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(Fox News)   Three days until America finally accepts its future destiny as a dystopian hellscape   (foxnews.com ) divider line
    More: Cool, Boone Pickens, managements, Bob Woodward, David Kerley, crimes against nature, Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood, R. E. M  
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2378 clicks; posted to Politics » on 26 Feb 2013 at 6:26 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-26 08:11:58 PM  
The sequester is no big deal and it's all Obama's fault anyway.

/this is what infromed Fox News viewers actually believe
 
2013-02-26 08:12:16 PM  

WTFDYW: We will move on without missing hardly a beat. As a country, we need a "hair cut". We've been spending like there's no tomorrow at least since I graduated high school in 1981.


Using a chainsaw to lop off the top of the skulls of everyone on Social Security isn't a "haircut".
 
2013-02-26 08:22:22 PM  

Dusk-You-n-Me: Tannax: We absolutely have a spending problem.

Right now we're not spending enough.


Troll or simpleton?  Please be troll.  I get tempted to debate simpletons.
 
2013-02-26 08:25:27 PM  

Ambivalence: Rev. Skarekroe: My guess is that at about 11:59 pm Thursday night they'll find a way to kick the can down the road 6 months or so and we'll go through all this nonsense again in the summer.

That's not unlikely.


I agree. Its improbable that the stated scenario will definitely not occur.
 
2013-02-26 08:29:28 PM  
If Mitt Romney was President, the sequester would have never happened.
 
2013-02-26 08:30:59 PM  
1933:  "The only thing we have to fear is fear itself."

2013:  "FEAR!  FEAR!  FEAR!!!"
 
2013-02-26 08:31:24 PM  

cchris_39: Troll or simpleton?  Please be troll.  I get tempted to debate simpletons.


This was worth your time to post.
 
2013-02-26 08:35:34 PM  

cchris_39: Dusk-You-n-Me: Tannax: We absolutely have a spending problem.

Right now we're not spending enough.

Troll or simpleton?  Please be troll.  I get tempted to debate simpletons.


Yeah, you're right and (nearly) every economist is wrong.
 
2013-02-26 08:44:59 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-02-26 08:47:54 PM  

Tannax: Seriously, how farking hard can a 1.2% cut to the budget hurt? It's a goddamn rounding error compared to the money we are spending out of our children's piggy bank.


Seriously, are you this stupid?

I'm going to make it really, really simple for your dumb ass. Let's say my household budget is $100K a year. I decide to cut $2,300.  That's 2.3%   How hard could it be?

But I'm not going to cut it from rent, utilities, gas, entertainment, clothing.  I'm only going to cut it from my grocery budget, which is $10K a year.

Gee, how could that little 2.3% be difficult?

See, we're cutting $85 billion from a portion of the budget that is about $2 trillion.  AND half the fiscal year has already gone by.

Is this so hard to grasp?  Medicare - off the table.  Social security - off the table. Military salaries off the table. Contractual obligations like leases. Etc.

Farkity fark fark fark some people insist on being stupid.
 
2013-02-26 08:50:31 PM  

Funk Brothers: If Mitt Romney was President, the sequester would have never happened.


Yes we all get that that's the point the GOP is trying to get across. We're being punished for being uppity and voting for the black kid with the single mom.
 
2013-02-26 09:01:58 PM  

jasimo: cchris_39: Dusk-You-n-Me: Tannax: We absolutely have a spending problem.

Right now we're not spending enough.

Troll or simpleton?  Please be troll.  I get tempted to debate simpletons.

Yeah, you're right and (nearly) every economist is wrong.


He probably thinks that giving tax breaks to rich people creates jobs.
 
2013-02-26 09:05:09 PM  

MisterRonbo: Tannax: Seriously, how farking hard can a 1.2% cut to the budget hurt? It's a goddamn rounding error compared to the money we are spending out of our children's piggy bank.

Seriously, are you this stupid?

I'm going to make it really, really simple for your dumb ass. Let's say my household budget is $100K a year. I decide to cut $2,300.  That's 2.3%   How hard could it be?

