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(New York Daily News)   Bronx newborn hasn't slept through the night since she was born 18 months ago. Also meet her mom and dad, probably the world's strongest parents   (nydailynews.com) divider line 178
    More: Sappy, Weill Cornell Medical College, Bronx, Dr. Haviva Veler, sleep apnea, hyperactivity, night terrors, Haley Rivera  
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22042 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Feb 2013 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-25 06:28:39 PM
Pssh.  Whatever.

Light sleeper as a three point merit.
 
2013-02-25 06:30:07 PM

StaleCoffee: Yeah. That never ends well. It's kinda like the White Castle scenario. Every few months we try it because we don't remember how badly it ended, or figure THIS time it will work out. Then there's a few days of haunted faces, occasional hitching sobs and throbbing temple veins, and usually a new appliance or furniture purchase.

The problem is he gets bored and lonely and has some seriously bad ADD, which in our case translates to: consequences mean nothing. He can lose video games and TV for two weeks, then the day he gets them back lose it again for the same damn thing. Other behavioral training type approaches work much better but at 3 AM after being woken up every 20 minutes and not getting laid for a week because your 10 year old keeps farking knocking on the bedroom door, gentle and brilliant parenting is *really farking hard* to maintain and a GO THE fark BACK TO BED OR I WILL PILE YOUR WII GAMES ON THE GRILL AND COOK THEM FOR BREAKFAST RIGHT NOW can slip out.

Sticking to a rigid, consistent schedule is as much for our sanity as it his for his development.



I wonder if you're focused on the wrong part of the issue.  I imagine it's impossible to get a kid who is not sleepy to fall asleep, so I get why the punishments and whatnot fail.  Have you tried non drug methods of making him sleepy?  For instance, have you tried waking him up at 6AM and making sure he gets outside to play and whatnot?  And doing that for a few days in a row?  Not that I have anything against using drugs.  Just a thought.
 
2013-02-25 06:31:35 PM

skullkrusher: queezyweezel: lordargent: queezyweezel : Nyquil? What the hell is wrong with you? Benadryl is for babies. B. Baby

Nyquil is for newborns. N. Newborn.

I hope to God that nobody ever stumbles across this thread looking for child rearing advice.

Whiskey is for wee ones. W...


Codeine is for children.  C. Children
 
2013-02-25 06:36:43 PM

StaleCoffee: Mikey1969: Arthur Jumbles: Instead of having the kid sleep away from the parents in a crib have them sleep in the parent's bed.

That's how kids get smothered. They had a case here a few years back where daddy was a little tipsy, rolled over on the kid, and didn't wake up. Kid died and dad got some kind of jail sentence.

We set the crib up as a side car beside the bed so mom could roll over and nurse him without getting out of bed.


We had a little flat bottomed bassinette that fit right in between us. The sides were high enough to prevent us rolling over on them or accidental pillow smothering, but low enough that I never had to wake up much to scoop them out and stick them on the breast. It was the best of both worlds, and a godsend. Plus, being very small, it was self-limiting as to how long they could stay in it, and in our bed.
 
2013-02-25 06:37:24 PM

lennavan: StaleCoffee: Yeah. That never ends well. It's kinda like the White Castle scenario. Every few months we try it because we don't remember how badly it ended, or figure THIS time it will work out. Then there's a few days of haunted faces, occasional hitching sobs and throbbing temple veins, and usually a new appliance or furniture purchase.

The problem is he gets bored and lonely and has some seriously bad ADD, which in our case translates to: consequences mean nothing. He can lose video games and TV for two weeks, then the day he gets them back lose it again for the same damn thing. Other behavioral training type approaches work much better but at 3 AM after being woken up every 20 minutes and not getting laid for a week because your 10 year old keeps farking knocking on the bedroom door, gentle and brilliant parenting is *really farking hard* to maintain and a GO THE fark BACK TO BED OR I WILL PILE YOUR WII GAMES ON THE GRILL AND COOK THEM FOR BREAKFAST RIGHT NOW can slip out.

