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(The Week)   So, you think Latin is a dead language, eh?   (theweek.com) divider line 35
    More: Interesting, English Words, Latin, dead languages, Julius Caesar, English, plural, common words, panacea  
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3443 clicks; posted to Geek » on 26 Feb 2013 at 8:40 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-26 08:44:28 AM  
Latin has had an interesting history with the English language.

The Norman conquest brought about a new view of Englishry. English was seen for a time as vulgar. If you were English you were unsophisticated and you were to be avoided.

Because of this even to this day Latin and French terms are highly preferred over the native English ones
 
2013-02-26 08:44:47 AM  
It is. I learned it in school and haven't used it once since.
 
2013-02-26 08:48:10 AM  
Yes I do think Latin is a dead language.  Call me when you see thousands of three-year olds speaking it.

/For heaven's sake, one would have to pretty damned ignorant not known that large parts of English vocabulary were derived from Latin.   And indeed FAR larger parts of the romance languages especially Italian were as well.
 
2013-02-26 08:52:17 AM  
I learned it as part of my degree in classics and it is serving me very well.

But as there is no such thing as a native speaker, it is, in fact, a dead language.
 
2013-02-26 08:52:52 AM  
Though Castillian Spanish is actually really really close...
 
2013-02-26 08:55:01 AM  
What's this, then? "Romanes eunt domus"? People called Romanes, they go, the house?
 
2013-02-26 09:00:36 AM  
But Julius Caesar (pronounced Yulius Kaisar) pronounced most of these words differently than an English speaker would.

Virus  - veeroos

Panacea - panakayuh

Iris - eereess

Alibi - aleebee
 
2013-02-26 09:06:17 AM  

jigger: But Julius Caesar (pronounced Yulius Kaisar) pronounced most of these words differently than an English speaker would.

Virus  - veeroos

Panacea - panakayuh

Iris - eereess

Alibi - aleebee


I was very surprised when I took a Latin class and heard the words pronounced out loud. Didn't sound snooty at all like I imagined it would.
 
2013-02-26 09:49:01 AM  
I took Latin all the way from junior high through college.

I'm a welder now. I build inland and ocean-going barges.

But damn if I can't rock a crossword. The etymology aid it provides is also quite handy to understanding new words, and unknown words from other Romance languages.
 
2013-02-26 09:52:30 AM  

jigger: But Julius Caesar (pronounced Yulius Kaisar) pronounced most of these words differently than an English speaker would.

Virus  - veeroos


wouldn't it be weeroos, I thought the 'v' was a 'w' sound.

\\ don't know latin
\ seem to recall the 'v' thing
 
2013-02-26 09:56:17 AM  
Yep, Latin follows all the rules required to be considered a dead language.

//No forensics involved.
 
2013-02-26 10:18:59 AM  
So what you're saying is, feminists are poison and dangerous.

'Splains a lot.

/for commonly used Latin words, please see medical terminology
//vagina
 
2013-02-26 11:14:34 AM  

LDM90: jigger: But Julius Caesar (pronounced Yulius Kaisar) pronounced most of these words differently than an English speaker would.

Virus  - veeroos

Panacea - panakayuh

Iris - eereess

Alibi - aleebee

I was very surprised when I took a Latin class and heard the words pronounced out loud. Didn't sound snooty at all like I imagined it would.


That's what is taught as to how it is spoken.  However, the lineage of actual speakers was broken.  So the best anyone can do is make certain assumptions about how things were pronounced.  Interesting all around really.
 
2013-02-26 01:03:13 PM  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=976mmTNbLbg
 
2013-02-26 01:04:32 PM  

SMB2811: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=976mmTNbLbg


Well I'm an idiot

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=976mmTNbLbg

Sed, mihi nuntiatum est Romanum undique oppugnari, sed imperator nihil fecisse, praeter matrem venenavisse equumque uxorem duxisse. Itaque, senatus copias e Britannia revocare ad civitatem nostram imperialem defendam constituit.
 