But I'm not going to cut it from rent, utilities, gas, entertainment, clothing.  I'm only going to cut it from my grocery budget, which is $10K a year.

Gee, how could that little 2.3% be difficult?

See, we're cutting $85 billion from a portion of the budget that is about $2 trillion.  AND half the fiscal year has already gone by.

Is this so hard to grasp?  Medicare - off the table.  Social security - off the table. Military salaries off the table. Contractual obligations like leases. Etc.

Farkity fark fark fark some people insist on being stupid.


----

Not only that, but we're not actually cutting anything.  The government is required to do everything it does by law.  Congress says "you will do this and you get this much money to do it."  The sequester isn't shutting down any programs.  Doing that takes time and planning.  We're not canceling contracts immediately.  We're not consolidating offices.  Agencies can't just unilaterally decide to cut the fat.  That fat is usually specifically earmarked into bills.

So, the only real option to cut costs is to have everyone stop coming in one day a week, but to otherwise keep doing the exact same thing.  Just, you know, with a 20% pay cut that surely wont hurt the economy much or cause any sort of retention issues.

To use a stupid household analogy, this is like deciding that you're not making enough money to cover your expenses and deciding to deal with it by not eating on Tuesdays and by flipping your circuit breaker for the house off on Saturdays.
 
2013-02-26 09:10:04 PM  
I don't care whose fault it is (well, okay, maybe a little but I just assume that most of the politicians are ineffective in one way or another), or what could have been done to prevent this shiatshow.

Will someone please explain, in unbiased terms, what will happen come Saturday if a resolution is not met? No sarcasm about dystopia or BS about nothing changing. Which entitlements disappear and how will it affect the average American worker/student/business owner/family/erotic dancer, etc.?

I assume the country wont collapse, but just how bad will it be? What will these impacts look like?

Please, someone just cut to the chase without all of the politicking for once.
 
2013-02-26 09:10:27 PM  
Tannax

Don't talk down to me as if you think you are smart

You could help by not saying such stupid things.

only 3 months of the year will have passed

Like this, for example. The fiscal year starts October 1st. Five months. Can you count that high?

it is 44 billion out of 3600-ish billion.

or this, for example. It's $85 billion, and it is not out of the whole 3.5 trillion. 60% of the budget is off the table, and 40% of the year has already passed. That leaves less than a third of the budget. This has been explained to you, but you're, well, stupid.

Oh, and by the way, those tax increases will have to hit every single person. There isn't enough rich people in the US for us to suck dry to save us.

More stupid. Here's how stupid happens: start with an actual fact: if we taxed EARNED income of the wealthy at 100% it wouldn't cover the debt. Now simplify it in to "if we taxed rich people 100%" and you're in the land of stupid.

Capital gains (unearned income) is $2 trillion. Over 90% of it flows to the top 2% of earners. You damn well could solve the deficit problem taxing that at even 50%.

You could also start taxing wealth as opposed to income. Sheldon Adelson has $8 billion or so? Take 2% a year.

You could also put in a corporate minimum tax. The portion of the tax burden carried by corporations has declined by more than half in the last 50 years.

Hint: the top 2% have 80% of the wealth. The richest 400 people in America have more wealth than the poorest 50% of the country. The Wal Mart heirs and Warren Buffet and Bill Gates and Sheldon Adelson and GE - that's where you get the money from.

But you'll keep spouting the same utter bullshiat, because no doubt you've read these facts before and reject them.
 
2013-02-26 09:15:19 PM  

Tannax: Seriously, how farking hard can a 1.2% cut to the budget hurt? It's a goddamn rounding error compared to the money we are spending out of our children's piggy bank.


As one of those children, I read this as "Waaah, we don't want to pay back those loans we've been taking out for the past thirty years against our children's credit by raising taxes."
 
2013-02-26 09:20:17 PM  

Springy23: Will someone please explain, in unbiased terms, what will happen come Saturday if a resolution is not met? No sarcasm about dystopia or BS about nothing changing. Which entitlements disappear and how will it affect the average American worker/student/business owner/family/erotic dancer, etc.?


