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(NPR)   Working from home: is it the end of productivity, or the future of work? Depends on how seriously you take your job, I suppose   (npr.org) divider line 124
    More: Interesting, Marissa Mayer, knowledge workers, Patent and Trademark, employee benefit, web app, productivity  
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5158 clicks; posted to Main » on 26 Feb 2013 at 6:40 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-26 12:06:48 AM  
Having worked from home, it was one of the greatest perks ever.
 
2013-02-26 12:12:36 AM  
I get more done when i work from home, and it's nice not having people drop by my cube to BS constantly. Although my cats hang out with me and try to "help."

It's the greatest thing ever.
 
2013-02-26 12:12:52 AM  
I can't wait to get on the USPTO work at home program, it's pretty great.
 
2013-02-26 12:18:26 AM  
I'm WAY more productive at home because people aren't stopping by to bother me all day. I save up my drudge work for my telework day each week because I know I can really get some shiat done.

If people are obviously abusing the privilege, you have 3 options: warn them, rescind telework for them, or fire them. The same as if they were unproductive while in the office. This is not a difficult proposition.
 
2013-02-26 12:21:02 AM  
I worked from home for a few years, it was the best thing ever.  I was more productive, and putting in another 2 hours for what used to be my commute didn't bother me.
Eating with metal utensils and drinking from a real glass while working was a huge perk.  It's the little touches of dignity that we so often overlook when someone's not wearing pants.
 
2013-02-26 12:47:01 AM  
Dear Princess Marissa,

I'd be the first to say that Yahoo! needs to be refactored from the ground up, and I'd be the first to acknowledge that physical presence helps when it comes to cross-fertilization of ideas, but are you really that interested in facetime, or are you interested in cutting headcount without having to actually use the word "layoff"?

By the way, princess, your predecessors should have sold to MSFT years ago when he had the chance. Seriously, YHOO. MSFT bid $31/share for you dumb farks in 2008, except that your board had its head up its ass like a multibillion-dollar Ouroborous and let it fall through.

Whatever the fark was wrong with you then is what the fark is still wrong with you now. You're not in business for the sake of remaining independent, you're in business to make money for the shareholders. The employees got farked either way, the least you could have done is admitted defeat and become one with the borg when you had the chance. At least someone would have made money over the past five years.

Wow. That escalated quickly. I'm just glad that I neither work for now own shares in YHOO, or it probably would have been worse. I'm OK with a little bit of facetime every now and then even in the context of a distributed team, but I don't know what's the more frightening implication: either Princess Marissa is trying to disguise layoffs/constructive dismissals as something other than what they are, or she drank a little too much of Google's cultural kool-aid and has gone full-retard against remote work.

Your grateful bystander,
Twilight Farkle.
 
2013-02-26 01:23:39 AM  
I find I do much better when working from home.  I often find myself working longer hours as well.
 
2013-02-26 01:28:29 AM  
When at home I find it difficult to get that same furtive thrill of masturbating at my work station, and it's a lot harder to hear the "fries are done" alarm.
 
2013-02-26 01:28:33 AM  

Twilight Farkle: At least someone would have made money over the past five years.


The movie Frequency's ending wouldn't be quite as stupid either.
 
2013-02-26 01:38:31 AM  
In the 80's I worked from home and got quite a bit done.  Even better, my code was portable as I had a Z-80 (TRS-80), and we had an 8088 at work.  But I quickly learned that time not spent in the office was time spent not working, no matter you turned in better code ahead of schedule.  Sigh.

In the 90's I was a consultant.  Quickly learned that if my body wasn't inside the building I couldn't bill the hours.  sigh

In the 00's I worked for a great company.  I wanted to go to work every day; I liked the people, I liked my office, I loved my work.  I still worked from home, but it was on top of 9+ hours a day spent in the office.  Got divorced.  sigh.

Now I'm semi retired, don't work at all.  sigh.
 
2013-02-26 01:43:49 AM  
Now that I think of it, by the time I worked from home in the 80's I was on a Leading Edge PC 98% compatable clone, running an 8088, and at work we had the 8086.
 
2013-02-26 01:48:34 AM  

davidphogan: Having worked from home, it was one of the greatest perks ever.


THIS.

I've been working at home for the last year, and my time on Fark has fallen off a cliff... I wouldn't dare fark this up and wind up back in some godforsaken cubicle hell.
 
2013-02-26 01:50:38 AM  

davidphogan: Twilight Farkle: At least someone would have made money over the past five years.

The movie Frequency's ending wouldn't be quite as stupid either.


Attention everybody in 1999 and 2000: If you're reading this in 1999 or 2000 and YHOO is trading over $45, sell now. You won't make a dime in the next 13 years. The punchline, of course, is that with 20/20 hindsight, the same comment applies as much to MSFT as it does to YHOO. Shoulda, woulda, coulda...

/but didn't.
 
2013-02-26 02:50:49 AM  
I hired, developed all the processes for, and managed an entire team of programmers in four locations on two continents for a large company from a comfy lounge chair behind a desk in my home office. I still try to work from home now once a week if I can, I get caught up on all the email I missed during the week dealing with the crisis du jour.

Like everything else, some people can do it some can't. I can sit surrounded by toys and not get distracted, others not so much, and lots of those people kick ass in the office so it's not a general employee quality thing but just personality.
 
2013-02-26 02:54:27 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: When at home I find it difficult to get that same furtive thrill of masturbating at my work station, and it's a lot harder to hear the "fries are done" alarm.


Ok, that was funny as all hell.

/has you farked as 'Montreal Otter Squat'.  Can't remember why

ThatGuyGreg: I've been working at home for the last year, and my time on Fark has fallen off a cliff... I wouldn't dare fark this up and wind up back in some godforsaken cubicle hell.


That line really tempted me to sponsor you for TF, but even I'm not that big of a dick.

I've been self-employed and officeless for 6 years now.  It's fantastic.  I get more done laying on my back and before I put pants on than I do the rest of the day.  Just about every day I wind up on my laptop taking care of the last few issues from the 'south boardroom'- the pub that I frequent and take meetings in.  Really, there's very little work that can't be done with a beer in hand.
 
2013-02-26 06:27:52 AM  
I like working from home because in quiet moments I can play games. There, I said the truth. You all do it too. If not - I apologise for apparently ruining it for the rest of you :(
 
2013-02-26 06:45:06 AM  
I would love to work from home, but my wife somehow misunderstands my presence at home as making me somehow responsible for helping her with her chores.

Washing the dishes and cleaning the house are your jobs, honey. I'll be over here making money.
 
2013-02-26 06:48:20 AM  
I've worked from home for 5 years now, and I would sooner kill a puppy with a dead kitten before I worked in an office with people. Freelance is where it's at. Pajamas, pot, cartoons, and laptop. Good times.

/office politics and bosses can EABOD
//fark your kids girl scout cookies
 
2013-02-26 06:53:28 AM  
Now if I could just convince DISA and DSS to let me have a SIPRnet drop in my home, life would be sweet and I'd never have to commute to the office again.
 
2013-02-26 06:55:12 AM  
media.npr.org
Marissa Mayer is kinda hot. Obviously a shiatty CEO, though.
 
2013-02-26 06:55:59 AM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: [media.npr.org image 462x346]
Marissa Mayer is kinda hot. Obviously a shiatty CEO, though.


Hot enough to jizz on her face and use her hair as a nutrag.
 
2013-02-26 06:57:13 AM  
I went into the office for two days last week for the first time in a while, and got way less done.

People will just come into your cube and hang out. I have shiat to do!
 