2013-02-26 01:14:41 PM  

BafflerMeal: That's what is taught as to how it is spoken. However, the lineage of actual speakers was broken. So the best anyone can do is make certain assumptions about how things were pronounced. Interesting all around really.


Our knowledge of Latin sounds is much better than just assumptions.  The lineage of actual speakers isn't, in fact, broken.  Every native speaker of Romance languages is part of a lineage straight from Latin.  And although those langauges have changed a lot from Latin, they mostly changed in different ways, and there's enough of them hanging around for linguists to reconstruct the original Latin pronounciations.  That, along with clues such as poetic meters, spellings of loan words, and old farts who wrote to complain about the way younguns talk.
 
2013-02-26 01:17:12 PM  
Lorum ipsum dolor sit amet...
 
2013-02-26 01:27:46 PM  
Some more Latin words we use in English every day:

Ashtray - trash
Outlay - lout
Overlay -  lover
Underplay - plunder
 
2013-02-26 01:48:20 PM  
Richard Saunders
So what you're saying is, feminists are poison and dangerous.

'Splains a lot.

/for commonly used Latin words, please see medical terminology
//vagina


Speaking of words derived from Latin and feminists, "femina" is Latin for "woman".
Latin is also a great language for feminists, what with the presence of a single dick being the thing that decides the linguistic gender of a crowd of people.

For example, a Latin word for "pupil" or "student" (btw: "student"="they strive for s.th.") is "discipulus" (male) or "discipula" (female).
A group of male students would be "discipuli" and a group of female students would be "discipulae".
But should one of the guys wander over, a group of 500 "discipulae" would turn into 501 "discipuli" thanks to his presence.
So to be somewhat more PC, my Latin lessons usually started with the teacher greeting us with "Salvete discipulae discipulique!"


/ had Latin from grade 5 to 13 in school
 
2013-02-26 02:22:43 PM  
SMB2811
Sed, mihi nuntiatum est Romanum undique oppugnari, sed imperator nihil fecisse, praeter matrem venenavisse equumque uxorem duxisse. Itaque, senatus copias e Britannia revocare ad civitatem nostram imperialem defendam constituit.


www.clusterfake.net


WHO are they attacking? The city or a single Roman guy?
The city?
What gender do city names usually have. Yes, female.
So what's the name of the city? Right, it's "Roma".
And its accusative is... Romam.
So that would be "Romam undique oppugnari"

---
Hmm, lets see..

"But, it has been reported to me that Rome is being attacked from all sides, but the Imperator did nothing except to poison [his] mother and to take a horse as a wife.
So the senate has decided to recall troops [supplies? assets?] from Britain to defend our imperial citizenry."
 
2013-02-26 02:43:06 PM  
Yon Cassius has a lean and hungry look.  He could use more of my size twelve footus up his assus.

But always, I am Caesar.
 
2013-02-26 03:04:10 PM  
How can it be dead?  It's the languguage they speak in Latin America.

Yeah, I went there...somebody had to.
 
2013-02-26 04:38:01 PM  

kevinfra: How can it be dead?  It's the languguage they speak in Latin America.

Yeah, I went there...somebody had to.


I read somewhere once that of all the various Romance languages, Spanish (and Latin American Spanish in particular, but minus the Arabic loan words) was actually the closest to Latin.  Provencal and Catalan were also pretty close, too.
 
2013-02-26 05:52:56 PM  

Mad Canadian: Lorum ipsum dolor sit amet...


