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(Yahoo)   High school teacher: " I am supposed to teach you that we are not to call these people terrorists anymore, but freedom fighters." Difficulty: Texas   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 165
    More: Asinine, Texas, muslims, Islamic terrorists, terrorists anymore, high schools, Early Christian, teachers, Egyptian pantheon  
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12814 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Feb 2013 at 9:19 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-26 05:27:47 PM
The CSCOPE curriculum seems to be inherently agenda-driven

Texas should be very experienced in agenda-driven curriculums in their schools.  You reap what you sow.
 
2013-02-26 05:46:59 PM
The CSCOPE curriculum seems to be inherently agenda-driven - particularly in history and social studies courses. The curriculum provider has foisted some on  public school students in The Lone Star State.

Really? Welp, let's look at it, then:

A student in the class told WND that the burqa-related lesson focused mainly on the lives of women in Muslim countries. The enveloping outer face and body covering was treated more or less as a fashion accessory.

Apparently, no mention was made of the fact that women in Saudi Arabia and Iran must wear the garment under threat of arrest and criminal punishment.


Yeah, that's retarded. Cultural relativism is a scientific term, not a moral one; anthropologists need to reserve judgement, but the rest of us are allowed to look at that and say 'yeah, fark no, that's not okay', and you do need to teach children when things are farked up.

For example, CSCOPE has given students material suggesting that Christianity is a cult that parallels the death and resurrection in the story of Osiris, the Egyptian god of the dead. The same material takes pains to point out that early Christians were accused of incest, cannibalism and other atrocities.

...Both of which are  true. Christianity is technically a cult of Judaism depending on which expert you ask,  certainly according to the Bible, and has parallels to a lot of religions. And yes, early Christians were accused of atrocities. Didn't you ever get one of those 'servants will be persecuted alongside their masters' talks?

There's an infamous chart that innocuously describes communism as "the idea of living together in a 'commune' where all people work together for everyone."

Which is true, and the communism you're probably thinking of is actually called Stalinism.  Real communism is, well...as described.

Another notorious CSCOPE lesson (now ostensibly removed from circulation) depicts the Boston Tea Party, the famous protest against taxation without representation, as an act of terrorism.

Not really polite to call the winners terrorists, but yes, under our current definition of the word, it was. Terrorism gets used by good guys, too.

As WND notes, CSCOPE also defines Republicans as lovers of "big business over labor unions." Warm and cuddly Democrats, meanwhile, "will spend more tax dollars on education to benefits [sic] each individual." (The grammar error is CSCOPE's, not WND's.)

So they read the party platforms, then? (Psst--'[sic]' means you don't need to tell us who made the error.  We know.)

CSCOPE labels fascism and Nazism as "conservative," despite the fact that both ideologies prescribe that the state should control everything and own all resources.

Well, yes, that one's true too.

CSCOPE: 5

WND: 1

Horrible, horrible bias, that.
 
2013-02-26 05:53:49 PM

PsiChick: Apparently, no mention was made of the fact that women in Saudi Arabia and Iran must wear the garment under threat of arrest and criminal punishment.

Yeah, that's retarded. Cultural relativism is a scientific term, not a moral one; anthropologists need to reserve judgement, but the rest of us are allowed to look at that and say 'yeah, fark no, that's not okay', and you do need to teach children when things are farked up.


What's not okay and how is it farked up?
 
2013-02-26 05:55:54 PM
I drunk what?

i142.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-26 05:59:59 PM

Precision Boobery: PsiChick: Apparently, no mention was made of the fact that women in Saudi Arabia and Iran must wear the garment under threat of arrest and criminal punishment.

Yeah, that's retarded. Cultural relativism is a scientific term, not a moral one; anthropologists need to reserve judgement, but the rest of us are allowed to look at that and say 'yeah, fark no, that's not okay', and you do need to teach children when things are farked up.

What's not okay and how is it farked up?