Read this

Of course, it's not like it all happens at once on the first day, but the longer it goes on, the worse it will get.
 
2013-02-26 09:27:25 PM  

Springy23: I assume the country wont collapse, but just how bad will it be? What will these impacts look like?

Please, someone just cut to the chase without all of the politicking for once.


Also,

Link
 
2013-02-26 09:28:20 PM  
I though the GOP was for budget cuts, why are that getting all freaked out about this sequester, seems like they are getting what they wanted.
 
2013-02-26 09:37:32 PM  
Y2K!11
 
2013-02-26 09:42:32 PM  

clowncar on fire: Y2K!11


So the government should just max out all their credit cards. When the computers go down, they don't have to pay them off.
 
2013-02-26 09:47:14 PM  
Sales tax on shares of stock.

How many shares changed hands today?
 
2013-02-26 09:50:37 PM  

Springy23: Will someone please explain, in unbiased terms, what will happen come Saturday if a resolution is not met? No sarcasm about dystopia or BS about nothing changing. Which entitlements disappear and how will it affect the average American worker/student/business owner/family/erotic dancer, etc.?


Part of the difficulty of this is that *everything* is getting cut.

Take a look at this.
http://g-ecx.images-amazon.com/images/G/01/books/apub/deathtaxes/D_T _A _Plus_1_LARGE.jpg

All of those things are getting cut.  People are listing things like grants, subsidies to kids, subsidies to states, ect because those are easy to quantize - this many people usually get money, now only this many will.  But that's not really the whole effect.

Who knows what effect it'll have on the administration of aging.  I don't even know what they do but I suppose they'll be doing less of it now.  There might not be any noticable effect on you personally.

However, the overall effect is that a whole bunch of people will be either out of a job or will have their incomes drastically cut fairly suddenly.  It'll suck for the people involved and in the aggregate it'll drag on the economy and slow our recovery, slow our job growth, and possibly push us back into recession.
 
2013-02-26 10:05:26 PM  

Lionel Mandrake: Springy23: Will someone please explain, in unbiased terms, what will happen come Saturday if a resolution is not met? No sarcasm about dystopia or BS about nothing changing. Which entitlements disappear and how will it affect the average American worker/student/business owner/family/erotic dancer, etc.?

Read this

Of course, it's not like it all happens at once on the first day, but the longer it goes on, the worse it will get.


You are presuming that they don't alter the wasteful spending habits that necessitated the sequestration in the first place. Most economies, when faced with a reduction of funds, tend to reign in on the practices which tend to waste assets in an effort to meet the new budgets and provide consistant services.  Reducing redundancy, inefficiency, surplus purchasing, waste, are some of the more obvious ways of meeting a budget without effecting service.  Others introduce recycling (recovering funds), conservation of resources, best practices, etc.

I took a look at the estimate of damage for Kentucky.  They like to shock you by saying "3000 kids will go without" which may be true but only if they continue doing business in the future the same inefficient way as they are currently handling it.  Using a few tweeks to how business is run, they could easily be saying " only 1000 kids will be effected by cuts in service".  One of the advantages of sequestration would be that services would be forced to reevaluate how they do business in order to succeed.  Don't be put off by the size of the cuts- take the time to see exactly what percentage of the overall budget they are currently working under.  In many cases, the sacrifice won't be as great as they make it out to be.

I'm not naive in believing that their won't be some pain initially as government is a notoriously costly and poorly run business, but with time, services should be able to adapt to the budget cuts and be able to continue providing pretty much the same level of service to their customer in the future they are currently providing today.
 
2013-02-26 10:13:08 PM  

bluorangefyre: Circusdog320: the article failed to mention conservatives going off full tilt about a couple of parked aircraft carriers...My nutty republican "friend" said we should prepare for massive attack!


WOLVERINES!

And THAT is along the same lines of what I got from a John McCain soundbite, as though the Republicans were crying about spending cuts, the very thing they've wanted.  It made my head hurt!


I used to think the conservatives didn't believe in Keynesian economics.
 
2013-02-26 10:21:19 PM  

NeoCortex42: clowncar on fire: Y2K!11

So the government should just max out all their credit cards. When the computers go down, they don't have to pay them off.

