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(Independent)   The premise of the second single from David Bowie's new album is that David Bowie wants David Bowie off his lawn. Then it gets weird   (independent.co.uk) divider line 30
    More: Cool, Tilda Swinton, second single, lawns  
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1370 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 26 Feb 2013 at 9:43 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-26 09:52:01 AM  
For anyone who cares, the video is NSFW.
 
2013-02-26 10:04:23 AM  
Well, that was farking bizarre.

And yes, in the last two minutes it begins to resemble a montage of the weirder sex scenes in 'The Man Who Fell To Earth.'  Being that you can see Newton on the magazine cover at the beginning of the video, that looks deliberate.

Glad he's back.
 
2013-02-26 10:17:18 AM  
I liked it.  Going to check out the new album.
 
2013-02-26 10:18:05 AM  

KhamanV: Well, that was farking bizarre.

And yes, in the last two minutes it begins to resemble a montage of the weirder sex scenes in 'The Man Who Fell To Earth.'  Being that you can see Newton on the magazine cover at the beginning of the video, that looks deliberate.

Glad he's back.


...so what you're saying is, Bowie's back?
 
2013-02-26 10:31:55 AM  
I'm surprised that as the rock stars from the 60s and 70s have gotten older and older that there haven't been more songs about how they're trying to get on with normal lives while being haunted by the allure of their past rock star lifestyle.
 
2013-02-26 10:56:37 AM  
GHOST HIPSTERS.
 
2013-02-26 11:07:47 AM  

KhamanV: Well, that was farking bizarre.

And yes, in the last two minutes it begins to resemble a montage of the weirder sex scenes in 'The Man Who Fell To Earth.'  Being that you can see Newton on the magazine cover at the beginning of the video, that looks deliberate.

Glad he's back.


Watched it once and had weird Bowie dreams all night.

/seriously stoked for the album
 
2013-02-26 11:14:03 AM  

KhamanV: Well, that was farking bizarre.

And yes, in the last two minutes it begins to resemble a montage of the weirder sex scenes in 'The Man Who Fell To Earth.'  Being that you can see Newton on the magazine cover at the beginning of the video, that looks deliberate.

Glad he's back.


Wow, that was cool... I like it.

Also like the inside joke of having a woman basically play Bowie...
 
2013-02-26 11:16:47 AM  
Weird Bowie is Best Bowie
 
2013-02-26 11:37:24 AM  

Mikey1969: KhamanV: Well, that was farking bizarre.

And yes, in the last two minutes it begins to resemble a montage of the weirder sex scenes in 'The Man Who Fell To Earth.'  Being that you can see Newton on the magazine cover at the beginning of the video, that looks deliberate.

Glad he's back.

Wow, that was cool... I like it.

Also like the inside joke of having a woman basically play Bowie...


Plus the joke of Tilda Swinton playing his wife - another person who could handily play a younger Bowie.
 
2013-02-26 11:37:26 AM  
I thought Bowie was gone forever.  Now he's back.  This is good.  Especially since this album sounds a LOT better than Reality.

Reality bites.
 
2013-02-26 11:41:51 AM  
Pretty good. As expected.
 
2013-02-26 11:53:52 AM  
1) I'd forgotten what a charismatic screen presence Bowie has.  The song is kind of meh (maybe it will grow on me), but when I watch Bowie in action I just want to like him...
2) I need me some turquoise eyeliner
 
2013-02-26 11:55:33 AM  
He should have retired from music after Scary Monsters and from acting after The Hunger.
 
2013-02-26 12:24:31 PM  

The One True TheDavid: He should have retired from music after Scary Monsters and from acting after The Hunger.


I liked him as Pontius Pilate in "The Last Temptation of Christ."  And as Nikolai Tesla in "The Prestige."
 
2013-02-26 12:40:17 PM  
If Tilda Swinton doesn't play Bowie on the big screen there is no justice. In this vid, her curly haired incarnation looks just like Angie Bowie circa 1971 and at the end she looks just like "Low"-era David.
 
2013-02-26 12:54:34 PM  
Ashes to ashes flunk to flunkie
 
2013-02-26 01:12:58 PM  
So you can see the Thin White Duke in the video?
 
2013-02-26 05:36:02 PM  

Nabb1: The One True TheDavid: He should have retired from music after Scary Monsters and from acting after The Hunger.

I liked him as Pontius Pilate in "The Last Temptation of Christ."  And as Nikolai Tesla in "The Prestige."


He was a terrific Andy Warhol in Basquiat
 
2013-02-26 05:56:19 PM  
What no Flying Conchords references yet?

