclair, Upton. "The Jungle". 1906.


Came here to say this.  'Oh, but we're hunters, and know what we're doing, and good Samaritans, so it's totally different.'  No it isn't.  You don't just go randomly making exceptions to food safety regulations because someone's a heck of a guy.  "Hey, Vinnie's Little Italy Concrete Co wants to give us a new foundation for a homeless shelter free, he seems legit and it's for charity, I saw we let him do it without any building inspections."
2013-02-27 02:39:10 AM
4 votes:
WTF is wrong with you people?

/is it merely bureaucracy run amok, or just pure malevolence?
//even Jesus would backhand you
2013-02-27 05:54:33 AM
3 votes:

Friction8r: How sweet it will be when we have a crisis like a major earthquake that shuts down distribution to many major cities. Those in the woods will enjoy their venison, and the entitled snobs in the city will starve. No aragula for you.


The whole "greens are a delicacy enjoyed by urban elites I hate" thing is really precious. Greens have always been eaten by poor rural folk because they essentially grow wild. Not because the poor rural folk are hipsters.

Also, arugula tastes good to some people.

But don't let that stop you from fapping to the sweet, sweer dream of famine in the cities.
2013-02-27 04:35:24 AM
3 votes:

crabsno termites: We're still dying, aren't we? Yes, at a somewhat slower rate, but so what?


we also survived before modern medicine too, that doesn't mean we should chuck out chemotherapy and aspirin. That our species survived inspite of something isn't a reason to dismiss advances since then.
2013-02-27 04:19:46 AM
3 votes:

crabsno termites: Survived, didn't we?


some of us did. Others died.
2013-02-27 03:33:34 AM
3 votes:
deer is not really cleared for public consuming according to FDA and bureaucratic crap like that. what this basically boils down to is more cities are working to make life hell on the homeless so they will get out of town. the fewer riff raff, the better the property value.
2013-02-27 03:30:00 AM
3 votes:
when i was in 8th grade i worked at a Diner across the highway from my house. witnessed the owner buy large grey plastic tubs of burger patties from a stranger in the parking lot. out of a station wagon. unrefrigerated, and no tops on the tubs. i doubt this is the only time this type of thing has happened in the USA.

--these people destroying the venison were wrong. you cook that meat properly you have no problem. shame on them for wasting and taking food from the hungry.
2013-02-27 01:37:56 AM
3 votes:

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Well, at least a shiatload of deer were killed for fun.


better than in my cars hood at 70 mph.
2013-02-27 01:13:13 AM
3 votes:
Well, at least a shiatload of deer were killed for fun.
2013-02-27 12:54:15 AM
3 votes:

Shadow Blasko: Chain of custody for meat. It's a thing.


On one hand, I can see how it's a major waste of good food. On the other, there's a legitimate reason for extreme risk aversion when it comes to food that can make people sick or possibly kill them... especially a "sensitive" population like the poor/homeless.
2013-02-26 11:59:10 PM
3 votes:
"there is no way to verify how the deer were killed, prepared or stored."

Yeah but it's for the poor so who gives a fnck, right?
2013-02-27 08:22:35 AM
2 votes:

crabsno termites: How did the world survive before Upton Sinclair?


The world survived just fine.  Many people, unfortunately, did not.
2013-02-27 04:41:01 AM
2 votes:

crabsno termites: log_jammin: crabsno termites: Survived, didn't we?

some of us did. Others died.

We're still dying, aren't we? Yes, at a somewhat slower rate, but so what?


Look, if you're all good with having the occasional bit of worker who fell in the grinder mixed in with your ground chuck, more power to you.  I for one like a set of standards to be in place and am happy to pay for it.
2013-02-27 04:17:48 AM
2 votes:

crabsno termites: LowbrowDeluxe: You don't just go randomly making exceptions to food safety regulations because someone's a heck of a guy.



How did the world survive before Upton Sinclair?


Some with one arm, some with serious food poisoning, some as orphans.