Sticking to a rigid, consistent schedule is as much for our sanity as it his for his development.

I wonder if you're focused on the wrong part of the issue.  I imagine it's impossible to get a kid who is not sleepy to fall asleep, so I get why the punishments and whatnot fail.  Have you tried non drug methods of making him sleepy?  For instance, have you tried waking him up at 6AM and making sure he gets outside to play and whatnot?  And doing that for a few days in a row?  Not that I have anything against using drugs.  Just a thought.


The reason we use the melatonin is because it works.

Yeah, he gets outside. He wakes up at 6 every day regardless of how much sleep he gets. We have not let it go longer than a week to see if he will crash on his own. Maybe that would work but it's not something I want to experiment with really.

He has neighborhood friends and rides his bike all the hell over, romps in the dirt and builds forts out of sticks and shiat in the wooded lot across the street - a lot of the stuff people gripe that kids don't do "these days" - I DO get pissed that the school tends to keep him inside during recess to sit and stare out the farking window because he didn't finish his work instead of letting him blow off some energy, but nothing I can do about that right now.

I grok the failure of punishments too, just, like I said. Hard to remember that at 3 AM when you're exhausted and frustrated. Honestly sometimes I feel like an asshole because I'll snap off "You just lost XYZ tomorrow" and then realize it doesn't farking matter and I shouldn't be doing that, but feel like I need to stick with it to be consistent.

It's also hard to keep straight because all this other shiat does work with our younger son, though he rarely needs it comparatively.
 
2013-02-25 06:37:52 PM

Lee451: The next night you can't get to sleep, think about this:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fatal_familial_insomnia


That...that is hell
 
2013-02-25 06:40:31 PM

SchadenFraud: skullkrusher: queezyweezel: lordargent: queezyweezel : Nyquil? What the hell is wrong with you? Benadryl is for babies. B. Baby

Nyquil is for newborns. N. Newborn.

I hope to God that nobody ever stumbles across this thread looking for child rearing advice.

Whiskey is for wee ones. W...

Codeine is for children.  C. Children


P is for Penis. For children.
 
2013-02-25 06:41:08 PM

jennyz: Veler suggested to Stella that she place many pacifiers around her daughter's crib, so that when Haley wakes up, she can more easily find the pacifier herself and learn to put herself back to sleep.

How the hell did they not figure that shiat out on their own??


Because, the woman giving the advice went to school for several years and she is a doctor. The parents simply created, gave birth to, and live with the child.
I wonder what the night in the clinic and that Dr's brilliant advice cost them.
 
2013-02-25 06:47:56 PM

LeroyBourne: I've never understood that, ok, we're gonna tape a bunch of shiat and tubes to your face, ok, niiiighty. I understand it serves a purpose, you'd just think they would somehow simplify it.


They're probably working on that, but it is fairly ridiculous. An in-home exam at least would be better.
 
2013-02-25 06:47:56 PM
Perhaps she's not yet old enough to articulate what's bothering her.

static4.businessinsider.com
 
2013-02-25 06:48:10 PM

StaleCoffee: Yeah, he gets outside. He wakes up at 6 every day regardless of how much sleep he gets. We have not let it go longer than a week to see if he will crash on his own. Maybe that would work but it's not something I want to experiment with really.



Yeah I don't see why not.  It's the same principle with young kids who "refuse" to eat vegetables.  Kids don't starve themselves to death rather than eat vegetables.  Anyway, I didn't mean to come across as attacking you.  Clearly if you're at the medication stage you've tried a ton of shiat.  I didn't mean to focus on the exercise thing but rather the waking up thing because no one is going to go to sleep at 3AM and wake up at 6AM and keep that up for long.  I only threw in the exercise thing because it's something I do myself but then I'm much older and whatnot.

StaleCoffee: I grok the failure of punishments too, just, like I said. Hard to remember that at 3 AM when you're exhausted and frustrated. Honestly sometimes I feel like an asshole because I'll snap off "You just lost XYZ tomorrow" and then realize it doesn't farking matter and I shouldn't be doing that, but feel like I need to stick with it to be consistent.