How quickly we forget.  Remember all the nay-sayers predicting the collapse of the economy as all the computers of the world collapsed after partying like it was 1999?  Companies wasted millions in y2k pre-testing computer systems and updating software in an effort to prevent that crash.  People pulled cash from the banks and sold off stock and come December 31st at midnight, we all stayed in our homes with one eye on the computer, waiting for any sign of that predicted crash.

By quarter past there was this huge collective groan as we realized that, not only had the crash of polite socite occurred, but that we had been ripped off millions protecting ourselves against the fears of the nay-sayers.

Now we face sequestration.  Again we only have the cries of the nay-sayers ringing in our ears as they take up cadence whispering a line from their most favorite but feared childhood fable, "the sky is falling, the sky is falling...".
 
2013-02-26 10:35:03 PM  

clowncar on fire: NeoCortex42: clowncar on fire: Y2K!11

So the government should just max out all their credit cards. When the computers go down, they don't have to pay them off.
How quickly we forget.  Remember all the nay-sayers predicting the collapse of the economy as all the computers of the world collapsed after partying like it was 1999?  Companies wasted millions in y2k pre-testing computer systems and updating software in an effort to prevent that crash.  People pulled cash from the banks and sold off stock and come December 31st at midnight, we all stayed in our homes with one eye on the computer, waiting for any sign of that predicted crash.

By quarter past there was this huge collective groan as we realized that, not only had the crash of polite socite occurred, but that we had been ripped off millions protecting ourselves against the fears of the nay-sayers.

Now we face sequestration.  Again we only have the cries of the nay-sayers ringing in our ears as they take up cadence whispering a line from their most favorite but feared childhood fable, "the sky is falling, the sky is falling...".


Umm, companies didn't waste millions.  Companies spent millions making sure their software was up to date and wouldn't crash.  Had they not done that all those things that were predicted would have happened.

There was a very specific issue - software that only used 2 digit years (quite a lot) would roll over and think it was 1900.  Companies had to either update their software to use 4 digit years, update their software to continue using 2 digit years but assume some range other than 1900-2000 (1970-2070 or whatever), or to ensure that there were no comparisons or subtractions that would cause problems.  e.g., your company's payroll software calculates ((clockout - clockin)*your hourly rate) - but since you clocked out in 1900 you just worked negative 100 years, you now are automatically billed $5M instead of paid for your 2 hours of work over the new year.
 
2013-02-26 10:57:03 PM  

Springy23: I don't care whose fault it is (well, okay, maybe a little but I just assume that most of the politicians are ineffective in one way or another), or what could have been done to prevent this shiatshow.

Will someone please explain, in unbiased terms, what will happen come Saturday if a resolution is not met? No sarcasm about dystopia or BS about nothing changing. Which entitlements disappear and how will it affect the average American worker/student/business owner/family/erotic dancer, etc.?

I assume the country wont collapse, but just how bad will it be? What will these impacts look like?

Please, someone just cut to the chase without all of the politicking for once.


The White House already did that for us. Enjoy!!!
 
2013-02-26 11:19:48 PM  

clowncar on fire: NeoCortex42: clowncar on fire: Y2K!11

So the government should just max out all their credit cards. When the computers go down, they don't have to pay them off.
How quickly we forget.  Remember all the nay-sayers predicting the collapse of the economy as all the computers of the world collapsed after partying like it was 1999?  Companies wasted millions in y2k pre-testing computer systems and updating software in an effort to prevent that crash.  People pulled cash from the banks and sold off stock and come December 31st at midnight, we all stayed in our homes with one eye on the computer, waiting for any sign of that predicted crash.

By quarter past there was this huge collective groan as we realized that, not only had the crash of polite socite occurred, but that we had been ripped off millions protecting ourselves against the fears of the nay-sayers.

Now we face sequestration.  Again we only have the cries of the nay-sayers ringing in our ears as they take up cadence whispering a line from their most favorite but feared childhood fable, "the sky is falling, the sky is falling...".