It is quite a boring book in terms of story but honestly it made me not want to eat processed meat for like a week.
2013-02-27 04:00:47 AM
2 votes:
For the people whining about bureaucracy and the big bad government:

Should there be rules on food donated to homeless shelters?
2013-02-27 03:51:21 AM
2 votes:

FirstNationalBastard: Well, to be fair, it probably wouldn't have been up to the standards of the usual irradiated, pink slime-laden, hormone and chemical filled grade Z meat they usually give the homeless.


And small children. McNugget Happy Meal, it's safe, it's sanitised, it's almost meat!
2013-02-27 03:33:45 AM
2 votes:

kingoomieiii: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Well, at least a shiatload of deer were killed for fun.

1,600 lbs is like three deer.


Wrong.
2013-02-27 03:25:56 AM
2 votes:
FTFA:  "we must protect the people . . ."

When has any level of gov't been concerned about the people?
2013-02-27 04:16:11 PM
1 votes:

BarkingUnicorn: So the health dept. saved the homeless from the Teatard hunters' vile plot to poison the homeless.  Thanks, Bobby Jindal!

The licensed slaughterhouse presumably prepared and packaged the meat properly.  If hunters are allowed to eat their kills then the distinction between wild and farm-raised  deer is irrelevant from a food safety standpoint.  The shelter's kitchen is surely regulated. The only real concern is how the meat got from the slaughterhouse to the shelter.  Did it travel in a regulated refrigerated truck or in the back of hunters' pickup trucks?


Not really. Like i said, theres a reason slaughter is regulated as well as the processing, and why, in a slaughterhouse, processing immediately follows slaughter. The concern with wild game to some extent is what happened between the kill and the processor, and also before the kill. Was the deer head shot? Neck shot? Gut shot? Was it field dressed? Was it hung for a few days? Did it sit in the back of somebodys pickup truck for a week in the sun? In what area was the deer shot? Where did it migrate from? What heard was it a part of? The law isnt perfect, and this case is probably a misapplication of it, but there are very specific reasons for these sorts of regulations.
2013-02-27 04:00:56 PM
1 votes:

Aigoo: Do you suppose any of those "advances" might have something to do with the skyrocketing cancer rates, allergy rates, and increased sensitivities to things like wheat and proteins within foods?


except the rates aren't skyrocketing. the disagnosis are skyrocketing because we're better at diagnosing things. we're no more sensitive to things like wheat than we were when Aretaeus first described it in the 2nd century (and thats just the first written description. The difference now is that the kids don't just die from it.
2013-02-27 02:39:51 PM
1 votes:
The nine most terrifying words in the English language...

'I'm from the government and I'm here to help.'
2013-02-27 02:12:06 PM
1 votes:

Phinn: Isn't that what the cooking is for?


you can't remove all potential diseases through cooking wild game and even in some cases handling bad meat can be a problem. There was an article a few days back about people getting very sick handling infected rabbit carcase.
2013-02-27 01:39:21 PM
1 votes:

BarkingUnicorn: So the health dept. saved the homeless from the Teatard hunters' vile plot to poison the homeless.  Thanks, Bobby Jindal!

The licensed slaughterhouse presumably prepared and packaged the meat properly.  If hunters are allowed to eat their kills then the distinction between wild and farm-raised  deer is irrelevant from a food safety standpoint.  The shelter's kitchen is surely regulated. The only real concern is how the meat got from the slaughterhouse to the shelter.  Did it travel in a regulated refrigerated truck or in the back of hunters' pickup trucks?


This is the problem.  Wild game cannot even be in a licensed and inspected kitchen.  There is no provenance on the meat.  The animal may have been diseased, infected, or full of parasites.  If this was someone cooking in a private home kitchen, it wouldn't be news.  If you ever see venison on a menu, it came from a farm in Scotland, or New Zealand.
2013-02-27 11:44:41 AM
1 votes:

JustGetItRight: Dafatone: JustGetItRight: Hobo Jr.: It's the law. We couldn't donate leftovers from restaurants I have worked at unless officials picked it up themselves.