I know exactly how you feel.  =]  Don't beat yourself up too much.  When that happens to me, I usually make sure once the punishment is done I spend good quality time to make up for it (without saying I'm making up for it).
 
2013-02-25 06:48:43 PM

StaleCoffee: Mikey1969: Arthur Jumbles: Instead of having the kid sleep away from the parents in a crib have them sleep in the parent's bed.

That's how kids get smothered. They had a case here a few years back where daddy was a little tipsy, rolled over on the kid, and didn't wake up. Kid died and dad got some kind of jail sentence.

We set the crib up as a side car beside the bed so mom could roll over and nurse him without getting out of bed.


I've heard of setups like that. We let my baby actually sleep in the bed, but had a padded barrier around her that neither one of us would roll onto.


bump: Did I mention how he'd only sleep/nap when held in a vertical position.... and how I saw 'The Lion King' & 'Toy Story' over and over and over and over and over... again....

/...and over and over and...


My daughter gets leg cramps. Somehow these things are hereditary, I've had them my whole life, and they are agonizing  Totally intermittent, might get them every day for 2 weeks, and then not get them for a year. She gets the same thing, and will scream in pain for hours. Of all the movies that we have recorded for her on the DVR, the only one she'll calm down to for some reason is 'Igor'. We're to the point where we get her about 10% settled down, can put the movie on, and go back to sleep. The problem is that you never REALLY go all the way back to sleep. I have heard that movie in a semi-doze so many times, I can dream the damn thing with my eyes wide open. No other movie works, and we went through one of her periods last year where it was every 2-3 nights for a month...

Luckily, she's figured out to come in and have me rub them for a minute if they hurt even the slightest bit. Seems to do the trick. Of course, some times it's a delaying tactic at bed time.

/So sick of that farking movie...
//More sick of the leg cramps, both hers and mine.
 
2013-02-25 06:51:47 PM
Helllooooooooo Dr. Haviva!
 
2013-02-25 06:53:50 PM

namegoeshere: StaleCoffee: Mikey1969: Arthur Jumbles: Instead of having the kid sleep away from the parents in a crib have them sleep in the parent's bed.

That's how kids get smothered. They had a case here a few years back where daddy was a little tipsy, rolled over on the kid, and didn't wake up. Kid died and dad got some kind of jail sentence.

We set the crib up as a side car beside the bed so mom could roll over and nurse him without getting out of bed.

We had a little flat bottomed bassinette that fit right in between us. The sides were high enough to prevent us rolling over on them or accidental pillow smothering, but low enough that I never had to wake up much to scoop them out and stick them on the breast. It was the best of both worlds, and a godsend. Plus, being very small, it was self-limiting as to how long they could stay in it, and in our bed.


Yeah, we had something similar. Worked for all the same reasons, including protecting the baby.
 
2013-02-25 06:55:14 PM
Pussies.  My son didn't sleep more than 2-4 hours (3 average) at a stretch until he was about 2.5 years old.
 
2013-02-25 07:02:05 PM

Mikey1969: namegoeshere: StaleCoffee: Mikey1969: Arthur Jumbles: Instead of having the kid sleep away from the parents in a crib have them sleep in the parent's bed.

That's how kids get smothered. They had a case here a few years back where daddy was a little tipsy, rolled over on the kid, and didn't wake up. Kid died and dad got some kind of jail sentence.

We set the crib up as a side car beside the bed so mom could roll over and nurse him without getting out of bed.

We had a little flat bottomed bassinette that fit right in between us. The sides were high enough to prevent us rolling over on them or accidental pillow smothering, but low enough that I never had to wake up much to scoop them out and stick them on the breast. It was the best of both worlds, and a godsend. Plus, being very small, it was self-limiting as to how long they could stay in it, and in our bed.

Yeah, we had something similar. Worked for all the same reasons, including protecting the baby.


We got the Arm's Reach co-sleeper when my kid was about three months old and used it til we kicked him out at six months.
 