Mandating wearing burqas, which, as has been noted, is not mandated in Iran at least, but certainly is de facto mandated in several ME countries. There's some pretty scary horror stories of women dying of asthma attacks because the burqa is basically making it too hot to breathe.
 
2013-02-26 07:02:32 PM
Y'know, the thought just crossed my mind (I know, not a long journey...) that one of the problems in this discussion is that we're using the terms "terrorists" and "freedom fighters" as if they were mutually exclusive. Yet they're not.

Terrorism is a tactic. Freedom is a goal. Two different things.

So terrorists can have any of a number of goals. The DC snipers, for instance, were arguably terrorists, but their goal was to collect a bunch of money. An army fighting to repel conquerors from its country would be freedom fighters, despite using conventional military tactics instead of terrorism. They're not two sides of the same coin -- they're two different coins.

Since WWII has been brought into the thread, it's worth taking a look at some of the unconventional forces that participated. Some of the actions they carried out were undeniably done with the intent of terrorizing their targets -- both occupying armies and collaborators supporting them. They were unquestionably terrorists, and they were unquestionably freedom fighters.

Terrorism is a tactic. Freedom is a goal. Many tactics can be used to achieve the same goal, and the same tactic may be used to achieve many goals. They are not mutually exclusive.
 
2013-02-26 07:27:33 PM

PsiChick: Mandating wearing burqas, which, as has been noted, is not mandated in Iran at least, but certainly is de facto mandated in several ME countries. There's some pretty scary horror stories of women dying of asthma attacks because the burqa is basically making it too hot to breathe.


It may be true that a burqa sometimes makes seeing and breathing more difficult.  It may be true that a burqa offers respiratory and vision protection during dust storms.

So what you're saying is it's not the mandate itself that's wrong, it's the fact that there are no medical exemptions?
 
2013-02-26 07:29:43 PM
This happened in my hometown - and even here, it's scarcely news. That's one advantage to small town talk - the names of people involved gets out and everyone can pretty much figure out the truth.

Saw a reference to Beaumont (7 miles down the road) earlier, recently named the saddest city in America!

http://www.texasmonthly.com/story/beaumont-saddest-city-america
 
2013-02-26 08:12:14 PM

PsiChick: There's some pretty scary horror stories


Yes, but they are supposed to be scary. They are HORROR stories.
 
2013-02-26 08:12:46 PM

Glockenspiel Hero: That is a simplification. Many did go on to fight the Taliban. Some others became it. Osama Bin Laden got his start by funding the Mujahideen.

As far as being moderate, that's a rather bizarre statement. They were indeed freedom fighters (against the Russian invasion) but to call them moderate or freedom loving by Western standards is a huge stretch. At best they were warlords- after the Russian withdrawl they didn't form any kind of coherent government but went back to fighting with each other. The Taliban took over simply because they could unite.

The main guy we supported after withdrawl took the weapons we gave him and shelled Kabul, killing thousands- not exactly the activity you want in a "moderate element"


You're sorta committing a composition fallacy. The United States supported some mujahadeen fighters. Not all. Pakistan and Saudia Arabia also supported some mujahadeen fighters but not all. Some we supported went on to form the Northern Alliance. In the case of Hekmatyar, he benefited due to our giving money to Pakistan and them distributing the money as they saw fit and favoring Hekmatyar. In the US, he wasn't very popular and was "accepted" only in as far as we couldn't cut him out initially. In the US he was one of a few who never met with Reagan. Of course, had he, he'd have been singled out in the photo unlike the other nationalistic mujahadeen leaders who opposed the Taliban that were actually in the photo.

Eventually near the late 80s the US did exert pressure on the ISI and cut off aid specifically to Hekmatyar to which he announced demands that the US and Soviets stop arming either side.

So he wasn't "the main guy we supported" in as much was he was the main guy the ISI supported and funded with our cash till we demanded they stop.  In fact looking at the list I could find, he was the biggest one but one of only a few leaders that went over to the Taliban. The bulk of the men Reagan met seemed to support the Northern Alliance and had it not been for the ISI favoring Hekmatyar, the gov't post-war would have worked.
 