Wow, what a terrible analogy! Something happened a while ago that didn't turn out to be as bad as predicted, so this new thing, which is completely different in every way, will also not turn out as bad as predicted.
 
2013-02-27 12:39:52 AM  
When government is framed as a business with customers it's only a matter of time before it becomes a kleptocracy.

We're f*cking citizens, I wish we'd stop with this bullshiat that we're nothing but consumers whose purpose is to either make someone money or cost someone money.
 
2013-02-27 01:12:08 AM  
The republicans would rather drive us into a recession than raise taxes on the wealthy a few percentage points. And when that self-inflicted recession inevitably happens, they will easily convince their retarded, knuckle-dragging, newly-unemployed supporters that the "liberalist president evarrrrr" WANTED massive budget cuts. And they will continue to get away with it until the either South secedes, or their misinformed, sellout boomer supporters f*cking die.
 
2013-02-27 01:14:15 AM  

Karac: Dystopian hellscape?
I call dibs on the fertile, attractive women.


I'll take the infertile ones. I'm finished with diapers.
 
HBK
2013-02-27 02:18:06 AM  

Lionel Mandrake: Springy23: Will someone please explain, in unbiased terms, what will happen come Saturday if a resolution is not met? No sarcasm about dystopia or BS about nothing changing. Which entitlements disappear and how will it affect the average American worker/student/business owner/family/erotic dancer, etc.?

Read this

Of course, it's not like it all happens at once on the first day, but the longer it goes on, the worse it will get.


If anything good can be said about the sequester, it's this: at least the TSA will get less money.
 
2013-02-27 05:35:38 AM  

seanpg71: clowncar on fire: NeoCortex42: clowncar on fire: Y2K!11

So the government should just max out all their credit cards. When the computers go down, they don't have to pay them off.
How quickly we forget.  Remember all the nay-sayers predicting the collapse of the economy as all the computers of the world collapsed after partying like it was 1999?  Companies wasted millions in y2k pre-testing computer systems and updating software in an effort to prevent that crash.  People pulled cash from the banks and sold off stock and come December 31st at midnight, we all stayed in our homes with one eye on the computer, waiting for any sign of that predicted crash.

By quarter past there was this huge collective groan as we realized that, not only had the crash of polite socite occurred, but that we had been ripped off millions protecting ourselves against the fears of the nay-sayers.

Now we face sequestration.  Again we only have the cries of the nay-sayers ringing in our ears as they take up cadence whispering a line from their most favorite but feared childhood fable, "the sky is falling, the sky is falling...".

Umm, companies didn't waste millions.  Companies spent millions making sure their software was up to date and wouldn't crash.  Had they not done that all those things that were predicted would have happened.

There was a very specific issue - software that only used 2 digit years (quite a lot) would roll over and think it was 1900.  Companies had to either update their software to use 4 digit years, update their software to continue using 2 digit years but assume some range other than 1900-2000 (1970-2070 or whatever), or to ensure that there were no comparisons or subtractions that would cause problems.  e.g., your company's payroll software calculates ((clockout - clockin)*your hourly rate) - but since you clocked out in 1900 you just worked negative 100 years, you now are automatically billed $5M instead of paid for your 2 hours of work over the new year.


The y2k bug also lined a lot of programmer pockets. I wouldn't be surprised if the amount spent to fix the two digit issue had an impact on the size of the (then impending) dot com boom
 
2013-02-27 06:52:04 AM  

seanpg71: clowncar on fire: NeoCortex42: clowncar on fire: Y2K!11

So the government should just max out all their credit cards. When the computers go down, they don't have to pay them off.
How quickly we forget.  Remember all the nay-sayers predicting the collapse of the economy as all the computers of the world collapsed after partying like it was 1999?  Companies wasted millions in y2k pre-testing computer systems and updating software in an effort to prevent that crash.  People pulled cash from the banks and sold off stock and come December 31st at midnight, we all stayed in our homes with one eye on the computer, waiting for any sign of that predicted crash.

By quarter past there was this huge collective groan as we realized that, not only had the crash of polite socite occurred, but that we had been ripped off millions protecting ourselves against the fears of the nay-sayers.