Raw foods have always been no go's at shelters.

It only takes one deer having a buck shot in its belly to lead to a lawsuit by some homeless class action group.

It sucks but a ten minute phone call would have saved time and probably would have given them an opportunity to donate it properly.

Bullshait.  Many states have donation programs for food banks and they work just fine.

What happened here was an overreach by a power tripping bureaucrat.  They're "now working with hunters in ways to donate extra game to homeless shelters" in a desperate attempt to keep the state legislature from restricting their authority.

No, what happened was someone carrying out the law.  If the law's wrong, which in this case it probably is, working to change it is a good idea, which is what seems to be happening now.

You can't just ignore health codes.  Unless you think health codes for food donated to homeless shelters are a bad idea.

It isn't ignored.  The meat wasn't just shot, hung outside the door, and field dressed on the spot.  It came from processors, which appear to be licensed and inspected in LA.

http://www.ldaf.state.la.us/portal/Offices/AnimalHealthandFoodSafety /F ederalStateMeatPrograms/ApplyingforInspection/tabid/294/Default.aspx


Prove the bolded didnt happen prior to it being dropped off at the processor. Theres reasons the USDA regulates the slaughter of animals as well as just the processing. Yes these processors are all certified and certainly on the up and up, but they process YOUR kill for YOU. I have a lot of friends who hunt, when they get a deer, they take it to a processor, get steaks, burgers, sausage, etc back. The processor is charging them for the service, the meat is for their personal (and friends and family) consumption. If you own a restaurant or a butcher shop or something, you CAN NOT sell deer you have bagged yourself regardless of who processed it. If you see game; elk, deer, etc, on the menu somewhere, it is not wild game, it was farm raised, on a USDA inspected farm, or inspected by the USDA/FDA upon import.

The issue here is really if there should be a distinction on prohibition of third party consumption of wild game when its donated instead of sold. As it stands now, legally, the meat is not suitable for PUBLIC consumption, this is a similar issue as donating expired, but not spoiled, food.

Seriously, if you see venison for sale somewhere reputable, its not white tail from the next county, chances are its from a ranch in New Zealand.

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/FACTSheets/Farm_Raised_Game/index.asp
2013-02-27 11:31:50 AM
1 votes:

JustGetItRight: Dafatone: JustGetItRight: Hobo Jr.: It's the law. We couldn't donate leftovers from restaurants I have worked at unless officials picked it up themselves.

Raw foods have always been no go's at shelters.

It only takes one deer having a buck shot in its belly to lead to a lawsuit by some homeless class action group.

It sucks but a ten minute phone call would have saved time and probably would have given them an opportunity to donate it properly.

Bullshait.  Many states have donation programs for food banks and they work just fine.

What happened here was an overreach by a power tripping bureaucrat.  They're "now working with hunters in ways to donate extra game to homeless shelters" in a desperate attempt to keep the state legislature from restricting their authority.

No, what happened was someone carrying out the law.  If the law's wrong, which in this case it probably is, working to change it is a good idea, which is what seems to be happening now.

You can't just ignore health codes.  Unless you think health codes for food donated to homeless shelters are a bad idea.

It isn't ignored.  The meat wasn't just shot, hung outside the door, and field dressed on the spot.  It came from processors, which appear to be licensed and inspected in LA.

http://www.ldaf.state.la.us/portal/Offices/AnimalHealthandFoodSafety /F ederalStateMeatPrograms/ApplyingforInspection/tabid/294/Default.aspx


But, unless I'm mistaken, the law says "no deer."  Should the law change?  Probably.
2013-02-27 10:57:54 AM
1 votes:

JustGetItRight: Hobo Jr.: It's the law. We couldn't donate leftovers from restaurants I have worked at unless officials picked it up themselves.

Raw foods have always been no go's at shelters.

It only takes one deer having a buck shot in its belly to lead to a lawsuit by some homeless class action group.