Oh and yes someones space nipples are hard...
 
2013-02-26 06:51:58 PM  
I'm fairly sure Dave could figure out a way to throw himself off his own lawn.
 
2013-02-26 07:28:13 PM  

Nabb1: The One True TheDavid: He should have retired from music after Scary Monsters and from acting after The Hunger.

I liked him as Pontius Pilate in "The Last Temptation of Christ."  And as Nikolai Tesla in "The Prestige."


I liked his Pilate a lot.  He played it as a guy just having to deal with this minor interruption in his day and then he would go get lunch.
 
2013-02-26 09:34:45 PM  
Can someone give me the key to understanding what makes Bowie such a spiritual experience for his fans? I respect him, and quite like a small handful of his new and old songs, but most of his music is absolute meh to me. It would be a pity if Bowie was just one of those things that either does or doesn't click. I blank out trying to get into him. I haven't the slightest idea of what inspires him to put words to music. I'm a fan of a lot of other obscure and bizarre artists. I totally get that there is special meaning in his inflection and stage performances, but while it doesn't feel insincere, it does feel both random and mundane. And I don't think my life without drugs explains it, since a lot of music I do like is big with the junkies. Bowie's whole scene, and his fans, all vibe to me like something made-up for an old movie. Like an androgynous Spinal Tap.
 
2013-02-26 09:44:20 PM  
I should also mention, he always seems to play the same character when he's acting in movies. Someone who isn't comfortable in his own skin, conspicuously quiet and closed, always looking too closely at you, as if worried that you've guessed he's secretly gay...
 
2013-02-27 06:48:06 AM  

LrdPhoenix: I'm surprised that as the rock stars from the 60s and 70s have gotten older and older that there haven't been more songs about how they're trying to get on with normal lives while being haunted by the allure of their past rock star lifestyle.


upload.wikimedia.org
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-02-28 02:09:08 PM  

LrdPhoenix: I'm surprised that as the rock stars from the 60s and 70s have gotten older and older that there haven't been more songs about how they're trying to get on with normal lives while being haunted by the allure of their past rock star lifestyle.


Yeah, that's a really interesting vid on a number of levels. I particularly liked the whole famous me watching unfamous me watching famous me thing and the body-snatching/vampire imagery.  The vid works very well with the lyrics too, which is pretty rare to see these days.
 
2013-02-28 02:23:37 PM  

Austinoftx: Can someone give me the key to understanding what makes Bowie such a spiritual experience for his fans? I respect him, and quite like a small handful of his new and old songs, but most of his music is absolute meh to me. It would be a pity if Bowie was just one of those things that either does or doesn't click. I blank out trying to get into him. I haven't the slightest idea of what inspires him to put words to music. I'm a fan of a lot of other obscure and bizarre artists. I totally get that there is special meaning in his inflection and stage performances, but while it doesn't feel insincere, it does feel both random and mundane. And I don't think my life without drugs explains it, since a lot of music I do like is big with the junkies. Bowie's whole scene, and his fans, all vibe to me like something made-up for an old movie. Like an androgynous Spinal Tap.


Different people get different stuff from him. Most folks who like him that I've known have been drawn to the androgyny and the positive portrayal of bi/pansexuality. A lot of Bowie's work is about exploring gender and breaking it down, blurring the lines between masculinity and femininity. There's also a real dissatisfaction with conventional male-dominated monogamy there which fans appreciate. As such, people who don't feel they fall into conventional gender stereotypes, or who rebel against those roles, or who just find androgyny more compelling aesthetically tend to like his work, and even more so if they're older fans who starting following Bowie back in the day when those sorts of identities weren't so accepted.

Alienation is another big theme in his music and stage-act. The idea of being an alien, or someone out of their proper time, or the undead, or just someone who clearly does not fit in the society they're living in features in a lot of his stuff, so people who share that feeling of being a square peg in the land of round holes are drawn to him for that. Then there's just pure aesthetics; Bowie helped make glam-rock, he kept it growing, and he got out of it before it got lame and stale in the mid 80s transition to hair bands (twisted sister, ect). Some people just like that look, and the sound, and his lyrics.
 
2013-02-28 04:32:16 PM  
Heron: Alienation is another big theme in his music and stage-act. The idea of being an alien, or someone out of their proper time, or the undead, or just someone who clearly does not fit in the society they're living in features in a lot of his stuff, so people who share that feeling of being a square peg in the land of round holes are drawn to him for that. Then there's just pure aesthetics; Bowie helped make glam-rock, he kept it growing, and he got out of it before it got lame and stale in the mid 80s transition to hair bands (twisted sister, ect). Some people just like that look, and the sound, and his lyrics.