2013-02-25 07:03:20 PM

Zelron: Pussies.  My son didn't sleep more than 2-4 hours (3 average) at a stretch until he was about 2.5 years old.


And you didn't rush him to every specialist you could find daily so they could "treat" your snowflake?

Monster.
 
2013-02-25 07:03:47 PM

lennavan: StaleCoffee: Yeah, he gets outside. He wakes up at 6 every day regardless of how much sleep he gets. We have not let it go longer than a week to see if he will crash on his own. Maybe that would work but it's not something I want to experiment with really.

Yeah I don't see why not.  It's the same principle with young kids who "refuse" to eat vegetables.  Kids don't starve themselves to death rather than eat vegetables.  Anyway, I didn't mean to come across as attacking you.  Clearly if you're at the medication stage you've tried a ton of shiat.  I didn't mean to focus on the exercise thing but rather the waking up thing because no one is going to go to sleep at 3AM and wake up at 6AM and keep that up for long.  I only threw in the exercise thing because it's something I do myself but then I'm much older and whatnot.


I didn't think you were attacking me, sorry if I seemed terse there. I'm personally and intimately familiar with the exercise thing and I know it's a cardinal sin on fark to admit you go to the gym but several years back I decided my life sucked and I wasn't gonna win the lottery, so I quit drinking myself to sleep and started training MMA instead. Slept a whole lot better.

I get what you are saying and appreciate that you're trying to help, it's kind of impressive to see on fark. The problem is that he just slogs through the day miserably, or takes an hour to drag his dead ass out of bed for school when mom & dad have to get to work. During the summer its less pressure but the problem we run into is that just doesn't work. I wish it did. Like I said, we just thought we sucked as parents and didn't try hard enough until we had the second one and all this shiat either worked as suggested or just plain wasn't necessary.

Hell, our 6 year old will shout "WILL YOU SHUT UP I WANT TO GO TO SLEEP" sometimes. It's pretty funny but I have to remind myself that he learns that from me, which means I need to reign my shiat in more. Still, funny.

StaleCoffee: I grok the failure of punishments too, just, like I said. Hard to remember that at 3 AM when you're exhausted and frustrated. Honestly sometimes I feel like an asshole because I'll snap off "You just lost XYZ tomorrow" and then realize it doesn't farking matter and I shouldn't be doing that, but feel like I need to stick with it to be consistent.

I know exactly how you feel.  =]  Don't beat yourself up too much.  When that happens to me, I usually make sure once the punishment is done I spend good quality time to make up for it (without saying I'm making up for it).


Heh, thanks. Appreciate it.
 
2013-02-25 07:08:39 PM
My daughter had horrible acid reflux for the first four months. She would scream non stop from 5pm until 3 am, unless we took her for a car ride that occasionally would work. It took going to the hospital on one of these nights and finding a fantastic pediatric GI doctor there that got her properly medicated.  Now that she outgrew the reflux, she sleeps for 11 hours at night. (Oh yeah and her pediatrician said that it was just colic and she would outgrow it).
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-02-25 07:08:42 PM

queezyweezel: The My Little Pony Killer: namegoeshere: queezyweezel: brap: Well maybe if that baby hadn't done so much got damned COCAINE she wouldn't have a deviated septum.  Had a similar issue with brap jr. until we started bottle feeding him Nyquil.

Nyquil?  What the hell is wrong with you?  Benadryl is for babies.  B.  Baby.

Never EVER drug a baby to sleep with OTC medecines!

That's what whiskey is for.

I though the whiskey was for teething. Are you trying to say that gently shaking them to sleep is wrong?

Whiskey is for the babysitter.  You NEVER shake a toddler. you apply a good choke hold.


PFFFT. Amateurs. Try Thorazine for a good nights rest. That brat will sleep for about a week if your lucky.

/i keed i keed
 
2013-02-25 07:13:06 PM
My daughter did not sleep for more than a few hours at a time for the first two years. I truly thought I was going to die for awhile from lack of sleep and trying to work. She is 26 now (and a Farkette) but still does not sleep well - she will jabber and flop around all night.