Now we face sequestration.  Again we only have the cries of the nay-sayers ringing in our ears as they take up cadence whispering a line from their most favorite but feared childhood fable, "the sky is falling, the sky is falling...".

Umm, companies didn't waste millions.  Companies spent millions making sure their software was up to date and wouldn't crash.  Had they not done that all those things that were predicted would have happened.

There was a very specific issue - software that only used 2 digit years (quite a lot) would roll over and think it was 1900.  Companies had to either update their software to use 4 digit years, update their software to continue using 2 digit years but assume some range other than 1900-2000 (1970-2070 or whatever), or to ensure that there were no comparisons or subtractions that would cause problems.  e.g., your company's payroll software calculates ((clockout - clockin)*your hourly rate) - but since you clocked out in 1900 you just worked negative 100 years, you now are automatically billed $5M instead of paid for your 2 hours of work over the new year.


This. I personally wrote code in the 1980s that was still running in embedded control systems in exhibition centers, hospitals, and offices in 2000 and that would have failed in bizarre ways unless somebody fixed it. (Among other things, it calculated how long certain systems had been running without being recycled or restarted -- and for a week in 2000 it would have decided that the answer was "99 years give or take" and systems would have been constantly recycling).

On top of that, I was product manager of a very popular 4GL/GUI tool in the run up to Y2K. One of the features of the product was automatic date windowing. If we hadn't fixed our runtime (to change the assumed 2 digit window), literally tens of thousands of applications built on our product would have had bizarre and unpredictable behavior. We diverted a lot of development and even more testing resources to fixing those problems and ensuring they didn't create regressions (and on the plus side of the ledger, saved all the users of our product from having to fix their applications individually).

So really, those of you that get your "knowledge" of Y2K from Time magazine and Big Bang Theory need to STFU. Maybe it's not as glamorous as Bruce Willis blowing up an asteroid, but those of us that were actually there know that a huge problem was averted because a lot of people put in a lot of hours making sure it didn't happen. You're welcome.
 
2013-02-27 06:55:46 AM  

thisone: The y2k bug also lined a lot of programmer pockets. I wouldn't be surprised if the amount spent to fix the two digit issue had an impact on the size of the (then impending) dot com boom


If by "impact" you mean "dragged down the amount of useful work being done because people were busy remediating old problems just to maintain parity", then I suppose yes, it's possible it did drag down the size of the dot com boom.

But thinking that Y2K spending actually inflated spending in any useful way is a perfect example of the Broken Windows Fallacy.
 
2013-02-27 07:13:18 AM  

czetie: thisone: The y2k bug also lined a lot of programmer pockets. I wouldn't be surprised if the amount spent to fix the two digit issue had an impact on the size of the (then impending) dot com boom

If by "impact" you mean "dragged down the amount of useful work being done because people were busy remediating old problems just to maintain parity", then I suppose yes, it's possible it did drag down the size of the dot com boom.

But thinking that Y2K spending actually inflated spending in any useful way is a perfect example of the Broken Windows Fallacy.


Neither in fact.

Perfect example of reading what you want to see.
 
2013-02-27 08:06:32 AM  

Super Chronic: I'm going to go against what seems to be the consensus here and predict that the sequester will, in fact, kick in.  There will be cuts and there will be layoffs.  Now, I don't think they will leave it at that forever; I think they'll probably get something done in maybe a couple of weeks or months.  But my expectation is that Friday will arrive and there will not be a deal.


I'm hoping that's what will happen. It might actually get people's attention focused on what the GOP has brought about. No one ever pays attention to the weatherman until the tornado hits.
 
2013-02-27 08:48:01 AM  
Dystopian Hellscape?You mean like Detroit?
 
2013-02-27 09:11:13 AM  

thisone: czetie: thisone: The y2k bug also lined a lot of programmer pockets. I wouldn't be surprised if the amount spent to fix the two digit issue had an impact on the size of the (then impending) dot com boom

If by "impact" you mean "dragged down the amount of useful work being done because people were busy remediating old problems just to maintain parity", then I suppose yes, it's possible it did drag down the size of the dot com boom.