Cornelia et Flavia sunt puellam Romani
 
2013-02-26 06:37:12 PM  
Fano
Cornelia et Flavia sunt puellam Romani


www.clusterfake.net


How many girls are there?
More than one, so "puellam" needs to be plural.
And they are "who or what", so you better make that nominative "puellae", not accusative "puellas":
"Cornelia et Flavia sunt puellae"
And "Romani"?
The adjective follows its noun and its noun is girls and girls are female (unless further evidence is being provided).
So make that "Cornelia et Flavia puellae Romanae sunt".
;-)
 
2013-02-26 06:45:28 PM  

The Voice of Doom: Fano
Cornelia et Flavia sunt puellam Romani

[www.clusterfake.net image 162x100]


How many girls are there?
More than one, so "puellam" needs to be plural.
And they are "who or what", so you better make that nominative "puellae", not accusative "puellas":
"Cornelia et Flavia sunt puellae"
And "Romani"?
The adjective follows its noun and its noun is girls and girls are female (unless further evidence is being provided).
So make that "Cornelia et Flavia puellae Romanae sunt".
;-)


Cornelia et Flavia amat nautae
 
2013-02-26 08:05:31 PM  

kevinfra: How can it be dead?  It's the languguage they speak in Latin America.

Yeah, I went there...somebody had to.


I'm a Latin prof.  I once taught a gen-ed course on Greek and Latin word roots in English.  It was a basic 2-credit course, mostly for freshmen and ESL students.
On the final exam I needed one more point, so I gave them the insultingly simple "Which people spoke Latin as their native language?" question.
Guy who had barely attended all semester did, in fact, respond "the Latin Americans".
/wish I could have failed him just for that.
//he failed all on his own, so it worked out.
 
2013-02-26 08:54:38 PM  

Fano: The Voice of Doom: Fano
Cornelia et Flavia sunt puellam Romani

[www.clusterfake.net image 162x100]


How many girls are there?
More than one, so "puellam" needs to be plural.
And they are "who or what", so you better make that nominative "puellae", not accusative "puellas":
"Cornelia et Flavia sunt puellae"
And "Romani"?
The adjective follows its noun and its noun is girls and girls are female (unless further evidence is being provided).
So make that "Cornelia et Flavia puellae Romanae sunt".
;-)

Cornelia et Flavia amat nautae


Cornelia et Flavia nautas amant. (The sailors are the direct object, so you use the plural accusative, not the nominative. Because two girls love the sailors, not one, you would use the third-person plural, amant, not the third person singular, amat. Although word order is less important in Latin than in English, verbs usually go at the end of the sentence. Now go and write it out a hundred times, and if you haven't finished by sunrise, I'l cut your balls off.)
 
2013-02-26 09:12:37 PM  
Only on Fark could this thread exist, let alone make sense. Well done.
 
2013-02-26 10:11:56 PM  

escherblacksmith: jigger: But Julius Caesar (pronounced Yulius Kaisar) pronounced most of these words differently than an English speaker would.

Virus  - veeroos

wouldn't it be weeroos, I thought the 'v' was a 'w' sound.

\\ don't know latin
\ seem to recall the 'v' thing


Yes, weeroos. And alibi would be more like alibee. Latin did distinguish between long and short vowels.
 
2013-02-26 10:14:35 PM  
Dominus vobiscum nabisco. Espiritu sanctum. De gustibus.

Me gustibus. You gustibus. We missed the bus. They missed the bus.

When's the next bus?

Summa cum laude. Magna cum laude. The radio's too laude. Adeste fidelis.

Centra fidelis. High fidelis.

Post meridian. Ante meridian. Uncle meridian. All of the little meridians.

Magna carta. Master charga.

Dum procellas. Lotsa Vitalis.
 
2013-02-27 12:49:10 AM  
O ubi ubi sububi?
 
2013-02-27 11:18:08 AM  
 
2013-02-27 12:06:55 PM  
Ecce! In pictura est puella, nomine Cornelia.
 
2013-02-27 08:33:28 PM  

Intelligent_Donkey: Ecce! In pictura est puella, nomine Cornelia.



http://cdn.memegenerator.net/instances/400x/18632738.jpg

This guy gets it
 
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