2013-02-26 07:01:17 AM  
FTA:   43 percent of workers said they've watched TV or a movie while teleworking, 35 percent have done household chores, and 28 percent copped to cooking dinner while "working".

Yeah, in the office time is wasted in other ways.

/Bonus: unlike office wasted time, home wasted time is also known as "living your life"
//Who cares so long as you get the job done?
///(told I need 3 of these)
 
2013-02-26 07:02:35 AM  
working from home boosts my productivity.... on Fark
 
2013-02-26 07:06:29 AM  
NO, she's not hot.
And yes, Yahoo is the AOL of the 21st Century.
Yahoo sucks, Ray. And there's nothing the princess can do about that.
 
2013-02-26 07:07:35 AM  
I get to work from home when the weather is bad (if the school has a snow day, I work from home)
 
2013-02-26 07:07:59 AM  
Yahoo is learning why you don't hire someone from Google to run your company, just as JCPenney learned you don't hire some dick from Apple to run your company.
 
2013-02-26 07:08:02 AM  
There are personality types who can get more done when they are not being interrupted constantly.  I am one of those people.   Just 2 days a week where I do not have people constantly dropping by my desk, interns and new employees asking questions etc...  I save the tedious work for WFH days.   Since I am in the Atlanta area, driving to work and back can take 3-4 hours out of each day and I see it as a waste of gas and energy.   To go through all that trouble so a manager can walk by once or 2x a week is foolish and stupid.  We save team meetings for a day once a week when everyone is in the office rather than have them every day.

Letting me work from home is like giving me money without a raise and making me work in the office costs me extra money and makes me want to leave the company to go work for someone who will treat me better.    You can only treat mature adults like children if they are stuck and cannot leave their jobs, but beware that the resentment you cause will reflect on the company.
 
2013-02-26 07:10:02 AM  
I prefer it... Right now, I'm teaching three classes, two days a week, but the other four days I work, I'm far more productive at home than I am going into the studio. First I don't waste gas. No getting aggravated with traffic or trying to find a parking space. Don't have to deal with anyone else's dramas or egos, and I can break up my work day as I see fit. I'm far more productive early in the morning, and l usually leave all my menial tasks and what not for the late afternoon when I'm usually not as creative.

I've actually been working in three hour intervals (taking an hour or so off in between) for the last few weeks on a colleague's recommendation... It's amazing how much I can get done and the concepts and ideas come a lot easier when I'm not forcing myself to be creative.
 
2013-02-26 07:11:03 AM  
/the funniest part is that yahoo actually thinks it needs a ceo to manage the garbage that goes on there.
 
2013-02-26 07:12:37 AM  
I want to work from home but I can't convince them to purchase the lab equipment...
 
2013-02-26 07:14:47 AM  
I don't know about bagging on Marissa Mayer. Yahoo was a crap company with a revolving door of CEOs before she came in. Dumping this perk makes sense since she has to get everyone on the same page for the new direction of the company. I get the Yahoo employee complaints, but then again, these people work for Yahoo!, so I have to question how much they know.

Even the US Patent Office is a dubious example, since the patent system is systemically broken and no amount of adopting modern work arrangements is going to solve that.
 
2013-02-26 07:24:59 AM  
I work at home one or two days a week, and as a general rule, am tremendously more productive there than at the office.  As a litigator, if I don't have to be in court or with a client, whether I'm sitting in front of a computer in my office or at my house doesn't matter.  Only difference is that in my house, the computer is better, 5x faster, the screen is bigger and the printer/scanner  is a foot away.  Also, I don't lose 2 billable hours per day commuting and chatting with people dropping in who apparently have far less to do than I do.  A 10 hour day worked from home is substantially less soul draining than being down at the office.
 
2013-02-26 07:25:38 AM  
I agree about that "getting a helluva lot more done" when working from home. I have a needy cat who interrupts me a helluva lot less than the average co-worker. The only thing I'd worry about is that if I can work from home, somebody else could do my job from Bangalore for half the price.
 
2013-02-26 07:25:51 AM  
I work from home a lot and am far more productive. On days when I have to go into the office, I work only while I'm there. Once I leave for the day, I'm done. When I WFH on the other hand, I leave my laptop connected and am willing to answer emails, work issues etc. through the evening. Even random work on weekend.  It's called give and take.

If you're willing to be flexible with me, I'll be flexible for you. You want to enforce ridged rules about me being in the office? Fine. But don't expect the same flexibility out of me then either.
 
2013-02-26 07:28:54 AM  
Eh, I'll admit to being a lazy ass when working for home.  I remember that I just don't want to work and then don't have the benefit of not being away from home to motivate me to work.  Over all, I like the hours better, but I'm guessing I just lack the discipline.
 
2013-02-26 07:39:50 AM  
yeah but you tend to eat in rather than eat out at Jimmy John's every day
 
2013-02-26 07:40:23 AM  
I'm generally more productive in the office than I am at home, thanks to better Internet access at home and no distraction from my feline assistants.  The most productive places of all for me are fast food restaurants, but purchasing a dollar's worth of food every hour gets expensive.  (Cafes and pubs, not so much, because they are not as well lit.)
 
2013-02-26 07:43:28 AM  

Yamaneko2: I'm generally more productive in the office than I am at home, thanks to better Internet access at home and no distraction from my feline assistants.  The most productive places of all for me are fast food restaurants, but purchasing a dollar's worth of food every hour gets expensive.  (Cafes and pubs, not so much, because they are not as well lit.)


A cheeseburger and fries are expensive? Assuming 9 bucks for an average cheesburger and fries plate. 9 dollars/9 hours...
 
2013-02-26 07:46:40 AM  
Productivity:  Is it the end-all measurement of worth, or will future companies value more important things?  Depends on who you work for, I guess.
 
2013-02-26 07:52:23 AM  

sendtodave: Productivity:  Is it the end-all measurement of worth, or will future companies value more important things?  Depends on who you work for, I guess.


Lots of companies value bs facetime/asskissing more than being productive. Those companies are bad.
 
2013-02-26 07:53:34 AM  

robohobo: sendtodave: Productivity:  Is it the end-all measurement of worth, or will future companies value more important things?  Depends on who you work for, I guess.

Lots of companies value bs facetime/asskissing more than being productive. Those companies are bad.


why do you say that?
 
2013-02-26 07:55:58 AM  
Maybe instead of getting rid of it altogether, they could just evaluate all current wfm employees and fire the nonproductive ones?  I guess that would take too much effort.
 
2013-02-26 07:56:33 AM  
Since I'm the only person who actively uses their Yahoo! email account, they should have consulted with me, since that's probably the only thing that's keeping them in business.
 
2013-02-26 07:56:40 AM  
*wfh

Maybe I should start a coffee habit...
 
2013-02-26 07:57:21 AM  
Working at home is a total productivity killer for a large company that doesn't have good governance of employee performance. This is what happened with Yahoo! Basically -

a) Managers got busy at work and weren't regularly checking up on employees.
b) There wasn't a corporate communication plan in place to tackle work at home employment.
c) KPI's for productivity weren't clearly set.

In an environment where no one is measuring your work output, no one is regularly talking to you, and your manager isn't regularly watching you, let's be honest - how many of us would REALLY bother to put in any time other than the bare minimum to keep up appearances.

Maybe the rest of you are farking angels, but it if was me I would be collecting the sweet Yahoo! paycheck and then either playing FTL all day or working on my web strip poker start up. I'm pretty certain that I'm in the majority with this self assessment.
 