I envy those parents whose kids actually sleep at night. It was a living hell for awhile.
 
2013-02-25 07:17:17 PM

Mikey1969: My daughter gets leg cramps. Somehow these things are hereditary, I've had them my whole life, and they are agonizing Totally intermittent, might get them every day for 2 weeks, and then not get them for a year. She gets the same thing, and will scream in pain for hours. Of all the movies that we have recorded for her on the DVR, the only one she'll calm down to for some reason is 'Igor'. We're to the point where we get her about 10% settled down, can put the movie on, and go back to sleep. The problem is that you never REALLY go all the way back to sleep. I have heard that movie in a semi-doze so many times, I can dream the damn thing with my eyes wide open. No other movie works, and we went through one of her periods last year where it was every 2-3 nights for a month...

Luckily, she's figured out to come in and have me rub them for a minute if they hurt even the slightest bit. Seems to do the trick. Of course, some times it's a delaying tactic at bed time.

/So sick of that farking movie...
//More sick of the leg cramps, both hers and mine.


Ah god I had the horrible leg cramps!  Agony, they were. I was old enough to deal with them on my own, which was good because at that time mom was not getting out of bed during the night even if there was a nuclear blast. Hot wet towels wrapped tightly around my legs, with dry ones over top, was my thing. (I did wonder why nobody asked about all the wet towels in the wash.) I didn't outgrow them until after college. My oldest seems to have missed them, but my nine year old is starting to get them. Poor baby! : (
 
2013-02-25 07:18:53 PM
Everyone in this thread needs to read Go The F*ck to Sleep.
 
gja [TotalFark]
2013-02-25 07:18:54 PM

Wild Eyed and Wicked: My daughter did not sleep for more than a few hours at a time for the first two years. I truly thought I was going to die for awhile from lack of sleep and trying to work. She is 26 now (and a Farkette) but still does not sleep well - she will jabber and flop around all night.

I envy those parents whose kids actually sleep at night. It was a living hell for awhile.


You should have a service give her wake-up calls every so often for, you know, just shiats-n-giggles.

/payback
//i keed
 
2013-02-25 07:21:20 PM
My children perform in superior fashion when measured against the performance of your children
 
2013-02-25 07:25:07 PM
Put the brats crib on top of the dryer with a no heat cycle, or go for a night time cruise.....any ambient noise works.
 
2013-02-25 07:25:09 PM

gja: Wild Eyed and Wicked: My daughter did not sleep for more than a few hours at a time for the first two years. I truly thought I was going to die for awhile from lack of sleep and trying to work. She is 26 now (and a Farkette) but still does not sleep well - she will jabber and flop around all night.

I envy those parents whose kids actually sleep at night. It was a living hell for awhile.

You should have a service give her wake-up calls every so often for, you know, just shiats-n-giggles.

/payback
//i keed


Hmmmmm...Drew should bundle this service in for the $5. I would be all over that...
 
2013-02-25 07:25:38 PM
18 months = newborn?
 
2013-02-25 07:30:48 PM
Amateurs.  My son didn't sleep the entire night through for almost three years.  I remember getting up in 2 hour cycles for the first year and a half.  After that, we were guaranteed that he would be up and in bed, or crying, at least two or three times a night.

I clearly remember the first night he slept all the way through.  I got up at 5 or so, snapped awake, and ran to his room.  I was absolutely convinced he had died or something.  But there he was, sleeping peacefully.  Sure, for the next few months, he went back to getting up every night.

It was only after our daughter was born did we figure out what was going on: both of them were allergic to breast milk, although his allergy was far milder.  Essentially, he was lactose intolerant.

\watched a lot of professional wrestling and infomercials those few years
 
2013-02-25 07:39:51 PM
blatz514:
[www.nydailynews.com image 635x433]
Dr. Haviva Veler is the director of Weill Cornell's Pediatric Sleep Center and a pediatric pulmonologist at New York-Presbyterian's Komansky Center for Children's Health.

*shakes head*

 I read that as Valveeta.


