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(New York Daily News)   Bronx newborn hasn't slept through the night since she was born 18 months ago. Also meet her mom and dad, probably the world's strongest parents   (nydailynews.com) divider line 178
    More: Sappy, Weill Cornell Medical College, Bronx, Dr. Haviva Veler, sleep apnea, hyperactivity, night terrors, Haley Rivera  
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22042 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Feb 2013 at 5:00 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-25 05:37:47 PM

cgraves67: The Stealth Hippopotamus: Pity them.

Blame them, for it's a behavioral problem and behavior can, and should be modified by discrete parenting. The doctor even proscribed a behavior modification for treatment.

All too often behavior problems are either caused by the parents or not fixed because of a lack of resolve on the part of the parents.


All too often behavioral problems are automatically attributed with little evidence to problems with physiological causes because assuming is easier than finding the root problem. I'm not a sleep Dr, but I have my own sleep issues and am pretty well read when it comes to the medical literature and sleep.

Children with sleep breathing disorders often don't show overt results for sleep apnea. In fact, sleep apnea is a pointless distinction from sleep breathing disorders in general when it comes to the effects on sleep that can occur. Sleep apnea gets all the attention from drs because the stress it puts on the cardiovascular system can lead to death. More subtle forms of sleep breathing disorders, like upper airway resistance syndrome, can only be accurately  detected using esophageal pressure monitoring which is almost never used in a clinical setting. Measuring pulse transit times on a normal sleep study can also detect these issues, but you have to know exactly what your looking for.  It would be a god damn shame if this child and her parents have to go through needless suffering because the doctors were lazy and defaulted to victim blaming.

/I sound bitter
 
2013-02-25 05:38:52 PM
I did not sleep through the night for the first two years of my life. When I finally did, my mom woke up in the middle of the night anyway because she thought that I was dead.

So yeah...I try to get my mom a very nice Mother's Day present every year.
 
2013-02-25 05:40:36 PM

skullkrusher: busy chillin': skullkrusher: our baby sleeps 12 hours a night and has since he was about 5 weeks old. We have friends who have had the opposite experience. I don't know how the hell they do it

Lucky.

I have an 8 month that has only slept through the night about 3 times. He was getting better last week than got another tooth. And runny nose. Oh well...I always remind myself it could be much much worse. But yeah, I am ready for him to sleep through the night.

I swaddled the hell out of him for the first 5 months or so. That and a white noise machine worked wonders. Dunno how he'd be if I hadn't done that but it worked so I'm gonna do it again next time around. Teething is the worst though. He's pretty much done with that now but when he had one poking through I'd give him some children's tylenol before bed and that usually did the trick


we havea white noise machine and baby tylenol. we wrap him in a blanket, but he rolls and squirms and gets out.
 
2013-02-25 05:42:27 PM

MrPleasant: Huh....first kid would always wake up at least once during the night until he was about 2 years....maybe slept through the night once or twice.  Our 8 month old has maybe slept through twice so far.  Didn't know this was unusual...


This kid isn't "not sleeping through the night."  This kid is "not sleeping more than three hours at a time" and "getting six hours of sleep a day total."

/A misleading headline?  On Fark?  Crazy!
 
2013-02-25 05:42:36 PM

StaleCoffee: Our first son did that. For the first year of his life he didn't sleep more than 45 minutes at a time. The sleep deprivation was incredibly debilitating and painful. He didn't sleep through the night for the first time until he was 6 and we were dosing him with 9mg of melatonin per a neurologist. He still has sleep issues at age 10. He would stay up until 3 am reading if we let him, and sometimes we do just because we need to go to sleep without the argument, but he *needs* to sleep sometimes so just about every night is a battle.

Our younger son, age 6, will generally just drop off like a stone then roll out of bed in the morning without an issue.

It's hard not to sneer at parents who think their kids sleep great because they did something magical and amazing in the discipline department.  Sometimes this shiat is just something that people have to suffer through for years in order to get their kids safely to adulthood as capable, self sufficient human beings.


After reading the article I don't think that their child had anything similar to what you experienced. Otherwise the doctor would have given medical advice not pacifiers are great advice. One question though. Aren't pacifiers a no-no by a year and a half? My kids didn't have them after 1.
 
2013-02-25 05:42:53 PM

busy chillin': skullkrusher: busy chillin': skullkrusher: our baby sleeps 12 hours a night and has since he was about 5 weeks old. We have friends who have had the opposite experience. I don't know how the hell they do it

Lucky.

I have an 8 month that has only slept through the night about 3 times. He was getting better last week than got another tooth. And runny nose. Oh well...I always remind myself it could be much much worse. But yeah, I am ready for him to sleep through the night.