It sucks but a ten minute phone call would have saved time and probably would have given them an opportunity to donate it properly.

Bullshait.  Many states have donation programs for food banks and they work just fine.

What happened here was an overreach by a power tripping bureaucrat.  They're "now working with hunters in ways to donate extra game to homeless shelters" in a desperate attempt to keep the state legislature from restricting their authority.


No, what happened was someone carrying out the law.  If the law's wrong, which in this case it probably is, working to change it is a good idea, which is what seems to be happening now.

You can't just ignore health codes.  Unless you think health codes for food donated to homeless shelters are a bad idea.
2013-02-27 09:02:16 AM
1 votes:
crabsno termites:
How did the world survive before Upton Sinclair?

Through a series of short, sick lifetimes?
2013-02-27 08:50:34 AM
1 votes:
Chain of custody for meat. It's a thing.

On one hand, I can see how it's a major waste of good food. On the other, there's a legitimate reason for extreme risk aversion when it comes to food that can make people sick or possibly kill them... especially a "sensitive" population like the poor/homeless.


Yeah, there's a reason. Lawyers and lawsuits. Because if even one person gets sick, that's more important than feeding countless hungry people.
Not surprising that many here who could not imagine life without Big Brother directing every action of their life have no problem with this.
2013-02-27 08:22:08 AM
1 votes:

BronyMedic: TravelingFreakshow: Shame on you, Louisiana.

Follow Michigan's example: http://www.sportsmenagainsthunger.org/

According to your link, all the meat processing has to be done by a health department inspected and state licensed processing station

It's also highly regulated in Michigan.

Had the same thing been done in your own state, the same event would have occurred. How is it "Shame on them" again?


It is very easy to find a health department inspected and state licensed processing station even in cities like Flint.  I haven't done it and I know three off the top of my head and the price has been on average $70 per deer.  A lot of hunters do this without issue, and one charity holds a wild game dinner where you pay $40 a head for all you can eat game of every type.  I want in on that, but I can't afford the tickets and they always sell out real early.  Hunting and charity is very strong in MI.
2013-02-27 07:56:45 AM
1 votes:
This is because people don't want to get sued ALOT more than they want to help people..america is great like that.  You could give someone free food and if they get sick they cold sue you for massive amounts
2013-02-27 07:42:55 AM
1 votes:

Onkel Buck: I know right? I prefer my meat pumpled full of hormones and drugs and that it gets through the slaughterhouse ASAP even if the cow can't walk on its own.


Hint: One has nothing to do with the other.
2013-02-27 07:41:13 AM
1 votes:

log_jammin: Southern100: But the meat WAS processed and packaged by a licensed slaughterhouse.

how long was it laying in a field before it was gutted? how long before it was taken to the slaughter house?


I know right? I prefer my meat pumpled full of hormones and drugs and that it gets through the slaughterhouse ASAP even if the cow can't walk on its own.
i26.photobucket.com
2013-02-27 07:35:36 AM
1 votes:

Southern100: But the meat WAS processed and packaged by a licensed slaughterhouse.


how long was it laying in a field before it was gutted? how long before it was taken to the slaughter house?
2013-02-27 07:24:27 AM
1 votes:

Nina_Hartley's_Ass: "there is no way to verify how the deer were killed, prepared or stored."

Yeah but it's for the poor so who gives a fnck, right?


Done in one. Who cares if the  poor get some disease? Then we can have real fun and deny them healthcare!
2013-02-27 07:20:37 AM
1 votes:

Southern100: But the meat WAS processed and packaged by a licensed slaughterhouse.


Reading the article, it states that the slaughterhouse was not allowed, by state law, to process and sell or distribute the meat commercially. It was not licensed to do what it did, and did so in violation of state health law. In addition, the complaint was filed  by one of the people at the homeless shelter. Not by a meddling HD inspector.

So yes. It would have happened, regardless of any protections the hunters did.