Huh.  I read it as "Princess Vaginitis, Queen of Vulvania".  Aaaand my joke would be funnier if she actually was an OBGYN.
 
2013-02-25 07:43:23 PM
My son start sleeping from 10PM to 6AM when he was 6 weeks old.  He's a teenager now and will sleep for 15 hours straight.

I feel bad for the parents.
 
2013-02-25 07:46:44 PM

queezyweezel: The My Little Pony Killer: namegoeshere: queezyweezel: brap: Well maybe if that baby hadn't done so much got damned COCAINE she wouldn't have a deviated septum.  Had a similar issue with brap jr. until we started bottle feeding him Nyquil.

Nyquil?  What the hell is wrong with you?  Benadryl is for babies.  B.  Baby.

Never EVER drug a baby to sleep with OTC medecines!

That's what whiskey is for.

I though the whiskey was for teething. Are you trying to say that gently shaking them to sleep is wrong?

Whiskey is for the babysitter.  You NEVER shake a toddler. you apply a good choke hold.


Just use pillows to muffle any sound they make...

perhaps we shouls stop one-upping now. :p
 
2013-02-25 07:47:55 PM
skullkrusher:
That and a white noise machine worked wonders.

Both of our boys are woefully addicted to their white noise machines.  We may have doomed them to a life of that noise to be able to sleep, but they both sleep well.  I'll take it.
 
2013-02-25 07:52:44 PM
How could anyone sleep with all those tubes on their face.
 
2013-02-25 08:01:58 PM
Gotta love a good Fark Parenting thread.

EvilEgg: If you don't read the article, you think how does this make her different than many kids?  Then you read she had sleep apnea, which I guess is unusual for a newborn.


Actually, the article said that she had moderate apnea episodes, but the findings suggest that the cause of her inability to sleep through the night was non-medical.
 
2013-02-25 08:02:12 PM
I skimmed the article, but here's my CSB.

My son didn't sleep longer than 4 hours at a time until he was over three years old.

First it was just crying till he was about two, then it was night terrors at least twice a night every night.

Three years.  That sucked quite badly.  If my wife hadn't quit work to stay home with him I think I'd have legitimately gone batshiat crazy.  Every night, laying in bed, knowing that at some point my son would start screaming in terror at the top of his lungs taking a good half-hour to calm down and go back to sleep.
 
2013-02-25 08:04:17 PM

dgames: skullkrusher:
That and a white noise machine worked wonders.

Both of our boys are woefully addicted to their white noise machines.  We may have doomed them to a life of that noise to be able to sleep, but they both sleep well.  I'll take it.


I had a friend who couldn't sleep without a fan running in the room because he needed the noise. After he was married his wife forced him to sleep in a different room until he weaned himself off the crutch.
 
2013-02-25 08:05:21 PM

Atomic Spunk: If I were offered a cute woman's nipple to suck every time I woke up crying, I'd be waking up every 3 hours too.


Our almost-14-month-old is in total agreement with this.  My wife has just recently started thinking about not letting her nap as much during the day, or keeping her up later in the evening.
 
2013-02-25 08:07:15 PM

lostcat: I had a friend who couldn't sleep without a fan running in the room because he needed the noise.


This is my oldest. She must have a fan on her, even in January. I, OTOH, can't stand a fan directly on me during the night. Even if I am sweating balls.
 
2013-02-25 08:13:18 PM

keenerb: I skimmed the article, but here's my CSB.

My son didn't sleep longer than 4 hours at a time until he was over three years old.

First it was just crying till he was about two, then it was night terrors at least twice a night every night.

Three years.  That sucked quite badly.  If my wife hadn't quit work to stay home with him I think I'd have legitimately gone batshiat crazy.  Every night, laying in bed, knowing that at some point my son would start screaming in terror at the top of his lungs taking a good half-hour to calm down and go back to sleep.


That does sound sucky. My daughter is 2-1/2 and just learned the word "scary" in English a few weeks ago (she could say it in Japanese..."kowai"...for a few months before that). I was almost sad, because before she started using the word, she was pretty fearless -- running into a dark room without hesitating, for example.