2013-02-26 08:17:15 PM

PsiChick: Precision Boobery: PsiChick: Apparently, no mention was made of the fact that women in Saudi Arabia and Iran must wear the garment under threat of arrest and criminal punishment.

Yeah, that's retarded. Cultural relativism is a scientific term, not a moral one; anthropologists need to reserve judgement, but the rest of us are allowed to look at that and say 'yeah, fark no, that's not okay', and you do need to teach children when things are farked up.

What's not okay and how is it farked up?

Mandating wearing burqas, which, as has been noted, is not mandated in Iran at least, but certainly is de facto mandated in several ME countries. There's some pretty scary horror stories of women dying of asthma attacks because the burqa is basically making it too hot to breathe.


Except that isn't really true. There is certainly no widespread enforcement of an unoffial burka mandate. In fact, some countries, such as Syria, actually restrict the wearing of it.
Primarily it is enforced under tribal warlords in Pakistan and Afghanistan (formerly close allies of the Taliban).

Head scarves are legally mandated in 2 countries and significant social pressure exists throughout the world for muslim women to comply. But very similar ideas have only been out of style for 50 years or so in the west and are really not any different that enforcing modest by outlawing women from being in public without a top.
 
2013-02-27 05:39:44 AM
Did they teach black history month with fried chicken and watermelon, too?
 
2013-02-27 12:34:33 PM

Precision Boobery: PsiChick: Mandating wearing burqas, which, as has been noted, is not mandated in Iran at least, but certainly is de facto mandated in several ME countries. There's some pretty scary horror stories of women dying of asthma attacks because the burqa is basically making it too hot to breathe.

It may be true that a burqa sometimes makes seeing and breathing more difficult.  It may be true that a burqa offers respiratory and vision protection during dust storms.

So what you're saying is it's not the mandate itself that's wrong, it's the fact that there are no medical exemptions?


No, it's just worth noting. Still wrong to dictate how people dress.

dywed88: Except that isn't really true. There is certainly no widespread enforcement of an unoffial burka mandate. In fact, some countries, such as Syria, actually restrict the wearing of it.
Primarily it is enforced under tribal warlords in Pakistan and Afghanistan (formerly close allies of the Taliban).

Head scarves are legally mandated in 2 countries and significant social pressure exists throughout the world for muslim women to comply. But very similar ideas have only been out of style for 50 years or so in the west and are really not any different that enforcing modest by outlawing women from being in public without a top.


Wrong person to argue that to; I support letting people walk around stark naked if they feel the need. :p
 
2013-02-27 02:49:21 PM
Rapmaster2000:  Civil_War2_Time: Rapmaster2000: cameroncrazy1984: Civil_War2_Time: Most Texans blame Californians for ruining the "silicon hills" label we had back in the early 2000s, with their uppity attitudes and lackluster work ethic. Much of the .com bust we had in Austin during that time-frame was due to Californians.
That's some fine stereotypin' there, Lou.
/seriously, replace Californians with "blacks" or "indians" and then read that
It's commonly known as "the people I don't like are the ones who do/did that thing I don't like".  Also known as using confirmation bias in a post-hoc analysis.

Nah. Ask most Austinites (who are native Texans) who's to blame for the .com bust and subsequent downfall of traditional Austin, and you'll hear the same sentiment that I've stated.
That doesn't surprise me.  It's a common sentiment that the newcomers ruin everything good.  America has been ruined by newcomers since the Germans arrived in Pennsylvania.  The Irish ruined Chicago and then the Poles ruined Chicago and then the blacks ruined Chicago and now it's the Mexicans.  Someone is always ruining someplace.
You've ruined every place you've moved to.  You can count on it.


He agrees
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
 
2013-02-27 07:37:20 PM

Lee Jackson Beauregard: I drunk what?

[i142.photobucket.com image 240x240]


LOL funny and clever :D
 
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