2013-02-26 07:58:42 AM  

TheSelphie: *wfh

Maybe I should start a coffee habit...


why the hell not, it's just as bad as ephedrine, which i'm sure you do a lot of already
 
2013-02-26 07:59:46 AM  

Jon iz teh kewl: yeah but you tend to eat in rather than eat out at Jimmy John's every day


Jimmy Johns delivers, FTW.
 
2013-02-26 08:00:53 AM  
Working from home right now.

Of course, I'm wasting time on Fark. Then again, that's only 45 seconds, vs. the hour long BS session I was forced to endure yesterday about the race and Danica last Sunday.
 
2013-02-26 08:02:34 AM  
I get a lot more done when WFH. The TV might be on but it's muted and I'm not actually watching it. If I make dinner it's 2 minutes to throw in a crockpot. I work longer hours when WFH too. I'm always available via the phone after hours & weekends if work needs me. I agree with the others...take away all my WFH and then don't bother me on MY time!

/Good luck with that collaboration Yahoo. All the good people are gonna collaborate on getting a new job.
// Yes, I let my employees WFH. It was only an issue one time and as a manager I dealt with it....do your job managers.
 
2013-02-26 08:03:03 AM  

robohobo: sendtodave: Productivity:  Is it the end-all measurement of worth, or will future companies value more important things?  Depends on who you work for, I guess.

Lots of companies value bs facetime/asskissing more than being productive. Those companies are bad.


http://groups.csail.mit.edu/mac/users/rauch/worktime/

An average worker needs to work a mere 11 hours per week to produce as much as one working 40 hours per week in 1950

Even since 1975, supposedly an era of low productivity growth and stagnation in living standards, officially measured productivity has increased almost 70%. The average worker would therefore need to work only 23 hours per week to produce as much as one working as recently as 1975

And, if the productivity measures have any meaning, the average worker could have a 29-hour workweek if he were satisfied with producing as much as a 40-hour worker as recently as 1990.

I'm not sure, I don't think that's even counting automation.

We've productively eliminated much of our workforce.  Outsourced the rest.  And then we complain that they are leeches on society.

Anyway, we're productive enough. We need to focus less on productivity, and more on expanding the workforce, and worker well being.

Oh, wait, I almost forgot, quarterly profits are all that matter.
 
2013-02-26 08:03:46 AM  

Jon iz teh kewl: robohobo: sendtodave: Productivity:  Is it the end-all measurement of worth, or will future companies value more important things?  Depends on who you work for, I guess.

Lots of companies value bs facetime/asskissing more than being productive. Those companies are bad.

why do you say that?


It's bad if the facetime and asskissing come at the expense of productivity and money making. Money making being the only reason to be a business. Now if the asskissing and facetime somehow turn into moneymaking, good for them, but I personally want no part of it, because fark asskissing and feelings in business.

TwistedFark: s.

Maybe the rest of you are farking angels, but it if was me I would be collecting the sweet Yahoo! paycheck and then either playing FTL all day or working on my web strip poker start up. I'm pretty certain that I'm in the majority with this self assessment.


In my experience, it's 50/50. I put in a lot of hours at home, explicitly because I loathe a standard job where I have to deal with people face to face and deal with office politics. I work harder at home so I'm WAY covered in people knowing I'm more productive than if I were on-site. That said, I know guys who do shiat-all working from home but still collect the paycheck.
 
2013-02-26 08:06:05 AM  

sendtodave: robohobo: sendtodave: Productivity:  Is it the end-all measurement of worth, or will future companies value more important things?  Depends on who you work for, I guess.

Lots of companies value bs facetime/asskissing more than being productive. Those companies are bad.

http://groups.csail.mit.edu/mac/users/rauch/worktime/

An average worker needs to work a mere 11 hours per week to produce as much as one working 40 hours per week in 1950

Even since 1975, supposedly an era of low productivity growth and stagnation in living standards, officially measured productivity has increased almost 70%. The average worker would therefore need to work only 23 hours per week to produce as much as one working as recently as 1975

And, if the productivity measures have any meaning, the average worker could have a 29-hour workweek if he were satisfied with producing as much as a 40-hour worker as recently as 1990.

I'm not sure, I don't think that's even counting automation.

We've productively eliminated much of our workforce.  Outsourced the rest.  And then we complain that they are leeches on society.

Anyway, we're productive enough. We need to focus less on productivity, and more on expanding the workforce, and worker well being.

Oh, wait, I almost forgot, quarterly profits are all that matter.


Why be in business if not to make money? It's not the business of making nice.
 
2013-02-26 08:06:22 AM  

TwistedFark: Maybe the rest of you are farking angels, but it if was me I would be collecting the sweet Yahoo! paycheck and then either playing FTL all day or working on my web strip poker start up. I'm pretty certain that I'm in the majority with this self assessment.


Doesn't sound like you wouldn't enjoy working for Yahoo if you wouldn't be willing to, you know, work for them.

What if you worked for a web strip poker company?
 
2013-02-26 08:07:15 AM  

Slaxl: I like working from home because in quiet moments I can play games. There, I said the truth. You all do it too. If not - I apologise for apparently ruining it for the rest of you :(


I once took a support call from personnel several hundred miles away while playing xbox.

I kept it on mute the whole time so nobody knew. The questions were simple enough that I never had to pause.
 
2013-02-26 08:08:41 AM  

robohobo: Why be in business if not to make money? It's not the business of making nice.


Huh, I was told that capitalism is better for the common proletariat than the alternative.

Was that wrong?
 
2013-02-26 08:12:08 AM  

sethen320: Slaxl: I like working from home because in quiet moments I can play games. There, I said the truth. You all do it too. If not - I apologise for apparently ruining it for the rest of you :(

I once took a support call from personnel several hundred miles away while playing xbox.

I kept it on mute the whole time so nobody knew. The questions were simple enough that I never had to pause.


We used to take support calls in the middle of Halo LAN parties at work.

Stuff like that is why I didn't burn out and quit (which would, of course, force them to get a new hire and train them).

I saved them money by playing games at work.  The horror.
 
2013-02-26 08:12:18 AM  

robohobo: Jon iz teh kewl: robohobo: sendtodave: Productivity:  Is it the end-all measurement of worth, or will future companies value more important things?  Depends on who you work for, I guess.

Lots of companies value bs facetime/asskissing more than being productive. Those companies are bad.

why do you say that?

It's bad if the facetime and asskissing come at the expense of productivity and money making. Money making being the only reason to be a business. Now if the asskissing and facetime somehow turn into moneymaking, good for them, but I personally want no part of it, because fark asskissing and feelings in business.TwistedFark: s.

Maybe the rest of you are farking angels, but it if was me I would be collecting the sweet Yahoo! paycheck and then either playing FTL all day or working on my web strip poker start up. I'm pretty certain that I'm in the majority with this self assessment.

In my experience, it's 50/50. I put in a lot of hours at home, explicitly because I loathe a standard job where I have to deal with people face to face and deal with office politics. I work harder at home so I'm WAY covered in people knowing I'm more productive than if I were on-site. That said, I know guys who do shiat-all working from home but still collect the paycheck.


This is sort of my point. Even Branson who came out slamming Yahoo! for this move was very careful to caveat it with the fact that you need to have the proper tools and "communication" in place, basically - check ups on the employees, built into your program.

He's right (of course he's right, he's Richard Branson I guess).

I reckon Yahoo! is probably just like a million other companies out there and has problems forming cohesive strategies to measure their productivity and because of that can't accurately put in controls to make sure that people aren't gaming them for a paycheck and then farking off.