Now when she finds something scary, she asks a bunch of questions about it. She found a small staute of Neil Armstrong in his spacesuit and kept asking "What's this?" This turned into a lesson on astronauts and a lot of time spent on YouTube watching Space Shuttle launches and old moon-landing footage. Now she frequently comes to me and says, "Daddy, astronaut go to moont," to verify that she's learned it correctly. She seems to have gotten over her fear of spacesuits (for the most part).

As far as I know, she hasn't had a nightmare that's woken her up screaming, although she tends to cry a lot when she wakes up because she wants to drink oppai (breast milk). But then, who doesn't wake up crying because they want a breast?
 
2013-02-25 08:20:17 PM

valar_morghulis: SchadenFraud: skullkrusher: queezyweezel: lordargent: queezyweezel : Nyquil? What the hell is wrong with you? Benadryl is for babies. B. Baby

Nyquil is for newborns. N. Newborn.

I hope to God that nobody ever stumbles across this thread looking for child rearing advice.

Whiskey is for wee ones. W...

Codeine is for children.  C. Children

P is for Penis. For children.


Heroin. H.

Wait what? Oh... oh...oh I see...

Norco is for newborns. N. newborns.

Ehhh....Whatever. W. Whiskey.
 
2013-02-25 08:23:00 PM
lh6.googleusercontent.com
 
2013-02-25 08:27:49 PM
She's not a newborn anymore, Subby.
 
2013-02-25 08:30:47 PM
Well this thread makes me never want to have kids.

just kidding. I have some friends with a one year old who has not been a good sleeper so far.. and until about 9 months she was super fussy. Other people say things about them like "They baby her too much." or "They are too high stress.", etc. etc. but honesty this couple does what they are supposed to do and has tried so many things. Some kids are just fussy.
 
2013-02-25 08:35:49 PM

Lucidz: Keep these threads coming.  It thrills me to no end that I've made the choice to be celibate so that I don't have to worry about any little demon-monsters running around the house.


Please tell us more about your "choice" to be celebate.
 
2013-02-25 08:47:55 PM

spidermilk: Well this thread makes me never want to have kids.

just kidding. I have some friends with a one year old who has not been a good sleeper so far.. and until about 9 months she was super fussy. Other people say things about them like "They baby her too much." or "They are too high stress.", etc. etc. but honesty this couple does what they are supposed to do and has tried so many things. Some kids are just fussy.


I never thought I wanted to have kids all through my 20s and most of my 30s. But I was never really against the idea. I figured I'd make a pretty good dad. Now that I have a kid I'm glad I did. My life seems a heck of a lot more full, and my daugther makes me happier than anything else.

Even from a selfish, calculating perspective, it's good to have kids. Otherwise you'd better make a crap-load of money so you can pay to have someone take care of you in your declining years.
 
2013-02-25 08:52:17 PM
My eldest (now 4) didn't sleep for the first few months unless she was held upright, in our arms. Every time we'd start to nod off or try to slip into a semi-reclining pose, she'd wake up screaming.   I'm convinced that sleep deprivation escalated my PPD.

The first time she slept through the night?  Christmas Eve.  Best present I've ever had.
 
2013-02-25 09:00:35 PM
Welcome to parenthood.
 
2013-02-25 09:01:56 PM

God Is My Co-Pirate: My eldest (now 4) didn't sleep for the first few months unless she was held upright, in our arms. Every time we'd start to nod off or try to slip into a semi-reclining pose, she'd wake up screaming.   I'm convinced that sleep deprivation escalated my PPD.

The first time she slept through the night?  Christmas Eve.  Best present I've ever had.


Beat Christmas present I ever got was an electric blanket.
 
2013-02-25 09:04:18 PM
My daughter didn't nap for the first 8 months of her life and still needed feeding every 3-4 hours at night. It was brutal. I really feel for these parents.

/The first night she slept through I panicked around 5 am until I saw she was breathing.
 
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