But thinking that Y2K spending actually inflated spending in any useful way is a perfect example of the Broken Windows Fallacy.

Neither in fact.

Perfect example of reading what you want to see.


OK, you could mean one of two things "by impact on the size of the ... dot com boom":

1) It decreased the size of the dot com boom, perhaps by diverting money and programmers to remediation of old problems instead of creating new code. If that's what you mean, congratulations. You might well have a point.

2) It increased the size of the dot com boom, perhaps by pumping more money into tech work. If that's what you mean, congratulations. You have committed the Broken Windows Fallacy.

If it's neither of those, then I have no idea what your assertion is, and all I can say is... proceed, guv'nor.
 
2013-02-27 05:28:48 PM  

czetie: seanpg71: clowncar on fire: NeoCortex42: clowncar on fire: Y2K!11

So the government should just max out all their credit cards. When the computers go down, they don't have to pay them off.
How quickly we forget.  Remember all the nay-sayers predicting the collapse of the economy as all the computers of the world collapsed after partying like it was 1999?  Companies wasted millions in y2k pre-testing computer systems and updating software in an effort to prevent that crash.  People pulled cash from the banks and sold off stock and come December 31st at midnight, we all stayed in our homes with one eye on the computer, waiting for any sign of that predicted crash.

By quarter past there was this huge collective groan as we realized that, not only had the crash of polite socite occurred, but that we had been ripped off millions protecting ourselves against the fears of the nay-sayers.

Now we face sequestration.  Again we only have the cries of the nay-sayers ringing in our ears as they take up cadence whispering a line from their most favorite but feared childhood fable, "the sky is falling, the sky is falling...".

Umm, companies didn't waste millions.  Companies spent millions making sure their software was up to date and wouldn't crash.  Had they not done that all those things that were predicted would have happened.

There was a very specific issue - software that only used 2 digit years (quite a lot) would roll over and think it was 1900.  Companies had to either update their software to use 4 digit years, update their software to continue using 2 digit years but assume some range other than 1900-2000 (1970-2070 or whatever), or to ensure that there were no comparisons or subtractions that would cause problems.  e.g., your company's payroll software calculates ((clockout - clockin)*your hourly rate) - but since you clocked out in 1900 you just worked negative 100 years, you now are automatically billed $5M instead of paid for your 2 hours of work over the new year.

This. I personally wrote code in the 1980s that was still running in embedded control systems in exhibition centers, hospitals, and offices in 2000 and that would have failed in bizarre ways unless somebody fixed it. (Among other things, it calculated how long certain systems had been running without being recycled or restarted -- and for a week in 2000 it would have decided that the answer was "99 years give or take" and systems would have been constantly recycling).

On top of that, I was product manager of a very popular 4GL/GUI tool in the run up to Y2K. One of the features of the product was automatic date windowing. If we hadn't fixed our runtime (to change the assumed 2 digit window), literally tens of thousands of applications built on our product would have had bizarre and unpredictable behavior. We diverted a lot of development and even more testing resources to fixing those problems and ensuring they didn't create regressions (and on the plus side of the ledger, saved all the users of our product from having to fix their applications individually).

So really, those of you that get your "knowledge" of Y2K from Time magazine and Big Bang Theory need to STFU. Maybe it's not as glamorous as Bruce Willis blowing up an asteroid, but those of us that were actually there know that a huge problem was averted because a lot of people put in a lot of hours making sure it didn't happen. You're welcome.


Thank you.
 
2013-02-27 05:41:18 PM  

nmemkha: Dystopian Hellscape?You mean like Detroit?


Fascinating things happening in detroit after the economic collapse: http://www.changinggears.info/2011/11/09/empty-places-its-not-squattin g-its-blotting/

http://detroitagriculture.net/

Urban farms popping up all over, abandoned blocks becoming eco-villages, just really interesting stuff...
 
2013-03-01 02:55:15 AM  
National map from Buzzpheed indicating states facing the worst cuts

/did not wish to gank Buzzy's bandwidth
//map is almost funny
 
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