I'll be really brutally honest here - I don't consider myself an bad person, but if I did WFH regularly there is no way I would put in a full work week of effort for 2 reasons: 1) I'm certainly I don't need to do it in order to be better than everyone else, and that's pretty much the only measurement that matters in most organisations, right? 2) My time is valuable and I'd rather spend it working on something else that's going to generate me more money.

Hell, I have a 92 page functional specification on my desktop right now for a piece of software I am going to get built so I can hawk it and I had to put this together in my own spare time. If I was here at home I can guarentee you it'd be 50% me working on my application architecture for my own private project at a bare minimum - and the funny thing is, in our society if I do get this software built and make a million dollars off it, I'm a FREAKING HERO instead of a thief. Because that's what we reward in corporate america - success and self interest, not loyalty.
 
2013-02-26 08:13:27 AM  
A lot of people are conflating working at home because you're self-employed with teleworking. Those are two separate things. TFA is really about the latter.

Personally, I don't buy that anyone should be more productive at home--not if your team is run right. If you're more productive at home because you're not interrupted by excessive chit-chat, or the workplace is miserable, then your team has a personality/culture problem. If you're more productive because you're not interrupted by excessive work-related questions, then your team has a workflow/hierarchy problem.

The only valid productivity argument is the time saved on the commute. Teleworking is a concession offered to attract and retain employees, not a way to boost productivity directly. Again, that's just my opinion.
 
2013-02-26 08:13:45 AM  
I guess Marissa didn't have enough people around the office to slobber over her latest $10,000 outfit.
 
2013-02-26 08:15:33 AM  
Everyone in this thread is missing the point:

For Marisa, it's " God, family, and Yahoo!".

For her employees, it should be "Yahoo!, Yahoo!, and Yahoo!".

Frankly, i believe this is a deliberate move to 'trim the fat' at Yahoo! by pissing off a lot of people into leaving. That way, she doesn't come across as a coont for taking all that sweet CEO money while shiatcanning a bunch of people to cut costs. Seriously, why the hell does Yahoo! need 11,500 employees?
 
2013-02-26 08:16:15 AM  

TwistedFark: robohobo: Jon iz teh kewl: robohobo: sendtodave: Productivity:  Is it the end-all measurement of worth, or will future companies value more important things?  Depends on who you work for, I guess.

Lots of companies value bs facetime/asskissing more than being productive. Those companies are bad.

why do you say that?

It's bad if the facetime and asskissing come at the expense of productivity and money making. Money making being the only reason to be a business. Now if the asskissing and facetime somehow turn into moneymaking, good for them, but I personally want no part of it, because fark asskissing and feelings in business.TwistedFark: s.

Maybe the rest of you are farking angels, but it if was me I would be collecting the sweet Yahoo! paycheck and then either playing FTL all day or working on my web strip poker start up. I'm pretty certain that I'm in the majority with this self assessment.

In my experience, it's 50/50. I put in a lot of hours at home, explicitly because I loathe a standard job where I have to deal with people face to face and deal with office politics. I work harder at home so I'm WAY covered in people knowing I'm more productive than if I were on-site. That said, I know guys who do shiat-all working from home but still collect the paycheck.

This is sort of my point. Even Branson who came out slamming Yahoo! for this move was very careful to caveat it with the fact that you need to have the proper tools and "communication" in place, basically - check ups on the employees, built into your program.

He's right (of course he's right, he's Richard Branson I guess).

I reckon Yahoo! is probably just like a million other companies out there and has problems forming cohesive strategies to measure their productivity and because of that can't accurately put in controls to make sure that people aren't gaming them for a paycheck and then farking off.

I'll be really brutally honest here - I don't consider myself an bad person, but if I did WFH regularl ...


That wasn;t to say I'm not stoned off my ass 24/7, cause I am, but i couldn't get away with that at work, even with my work quality. Being freelance helps, as I'm often the only person working on whatever it is I'm working on, so if I let them think it takes X hours while it takes less than X hours, but I still have it to them in X, or a little under hours? Everyone's happy.
 
2013-02-26 08:17:29 AM  
Working from home means they will eventually realize that someone else can do it cheaper overseas.
 
2013-02-26 08:18:43 AM  
Another thing that I found and that many of my friends found from working from home was that their jobs really didn't take as long as they have to at the office.  If you can finish your weekly work in 18 hours instead of 40, you'd be an idiot to spend all 40 hours diligently by your phone and logged into the server making up work for yourself.   I can think of many, many reasons why work takes longer at the office - morale and stretching work to fit the hours being just two of the big ones.  Maybe Yahoo could take a hard look at their work loads and do some swapping around.
 
2013-02-26 08:18:59 AM  

timujin: I find I do much better when working from home.  I often find myself working longer hours as well.


This.  I'm much more willing to go that extra mile when I'm working from home.
 
2013-02-26 08:20:12 AM  

sendtodave: sethen320: Slaxl: I like working from home because in quiet moments I can play games. There, I said the truth. You all do it too. If not - I apologise for apparently ruining it for the rest of you :(

I once took a support call from personnel several hundred miles away while playing xbox.

I kept it on mute the whole time so nobody knew. The questions were simple enough that I never had to pause.

We used to take support calls in the middle of Halo LAN parties at work.

Stuff like that is why I didn't burn out and quit (which would, of course, force them to get a new hire and train them).

I saved them money by playing games at work.  The horror.


We used to play a lot of Scorch 3D over the network. The turn-based aspect makes it much more conducive to our office.
 
2013-02-26 08:27:25 AM  
Depends what your job is.  Also depends on whether you can get anything done that way.
 
2013-02-26 08:27:56 AM  

Twilight Farkle: or she drank a little too much of Google's cultural kool-aid and has gone full-retard against remote work.


Yyyyyup.  This is definitely a Google policy.  Google discourages working from home because they believe that innovation comes when its employees are interacting and letting ideas bounce off of one another.  So really, those annoying conversations and human interactions that the work-at-home set are avoiding are actually what Yahoo is trying to foster.
 
2013-02-26 08:27:59 AM  
I work in an office but have the option to work from home under certain circumstances. If I'm too sick or if the plumber is coming by, etc...  Just those instances where it is better if I work from home. Even once when the power went out at the office, stayed home and worked effectively.

I agree with a lot of the other folk in here, I can be much more productive when my office mates aren't badgering me for the answers to all of their questions, constantly. In fact, I've learned that they eventually figure stuff out on their own by way of necessity when I'm not there to hold their hand through it. So, even in that respect its a good thing.

I wish I could do it more though. That and our office is about to move 25 miles away sometime this year and I just moved within 1 mile of it less than 4 months ago.

*sigh
 
2013-02-26 08:30:03 AM  
All I can really do is laugh.  Buncha folks lying about their jerbs.  Must be a fark thread.  These same folks will claim to bike to work everyday in bike threads.  It is funny how many Fortune 50 CEOs hang out at fark.
 
2013-02-26 08:33:24 AM  
I work from home. My boss works from home. Over half of the people in this company work from home, including the CEO. (25 person company)

Before starting here I met with the CEO. I told him I was dubious about the productivity of people (including me) working from home. He told me that he'd rather spend his money on getting the best people who really cared about the work they were doing than spend it on office space.

It's working amazingly well so far. I can't believe how well we all communicate, get things done, and feel like a team.  I'm getting more done at this job than any job previously. I'm learning more from my superiors than I ever did in any job before this. I think this is because our communications have laser focus on the task at hand--there's no bullshiatting about what happened on the weekend, no drama, no dicking around on a 2 hour lunch, just a bunch of people who are focused on moving fast and getting shiat done. We all get together once a month or so for a day or two, which I think is also a great way to work. Basically I can leave those 2 day meetings and have a pretty good idea of everything I need to deliver before the next meeting.
 