Hey, thanks for replying; It's not that I have trouble getting my head around the androgyny and alien POV. Those things are pretty up-front there. They just don't bring me any flashes of insight. And it's hard to believe that Bowie's brand of alienation and longing is so unique that teenage me didn't feel some familiar chords. Sadly, all I seem to get out of Bowie is a few catchy, sweetly sad tunes that got radio play. It wouldn't bug me so much if Bowie was a mostly forgotten weirdo with an exclusive following like Jobriath, but Bowie still has millions and millions of devoted fans. I feel like a dog watching television, you know? Getting nothing out of the images and sounds but suspicious that there's a whole lot of something there I'm just not getting. I feel like the alien. Is that it? Is that what the magnificent bastard is trying to provoke? LOL.
 
2013-02-28 07:26:31 PM  

Austinoftx: Heron: Alienation is another big theme in his music and stage-act. The idea of being an alien, or someone out of their proper time, or the undead, or just someone who clearly does not fit in the society they're living in features in a lot of his stuff, so people who share that feeling of being a square peg in the land of round holes are drawn to him for that. Then there's just pure aesthetics; Bowie helped make glam-rock, he kept it growing, and he got out of it before it got lame and stale in the mid 80s transition to hair bands (twisted sister, ect). Some people just like that look, and the sound, and his lyrics.

Hey, thanks for replying; It's not that I have trouble getting my head around the androgyny and alien POV. Those things are pretty up-front there. They just don't bring me any flashes of insight. And it's hard to believe that Bowie's brand of alienation and longing is so unique that teenage me didn't feel some familiar chords. Sadly, all I seem to get out of Bowie is a few catchy, sweetly sad tunes that got radio play. It wouldn't bug me so much if Bowie was a mostly forgotten weirdo with an exclusive following like Jobriath, but Bowie still has millions and millions of devoted fans. I feel like a dog watching television, you know? Getting nothing out of the images and sounds but suspicious that there's a whole lot of something there I'm just not getting. I feel like the alien. Is that it? Is that what the magnificent bastard is trying to provoke? LOL.


Hmmm...  Maybe?  I'm sort of looking at this from the outside too; I appreciate his music and film work aesthetically, but I don't feel the really powerful emotional attachment to it that you're talking about regarding his diehard fans, and I've always been more of a "be yourself" opponent of gender norms than a "transgress the hell out of those boundaries to make a point!" type.

The video this thread is about certainly shows the kind of meta-viewpoint needed for an appeal to the alienated that, recursively, also makes those who don't "get" the message feel alienated. It puts the "celebrities" in the video in the role of celeb-watchers/paparazzi while casting the actual celebs -Bowie and Tilda- as caricatures of 50s/60s homebodies; it caricatures the celeb/paparazzi as parasites and body-snatchers; the song itself is about how terrible and all-consuming fame is, both to celebs and to fans, but it's chorus expresses the hope that fame and the famous never go away; the "average couple" are first frightened to find themselves on television, then they become puppets of the "celebs" they had watched before, then they become celebs themselves, then they become fascinated with watching their old-selves on the television.

There's all sorts of weird meta-stuff in that video, so yeah; it's a possibility that part of what Bowie's trying to do in his work is make those who don't usually feel out of place in society feel a bit of what it's like to be out of place. I've never really read any interviews he may have given on the philosophy behind his work so I can't say for sure.
 
2013-02-28 09:42:13 PM  
Heron: There's all sorts of weird meta-stuff in that video, so yeah; it's a possibility that part of what Bowie's trying to do in his work is make those who don't usually feel out of place in society feel a bit of what it's like to be out of place. I've never really read any interviews he may have given on the philosophy behind his work so I can't say for sure.

I should hang out with a bunch of Bowie fans for an evening some time to find out what they're like. As I continue to think about this, I begin to think there must be some fundamental difference between us. I suppose they're more like Bowie than I ever was. I was a bit of an introvert as a small child, but I came out of my shell on my own. I'd consider myself more of an outsider perhaps, than a full-blown alien. To me, Bowie seems like a man emotionally locked-in. He has a lot going on inside his head, but he can't express it without chemically altering himself. Even finding himself that outlet, he never really blossoms on his own, but still struggles his whole career to make messages that describe different parts of himself. Also, he's been a monster attention whore. On the other hand, I've spent my life under the radar, looking for my tribe, and steering clear of traps like drugs. It's less of a wonder then, if that's why I fail to identify with some of Bowie's more personal memes.
 
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