In any event, the State's working with the charity to ensure that it can donate meat in the future.
2013-02-27 07:19:42 AM
1 votes:
FTA- "... deer are not an approved meat source to be distributed commercially,"

But they have no problem with you eating this?
i99.photobucket.com
2013-02-27 07:12:54 AM
1 votes:

BronyMedic: heinrich66: Nothing new here. State as enemy of the people.

How is protecting consumers who did not do the processing from meat which they cannot guarantee has been processed properly being "the enemy of the people"?

Oh, wait. I know this one! If they get sick, we should just tell them to be happy they got the scraps, right?


But the meat WAS processed and packaged by a licensed slaughterhouse.
2013-02-27 06:33:07 AM
1 votes:

heinrich66: Nothing new here. State as enemy of the people.


How is protecting consumers who did not do the processing from meat which they cannot guarantee has been processed properly being "the enemy of the people"?

Oh, wait. I know this one! If they get sick, we should just tell them to be happy they got the scraps, right?
2013-02-27 05:53:53 AM
1 votes:
Yet horse meat is routinely in your meat mix..........As it has been said ....some of it moos and some of it neighs......
2013-02-27 05:39:06 AM
1 votes:

2 Replies: Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Well, at least a shiatload of deer were killed for fun.

Eight deer, at most is far from a shiatload.


You DEFINITELY aren't getting 200 pounds of meat per deer. You're not even going to get half that.
2013-02-27 05:11:59 AM
1 votes:
There are lots of these programs here in Louisiana.  Hunters clean out all the old stuff from their freezers that they don't want, and "donate" it to a homeless shelter.  No way to know for sure, but I would bet good money some of that meat was "processed" in the back of Bubba's pickup truck a couple of years ago.  I wonder how many folks would be whining if someone got sick from eating this meat?

Oh, right, it's just homeless people.
2013-02-27 04:56:20 AM
1 votes:

crabsno termites: am referring to common sense food prep.


what point are you trying to make exactly? what about "common sense food prep"?
2013-02-27 03:52:46 AM
1 votes:

Friction8r: How sweet it will be when we have a crisis like a major earthquake that shuts down distribution to many major cities. Those in the woods will enjoy their venison, and the entitled snobs in the city will starve. No aragula for you.


Don't be daft. Mixed greens grow nicely in a clearing, not so much iceberg lettuce, the beloved leaf of the fast food industry.

Although last time I grew mixed greens in a wild setting I'm pretty sure some random weeds made it into the salad.
2013-02-27 03:37:31 AM
1 votes:
How sweet it will be when we have a crisis like a major earthquake that shuts down distribution to many major cities. Those in the woods will enjoy their venison, and the entitled snobs in the city will starve. No aragula for you.
2013-02-27 03:36:15 AM
1 votes:
"The department says it is now working with hunters in ways to donate extra game to homeless shelters. "

Ohh, the outrage.
2013-02-27 03:34:36 AM
1 votes:
reverse cop math?

$0.50 per pound on what farking planet?
2013-02-27 02:29:54 AM
1 votes:

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Well, at least a shiatload of deer were killed for fun.


1,600 lbs is like three deer.
2013-02-27 01:04:12 AM
1 votes:

RodneyToady: Shadow Blasko: Chain of custody for meat. It's a thing.

On one hand, I can see how it's a major waste of good food. On the other, there's a legitimate reason for extreme risk aversion when it comes to food that can make people sick or possibly kill them... especially a "sensitive" population like the poor/homeless.


I agree with it being necessary. I have a pretty good friend who likes to treat us to some pretty exotic meat from time to time, and he has a ServSafe certification (for what that is worth) because he used to be a sous chef at a pretty swanky place. He is super super careful about any meat that he uses, even just when cooking out for friends, and lectures (politely) many of us on stupid or unsafe things we do in our kitchens.

/First time I had ever seen a full kosher kitchen(s). Wow.. what a spread.
2013-02-27 12:08:09 AM
1 votes:
Sad tag lets Dumbass have a turn.
 
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