2013-02-26 08:37:24 AM  

kimmygibblershomework: All I can really do is laugh.  Buncha folks lying about their jerbs.  Must be a fark thread.  These same folks will claim to bike to work everyday in bike threads.  It is funny how many Fortune 50 CEOs hang out at fark.


You sound like you work at McDonalds.

/of course I want fries with that
 
2013-02-26 08:38:07 AM  

shut_it_down: Twilight Farkle: or she drank a little too much of Google's cultural kool-aid and has gone full-retard against remote work.

Yyyyyup.  This is definitely a Google policy.  Google discourages working from home because they believe that innovation comes when its employees are interacting and letting ideas bounce off of one another.  So really, those annoying conversations and human interactions that the work-at-home set are avoiding are actually what Yahoo is trying to foster.


No dog in this hunt, but if the office isn't chock full of dullards the conversations might not be so inane.
 
2013-02-26 08:40:05 AM  

mrlewish: Working from home means they will eventually realize that someone else can do it cheaper overseas.


They've tried that up here with IT jobs.  It had disastrous results for them.  Half the employees let go went to work for consulting firms, billing $200 an hour to do their old jobs, and the other half worked as contractors, making 50% more than they used to.

After losing untold millions, the bigger companies are moving all the IT operations back in house.
 
2013-02-26 08:44:46 AM  
Of course a Fark thread is going to be skewed on this subject though. It's basically entirely made of people who have the time and freedom to fark from work.
 
2013-02-26 09:00:14 AM  
I've been working from home coming up on 7 years now. I'm far more productive than my coworkers. Though, one is incompetent and the other is just lazy, so I'd be more productive regardless of where I was working from. I don't slack off... at least not any more than I would if I was going into the office anyway. There are some weeks, regardless of whether you're in an office or at home, where you just don't have the motivation to get much done.

I've found though that keeping a regular work routine helps. I'm always at my computer at 8am, and here until at least 5pm. The people I've met who have trouble working from home usually aren't working until 10am or later, and are never available until the end of the day. They view working from home as essentially a day off. If you start out with that mentality, you'll end up never getting anything done.

It helps that I work with multiple different clients, so I've got lots of conference calls and project plans to keep up with.
 
2013-02-26 09:00:16 AM  

Molavian: mrlewish: Working from home means they will eventually realize that someone else can do it cheaper overseas.

They've tried that up here with IT jobs.  It had disastrous results for them.  Half the employees let go went to work for consulting firms, billing $200 an hour to do their old jobs, and the other half worked as contractors, making 50% more than they used to.

After losing untold millions, the bigger companies are moving all the IT operations back in house.


Not all - just the parts that actually matter. I have quite a bit of experience in this working at a bigger bank that does a lot of outsourcing and has recently moved to a shared services model for their business group (a project that I actually ran in my current capacity in IT).

Basically it's like this - Some things are a commodity. Servers. Routers. Disk space. Virtualization. Password resets. Telco and the like. You can outsource them because they are commodities, they are not differentiators for your business.

Other things however can matter quite a bit, for instance Service Desk can really matter because it's the biggest frustration for business customers and running an inhouse service desk, even if it's a level 2 one, can be a huge boon to front line or corporate staff.

Apps also matter - so doing some component of app development/support internally can be a key differentiator for a business (at my company one of my teams does our salesforce crm development inhouse, it's a small team but it means we can make lightning quick changes to the CRM platform to suit the business - other stuff we just buy off the shelf and support the configuration, which implies of course supporting and mapping the business processes to it.)

Really, an effective IT strategy will rely upon some principles of enterprise architecture to map that IT value back to business processes and you'll figure out what parts to keep inhouse and outsource the rest. We've learned this, which is why a lot of stuff is coming back after the initial blush of outsourcing to drive down costs.
 
2013-02-26 09:13:17 AM  
I'm more productive at home because I don't feel the need to spread out projects over hours/days/weeks to fill time. When I first started my job I did everything right away, only to realize that the one-hour project I was given would often be my only project for the entire week, but of course I'd have to sit at my desk and look busy for the other 39 hours. Now I do my projects in 5 minute increments with an hour of refreshing the same websites over and over inbetween.
 
2013-02-26 09:14:59 AM  
Wait until Yahoo gets the bill for all the chairs they suddenly need.

GO HOME AND PAY FOR YOUR OWN SPACE, YOU FARKERS
 
2013-02-26 09:19:34 AM  
Working from home is definitely a wonderful experience, especially when one is self-employed. Though at times it can be very difficult (for me) not to get distracted and goof-off for the day, that's why I don't mind going to the 'office' daily. Of course having a small company makes spending the day in the office very bearable. I had previously had a cubicle job for 8 years...I'll live in the woods in a refrigerator box before going back to cubicle world.
 
2013-02-26 09:32:09 AM  
I find that working from home has its pros and cons.

Cons:
It's not as easy to communicate with my teammates
If I run out of individual tasks, it's frustrating to be chained to my VPN connection to let my manager know I'm still around
I find it much harder to transition into 'home' mode at the end of the workday
I get bored and don't care about work

Pros:
GAS MONEY
Wasted energy on driving frustration
Ability to cook during my lunch hour

Otherwise I actually like work and having a social atmosphere in which to do so, though a day here and there to stay home is nice.
 
2013-02-26 09:34:40 AM  
Can we put an end to the myth that telecommuters are "pajama-clad employees working from the comfort of their own living rooms"? When I work from home, I am dressed, sometimes casually, sometimes in a dress shirt just because I feel like it, in a spare bedroom that is my office. I have more space and privacy than in my cube, am more productive because I am not BSing with co-workers about nothing important, and am saving $$$ by not commuting.

Of course, my work is basically solitary and my company has many offices, so even when I am physically in my office I can be in a meeting with people in several different offices and time zones (working from home also lets me take early meetings with London or late meetings with Asia). All that said, when I need to lock myself in a conference room at the office with co-workers, I do go in to do that too (there are home based employees who love those type of days as it gives them an excuse to come in and socialize). I don't need to be physically in every day.

Also, telecommuting is awesome on a day like today when I am home with a sick child. My work still gets done and everything stays on track (speaking of tracks, it is also great to go to the Y during my "lunch" hour). I don't know if I'd want to be a full time home based employee, but is awesome part-time (or, in my case,  most of the time).
 
kab
2013-02-26 09:37:46 AM  
Future of a large chunk of IT work, plain and simple.

A smart company knows that they're no longer on the hook for the cost of having a cubicle for an employee (building space, lights, insurance, etc), outside the requirements to hold occasional meetings.

The employee saves on gas money, and in many situations quality of life will go up, as well as make the employee more inclined to work more.  Everyone wins.

Slaxl: I like working from home because in quiet moments I can play games. There, I said the truth. You all do it too. If not - I apologise for apparently ruining it for the rest of you :(


I have great for you: an office environment doesn't deter this either.
 
2013-02-26 09:39:20 AM  

Sir Not Sure The Unscannable: I find it much harder to transition into 'home' mode at the end of the workday


What I find helps with this is that I do not sit at my desk for any reason after I am done working. I try not to go in the home office at all, but if I do I'm not sitting at my desk.
 
kab
2013-02-26 09:40:40 AM  

damageddude: Can we put an end to the myth that telecommuters are "pajama-clad employees working from the comfort of their own living rooms"?


*looks down*

No.

Oh wait, I'm not in my living room, so there's that.
 
2013-02-26 09:41:21 AM  
Back in the day when IBM started work from home positions in the late 90s, my boss casually mentioned that he thought it would probably have a shelf life of 10 years or so. Looking at how it has been used since then, I'm realy surprised it has lasted as long as it has in most corporations. Corporations really like control, and they have to trust their employees in this case, which is usually a no-no. I see the number of corps providing this benefit will probably stay the same at this point and not increase too much in the future. It's difficult to break old habits.
 
2013-02-26 09:45:03 AM  
As long as a person gets their work done and responds to their e-mails and calls I could give fark-all where they are physically located.

/csb

Currently we work from home 1 day a week, but the company doesn't want to pay for the building anymore so when our lease is up in June we are going 5 days a week from home.
 
2013-02-26 09:47:24 AM  
I worked at home for 3 years, and I was more productive then than any time working at an office.
 
2013-02-26 09:50:40 AM  
In healthcare, there are a bunch of jobs that can't WFH, but there are a few, so I have been in places where it was acceptable to ask for it as a job perk.  The only blowback I ever got was from others not able to work anywhere but in the lab, operatory, etc.  My bosses would compare our work loads, and productivity, and deal with the complainers.

My husband, OTH, is a natural cubicle dweller.  He's been a free-lancer in the past and realized that he needs the interaction and feedback that drives me nuts.

As for Yahoo, the ones that are best suited WFH will probably head for greener pastures, while the slackers from home may bring their best efforts.  But, I'd put money on them bringing their bad habits as well.  This will probably be yet another misstep for Yahoo.
 
2013-02-26 10:08:58 AM  
It really depends what you are doing and the culture of the company.  My team has a whole is more productive when in the office.  They back each other up, they collaborate, and shiat gets done.  Most people don't realize how important the social aspect is and that sitting in ones home removes that variable.

/also if the company doesn't have a 'work from home' culture - you're basically screwed
 
2013-02-26 10:09:41 AM  

kab: Future of a large chunk of IT work, plain and simple.

A smart company knows that they're no longer on the hook for the cost of having a cubicle for an employee (building space, lights, insurance, etc), outside the requirements to hold occasional meetings.

The employee saves on gas money, and in many situations quality of life will go up, as well as make the employee more inclined to work more.  Everyone wins.


Except the manager who has to account for hours worked.  If my butt wasn't in that seat over there, how does he know whether I was "on duty" full time?  Much easier to require the commute.
 
2013-02-26 10:24:50 AM  
I work from home because I mostly work freelance. I dislike the whole "office" thing for the most part and am far more productive working from my home in my opinion. I've been doing it a long time though, so I'm used to keeping myself on task and not letting myself get distracted. I also tend to work more hours in a day than I would if I was working from an office. When I work in an office I generally have the feeling of wanting to be out of the office and am looking to get out of the office as soon as possible. Working from home I'm just focused on the job at hand and aren't worrying about "getting out of there".

I also have a webcam handy for video calls and use skype as well to get in touch with people when I need to collaborate with them.
 
2013-02-26 10:49:50 AM  

JohnnyC: When I work in an office I generally have the feeling of wanting to be out of the office and am looking to get out of the office as soon as possible.


Hate people, huh?
 
2013-02-26 11:29:02 AM  
I worked from home during Hurricane Sandy when it was literally impossible to get from Brooklyn to the offices in Midtown.

I felt more productive than usual during that event, but that may have been in part due to the novelty of it, and to the adrenaline kick of having to figure out clever ways to get things done without the usual infrastructure available.

As a manager I do like to have my team gathered in the same physical location, at least occasionally.  It's so much more efficient for two people to work through an issue by sitting next to each other and talking than it is to discuss over IM or especially email.  And the more people involved, the greater the benefit there is.

I'd be thrilled with a work schedule where employees would work from the office three days a week and two from home, or vice versa.  Yes, some folks with insufficient self-motivation would spend their home days slacking... but would catch up during their office days, so it should all balance out by the end of the week.
 
2013-02-26 12:04:46 PM  
I've said it before and I'll say it again, only Renzelmann and Maxon coming out of retirement could create hope that Meyer can be stopped.
 
2013-02-26 12:11:42 PM  

Twilight Farkle: Dear Princess Marissa,

I'd be the first to say that Yahoo! needs to be refactored from the ground up, and I'd be the first to acknowledge that physical presence helps when it comes to cross-fertilization of ideas, but are you really that interested in facetime, or are you interested in cutting headcount without having to actually use the word "layoff"?

By the way, princess, your predecessors should have sold to MSFT years ago when he had the chance. Seriously, YHOO. MSFT bid $31/share for you dumb farks in 2008, except that your board had its head up its ass like a multibillion-dollar Ouroborous and let it fall through.

Whatever the fark was wrong with you then is what the fark is still wrong with you now. You're not in business for the sake of remaining independent, you're in business to make money for the shareholders. The employees got farked either way, the least you could have done is admitted defeat and become one with the borg when you had the chance. At least someone would have made money over the past five years.

Wow. That escalated quickly. I'm just glad that I neither work for now own shares in YHOO, or it probably would have been worse. I'm OK with a little bit of facetime every now and then even in the context of a distributed team, but I don't know what's the more frightening implication: either Princess Marissa is trying to disguise layoffs/constructive dismissals as something other than what they are, or she drank a little too much of Google's cultural kool-aid and has gone full-retard against remote work.

Your grateful bystander,
Twilight Farkle.


Dear Mr Balmer,

You're one to talk.

-Queen Melissa
PS:  Team Edward all the way.
 
2013-02-26 12:25:02 PM  

Sir Not Sure The Unscannable: Hate people, huh?


No... I like people alright... I dislike florescent lighting, crappy desks/chairs, cubicles, and dress codes... you know... typical office crap.
 
2013-02-26 12:25:55 PM  
What exactly is the work of a Yahoo programmer?  Seriously, what are they doing over there?  Seems to me that their problems are more related to a crisis of identity than where people work.  Perhaps Marissa thinks that bringing everyone into the office will help them finally figure that out and then better hone what their product should be?  Good luck with that.  Punishing the whole workforce for the results of bad product management sounds like a great way to turn your ship around and around and around and around...
 
2013-02-26 12:52:11 PM  
Here is a blog post I recently read on this subject.  Here is the key point to me: Flexibility is required of the No-Hour Workweek. Stein understands the unavoidable variances in life, and realizes that the traditional roles of the workweek should be dissolved to maximize productivity and happiness.

Apparently, my personal life is now considered an unavoidable variance.  Some people have attacked gay marriage as a threat to "traditional family values", which is stupid on its face, but the actual attack is by employers who want you working and connected 24/7.  If you are wrapped up in your job 24/7, then how exactly are you valuing your family?
 
2013-02-26 01:05:10 PM  
Working from home means one thing to me: Not sitting in farking Seattle traffic for 2 to 3 hours per day! I would shoot myself before ever accepting that lifestyle. FARK traffic.
 
2013-02-26 01:08:59 PM  
As someone writing "WAH" (working at home) on the in/out board on my way out of the office today, I'm getting a kick out of this thread.  I appreciate the fact that I can work in comfort at home tomorrow rather than deal with the hell that is going to be tomorrow's commute given the rain/snow mix we are expecting overnight.

As a consultant, I'm not the least bit tempted to screw the pooch when working at home, since I have to account for my hours somehow.  I save myself between 90 minutes and 2 hours by not having to commute.  I can make calls using my computer (with or without video, I prefer without).  I don't mind coming to the office (though I begrudge the fact that I have to work at this office when there is one closer one to my home), but I do enjoy being able to look at the weather and decide I'm not going to risk the drive, or line up some appointments or whatever and fit in work around them, etc.

/best of both worlds: I can work at home pretty much when I want but I don't really want to all the time
//I think someone slipped me the corporate coolaid
 
2013-02-26 01:28:20 PM  
I always preferred working in the office. I refuse to subsidize a corporation. By working at home, I'm having to heat my house, power the computers, shovel out some square footage in the place to set up a workspace, and have no dividing line between my sanctuary time and my work time. People think nothing of calling you from a different time zone. I'd rather have it go to voicemail at 2AM than have my phone jangle me awake.

I was in a group of about 10 people. Two of us showed up in the office every day. The other guy stayed in his office with the door shut and the lights out. (He worked by the glowing screen - I thought that was odd.) Users would come by asking for help. For them to come down in person meant they were really under the gun and needed help fast. They were always grateful to see me because they could not find the people who normally handled those requests. My coworkers who telecommuted used a lot of that time to do personal errands, shuttle kids around, or be in transit. They were not particularly good about letting people know ahead of time. One coworker I had would work from home and every time I called her, her kids would be in some pitched battle in the background. At her salary level, she could afford daycare.

I can see the Yahoo exec's point. I suspect there was a lot of abuse of telecommuting, which is pretty much human nature. As for complaining about wasting time in the office, it's pretty easy to shut down a motormouth. Just text another coworker to call you on the phone and tell the gabby person, you have a call to deal with that's very important.
 
2013-02-26 01:39:47 PM  
I personally like a mix of WFH and office. I think that it it great to be at the office to bounce a couple ways of tackling an issue with other developers and learn about what is going on with the team etc . But when I want to get coding it really does work well at home. Put on some loud music and just hammer out the code without interruptions is so pleasant,

I did read a quite negative report on energy usage patterns in US about working from home. It basically claimed we would use more energy staying at home vs  commuting and all working in a office building. I can't imagine that been true for me (30 miles south of San Francisco) IMO.
 
2013-02-26 02:15:47 PM  

mrlewish: Working from home means they will eventually realize that someone else can do it cheaper overseas.


You realize that you are basically admitting that you have nothing to offer for sale except your misery? If you are doing a job so menial that it can be replaced by a foreign worker, you have not positioned yourself well for the realities of the 21st century workplace.

You should see to that before it's too late.
 
2013-02-26 02:19:58 PM  
I for one applaud the idea.

And I've worked from home since '98.

The real issue is that Yahoo has a ton of deadweight.  People scattered anywhere, mismanaged, and not working together

How do you fix that?

You can fire everyone.    Or, you can shake their cage, make them come in.   People that are biatchy about it ?  fark them, it's a job dammit get to work.   You're lucky the place isn't folded and you all are unemployed.

Give them six months, see what changes.   Then call her crazy if it didn't change the downward spiral.

Bunch of pansy ass whiners 'what about my children boo hoo'.   Hire someone to care for your kid if you can't.
 
2013-02-26 02:50:06 PM  
My only complaints with working from home are that you become "institutionalized" like the Shawshank Redemption.    I worked for a shiatty company way longer than I should have simply because I was afraid of ever going back to a cubicle farm with a new employer.    Also, said company tended to over-look the stay at homers when it came time for raises/promotions because of an "out of sight, out of mind" mentality.
 
2013-02-26 02:58:26 PM  
To be fair though, the USPTO is a fairly unique situation that's inapplicable to most businesses, except maybe law firms.

We don't interact with a customer except rarely, and then it's during scheduled times/locations.
Every employee has an independent workload and their own docket.
Every employee can pretty much perform their job completely independently of any other employee.
Every employee has an exact production expectation that converts Hours Worked to Expected Production Units; every employee also has a measured Produced Units generated from work they actually produce.
Every employee has a production report generated every 2 weeks that compares their Produced Units to their Expected Production to make sure you're not falling behind (really, it's to remind you how far you are behind).

The motivating factor to ensure you're producing what's expected: if you under produce for 3 straight quarters, then you're fired.
 
2013-02-26 03:26:54 PM  
Contents Under Pressure: ***snip***

We have a team of 7, 3 in office, 4 at home.  The 3 of us are the only ones who ever get interrupted when a question comes in on the general line, even if the call is a question that should be answered by one of the other 4.  That system was annoying, but somewhat understandable, until a month ago, when we switched to a new phone system that allows you to ping outside numbers, just like you can interoffice.  Now, I don't even give the person a halfhearted answer, I just say "Person who works outside of the office needs to handle that."
 
2013-02-26 03:26:56 PM  

Prank Call of Cthulhu: [media.npr.org image 462x346]
Marissa Mayer is kinda hot. Obviously a shiatty CEO, though.



i bet her curtains match her carpet too.
 
2013-02-26 03:29:10 PM  

rev. dave: There are personality types who can get more done when they are not being interrupted constantly.  I am one of those people.   Just 2 days a week where I do not have people constantly dropping by my desk, interns and new employees asking questions etc...  I save the tedious work for WFH days.   Since I am in the Atlanta area, driving to work and back can take 3-4 hours out of each day and I see it as a waste of gas and energy.   To go through all that trouble so a manager can walk by once or 2x a week is foolish and stupid.  We save team meetings for a day once a week when everyone is in the office rather than have them every day.

Letting me work from home is like giving me money without a raise and making me work in the office costs me extra money and makes me want to leave the company to go work for someone who will treat me better.    You can only treat mature adults like children if they are stuck and cannot leave their jobs, but beware that the resentment you cause will reflect on the company.


lol   yea, Atlanta is a bit behind on their road construction schedule.  but they claim to be a 'modern american city'.
 
2013-02-26 03:33:14 PM  
one huge advantage to working from home is that you can gallop the mule without coworkers gawking or complaining to the brass.

as for the ladies, they can tickle their tacos without stirring up the guys.


its a win win for everyone, including your one eyed trouser snake.
 
2013-02-26 03:39:28 PM  

Magnanimous_J: mrlewish: Working from home means they will eventually realize that someone else can do it cheaper overseas.

You realize that you are basically admitting that you have nothing to offer for sale except your misery? If you are doing a job so menial that it can be replaced by a foreign worker, you have not positioned yourself well for the realities of the 21st century workplace.

You should see to that before it's too late.


or he could be right.   any company's largest expense is labor so unless you can sh*t tiffany cufflinks, neither you nor anyone else is safe.  the more folks companies have to choose from, the more average YOU become.

them folks overseas be smart too.

why do they do it?   cause the Owner (stockholders) wants more and more money.  and they will never get enough either.
 
2013-02-26 04:34:24 PM  
working from home, would not have it any other way...fellow WAHs...you know what I'm talking about
 
2013-02-26 06:41:10 PM  

MacEnvy: I'm WAY more productive at home because people aren't stopping by to bother me all day. I save up my drudge work for my telework day each week because I know I can really get some shiat done.

If people are obviously abusing the privilege, you have 3 options: warn them, rescind telework for them, or fire them. The same as if they were unproductive while in the office. This is not a difficult proposition.


Same here.  I was extremely productive when I worked from home, but I was always very productive when I went in.  I think some of these productivity issues are a problem with the employee and not the telecommuting, but there are those that want to say telecommuting is the cause.  Bring those people into the office and they will probably loaf there as well.
 
2013-02-26 07:06:21 PM  
I'm shocked to find that biggest "pro" to working at home among farkers is the lack of the whole "human interaction" element.

Shocked.
 
2013-02-26 07:40:39 PM  

robohobo: Jon iz teh kewl: robohobo: sendtodave: Productivity:  Is it the end-all measurement of worth, or will future companies value more important things?  Depends on who you work for, I guess.

Lots of companies value bs facetime/asskissing more than being productive. Those companies are bad.

why do you say that?

It's bad if the facetime and asskissing come at the expense of productivity and money making. Money making being the only reason to be a business. Now if the asskissing and facetime somehow turn into moneymaking, good for them, but I personally want no part of it, because fark asskissing and feelings in business.TwistedFark: s.

Maybe the rest of you are farking angels, but it if was me I would be collecting the sweet Yahoo! paycheck and then either playing FTL all day or working on my web strip poker start up. I'm pretty certain that I'm in the majority with this self assessment.

In my experience, it's 50/50. I put in a lot of hours at home, explicitly because I loathe a standard job where I have to deal with people face to face and deal with office politics. I work harder at home so I'm WAY covered in people knowing I'm more productive than if I were on-site. That said, I know guys who do shiat-all working from home but still collect the paycheck.


no.  the only reason to get a job is to get money.  you don't work "so the company gets money".  you get money so YOU get money.

(i'm part of the people that spells J.O.B. whenever discussing jobs)
 
2013-02-26 10:03:10 PM  

Magnanimous_J: mrlewish: Working from home means they will eventually realize that someone else can do it cheaper overseas.

You realize that you are basically admitting that you have nothing to offer for sale except your misery? If you are doing a job so menial that it can be replaced by a foreign worker, you have not positioned yourself well for the realities of the 21st century workplace.

You should see to that before it's too late.


Ah the old menial repetitive labor argument.

Do you think that foreign workers are only good for menial labor? Are they less intelligent or something?

They are just a capable as we are but work for less and as soon as you realize that jobs where you don't have to actually be in an office/factory to actually produce goods can be done just as effectively in china, India, Vietnam, Indonesia, Kenya, Brazil, Peru etc. for a lot less then you can here.
 
2013-02-26 11:09:06 PM  
No doubt you'll still be working from home all the friggin time, you'll just also be expected to come sit in the office 9-6.
 
2013-02-26 11:28:30 PM  
I tried WFH a few times.  My problems with it is my boss expected 24/7 availability then.  Heck No! I am in the office between 8 am to 5 pm M-F.  It doesn't matter if I am WFH or in the office those are my work hours.

IF you allow me a semi-flexible work week (core hours/flex time elsewhere) I'll consider different work hours.  CALLING me at 7 pm on a Saturday and then getting pissed when I didn't respond immediately  is not acceptable.  Bad manager = bad WFH experiences
/when I physically am in the office he has no problems with my work schedule
 
2013-02-26 11:50:01 PM  

robohobo: sendtodave: robohobo: sendtodave: Productivity:  Is it the end-all measurement of worth, or will future companies value more important things?  Depends on who you work for, I guess.

Lots of companies value bs facetime/asskissing more than being productive. Those companies are bad.

http://groups.csail.mit.edu/mac/users/rauch/worktime/

An average worker needs to work a mere 11 hours per week to produce as much as one working 40 hours per week in 1950

Even since 1975, supposedly an era of low productivity growth and stagnation in living standards, officially measured productivity has increased almost 70%. The average worker would therefore need to work only 23 hours per week to produce as much as one working as recently as 1975

And, if the productivity measures have any meaning, the average worker could have a 29-hour workweek if he were satisfied with producing as much as a 40-hour worker as recently as 1990.

I'm not sure, I don't think that's even counting automation.

We've productively eliminated much of our workforce.  Outsourced the rest.  And then we complain that they are leeches on society.

Anyway, we're productive enough. We need to focus less on productivity, and more on expanding the workforce, and worker well being.

Oh, wait, I almost forgot, quarterly profits are all that matter.

Why be in business if not to do nothing else but make money? It's not the business of making life nice or making better things.


FTFY.
 
2013-02-26 11:52:38 PM  

Magnanimous_J: mrlewish: Working from home means they will eventually realize that someone else can do it cheaper overseas.

You realize that you are basically admitting that you have nothing to offer for sale except your misery? If you are doing a job so menial that it can be replaced by a foreign worker, you have not positioned yourself well for the realities of the 21st century workplace.


Misery is a valued commodity in that 21st century workplace. If you disagree, ask around and see how many people you know would be allowed to keep their jobs without being miserable.
 
2013-02-26 11:54:13 PM  

davidphogan: Having worked from home, it was one of the greatest perks ever.


As someone who has, for over two years now, worked at home (and repeatedly rewarded for being an outstanding individual contributor), it's not just a perk, but a way of life.

The company for which I work is global, with locations in six different time zones. All of those locations have dev teams, and my job requires that I'm at least someone available to some or all of them, depending on the product's milestones and the overall schedule for the company. I'm also recovering from moderate agoraphobia, so having the ability to skip going into the office on bad days means that, instead of taking a day of sick time, I'm productive for at least 8-10, if not more, hours that day.

In return for that perk, I work my ass off. Telecommuters that "go dark" or treat "work at home" days as part-time or vacation time piss me off, because I often have to deal with the situations for which they're unavailable. It's especially piss-worthy if they're vendors, because they (or their agencies) are getting paid big bucks, and to watch them waste that money through mediocre output and unavailability is like a slap in the face.

Telecommuting is great, if you have the discipline and integrity to remain focused. Otherwise, don't do it - you're not just slacking, but screwing other folks while doing so. Eventually, you will either ruin it for everyone (like at Yahoo) or get your ass fired by a manager that pays attention.
 
2013-02-27 04:53:23 PM  

Twilight Farkle: Dear Princess Marissa,

I'd be the first to say that Yahoo! needs to be refactored from the ground up, and I'd be the first to acknowledge that physical presence helps when it comes to cross-fertilization of ideas, but are you really that interested in facetime, or are you interested in cutting headcount without having to actually use the word "layoff"?

By the way, princess, your predecessors should have sold to MSFT years ago when he had the chance. Seriously, YHOO. MSFT bid $31/share for you dumb farks in 2008, except that your board had its head up its ass like a multibillion-dollar Ouroborous and let it fall through.

Whatever the fark was wrong with you then is what the fark is still wrong with you now. You're not in business for the sake of remaining independent, you're in business to make money for the shareholders. The employees got farked either way, the least you could have done is admitted defeat and become one with the borg when you had the chance. At least someone would have made money over the past five years.

Wow. That escalated quickly. I'm just glad that I neither work for now own shares in YHOO, or it probably would have been worse. I'm OK with a little bit of facetime every now and then even in the context of a distributed team, but I don't know what's the more frightening implication: either Princess Marissa is trying to disguise layoffs/constructive dismissals as something other than what they are, or she drank a little too much of Google's cultural kool-aid and has gone full-retard against remote work.

Your grateful bystander,
Twilight Farkle.


I love you.
 
2013-02-27 11:30:12 PM  

ph0rk: shut_it_down: Twilight Farkle: or she drank a little too much of Google's cultural kool-aid and has gone full-retard against remote work.

Yyyyyup.  This is definitely a Google policy.  Google discourages working from home because they believe that innovation comes when its employees are interacting and letting ideas bounce off of one another.  So really, those annoying conversations and human interactions that the work-at-home set are avoiding are actually what Yahoo is trying to foster.

No dog in this hunt, but if the office isn't chock full of dullards the conversations might not be so inane.


A professor or scientist stopping by to ramble on about his latest research is no more interesting than weekend sports talk when you're on a roll with real work. Where I'm working right now, half of my coworkers are basically done with the day's work by 10 am and just twiddle thumbs until a fire comes up. A few can't be bothered to recognize when others are doing real work, but you can't piss them off when they have your back every time the shiat hits the fan. C'est la vie.
 
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