I swaddled the hell out of him for the first 5 months or so. That and a white noise machine worked wonders. Dunno how he'd be if I hadn't done that but it worked so I'm gonna do it again next time around. Teething is the worst though. He's pretty much done with that now but when he had one poking through I'd give him some children's tylenol before bed and that usually did the trick

we havea white noise machine and baby tylenol. we wrap him in a blanket, but he rolls and squirms and gets out.


http://www.diapers.com/p/summer-infant-kiddopotomus-swaddle-me-cotto n- knit-21429?site=CA&utm_source=Google&utm_medium=cpc_D&utm_term=PJ-078& utm_campaign=GooglePLA&CAWELAID=1338714279&utm_content=pla&ca_sku=PJ-0 78&ca_gpa=pla&ca_kw={keyword}

Velcro removes the possibility for parental swaddling issues :)
 
2013-02-25 05:43:13 PM
queezyweezel : Nyquil? What the hell is wrong with you? Benadryl is for babies. B. Baby

Nyquil is for newborns. N. Newborn.
 
2013-02-25 05:43:33 PM

Petey4335: Haley Rivera hasn't slept through the night since she was born 18 months ago.
Neither has her mom or dad.

Well that is bad parenting.  Coffee for one; tiny ear plugs for the other and switch every couple nights.


My daughter is almost 10 months, has only once slept through the night*, and is usually up 4+ times between 8 pm and 8 am.  She usually naps for 90 minutes in the morning (around 10 am), then about 30-60 (around 3 pm).  We have tried every suggestion short of providing her alcohol and letting her just cry until she passes out (she stands in her crib and cries longer than the 20 minutes our pediatrician recommended letting her go for).

The worst part is that, 9 of 10 times, when I go in to get her (and I have been since she was born) she just continues scream and cry until my wife comes and gets her.  She used to wake up, then could be put back down in a few minutes.  Her newest trick is to fall asleep while being held, then waking up as we are putting her into the crib, taking another 15 minutes to fall asleep, then repeating the process.  At this point we are completely out of options, and our doctor's response has been, "Yup, sometimes kids just don't sleep, sucks to be you and hopefully she grows out of it."

I would be grateful to be able to wake up and trade nights with my wife, but unfortunately, our daughter does not agree.  Also, drinking more than one cup of coffee a day is a no go for her as she is breastfeeding, not that she drinks coffee, but she will drink an occasional soda.

Last time there was a thread on baby sleep, I got several helpful suggestions from other Farkers, but not one worked.  At this point, TFA makes me wonder if I should demand a referral to get her sleep tested as her pediatrician has nothing helpful to offer.

*The day she was born, she slept for 23 out of her first 24 hours, even eating while asleep.
 
2013-02-25 05:45:22 PM
skullkrusher:

Velcro removes the possibility for parental swaddling issues :)

I think I still have one of those from my daughter. She didn't like it so we haven't used it with him. I might as well give it a try, though.
 
2013-02-25 05:45:23 PM
My son didn't sleep more than two hours at a time for the first 6 months of his life. Luckily, one night of cry-it-out training worked for him. Unluckily, I *still* can't sleep through the night, 9 months later. It's like my body is trained to wake up to his cries every few hours. Doubt I've gotten more than 3 or 4 hours in a row.
 
2013-02-25 05:46:26 PM

StaleCoffee: Our first son did that. For the first year of his life he didn't sleep more than 45 minutes at a time. The sleep deprivation was incredibly debilitating and painful. He didn't sleep through the night for the first time until he was 6 and we were dosing him with 9mg of melatonin per a neurologist. He still has sleep issues at age 10. He would stay up until 3 am reading if we let him, and sometimes we do just because we need to go to sleep without the argument, but he *needs* to sleep sometimes so just about every night is a battle.

Our younger son, age 6, will generally just drop off like a stone then roll out of bed in the morning without an issue.

It's hard not to sneer at parents who think their kids sleep great because they did something magical and amazing in the discipline department.  Sometimes this shiat is just something that people have to suffer through for years in order to get their kids safely to adulthood as capable, self sufficient human beings.


That describes our kid - 6 years old, will stay up till 2 am without his magical "night pop" - 3 mg or so of melatonin.  I think he slept through the night twice before he hit the age of 5.  He also sleep walks, so he'll wake up and will be in this bizarro dream state, with crazed eyes.  You can't talk to him or try to wake him when he's in that state or else he will start crying or thrashing and it won't stop.  He can go on a 1 hr crying binge while sleepwalking and you can't do anything about it.  When he was 3 he would sleep walk and you could hear him get up and start trying to unlock the front door.

Even worse, when he was 1-3 he had some kind of wicked allergy (we think) that caused him to wake up crying . . and then vomit if you didn't get to him in time.  So there was no "letting him cry it out".

Oh, and he learned how to climb out of his crib at 12 months.

After 6 years of sleep deprivation I've gotten used to it.  I rarely sleep more than 6 hours a night and I'm 100% used to leaping out of bed from deep, deep sleep for some kind of crazy sleep related emergency.

But most of the crazy stuff is past us . . except the sleepwalking thing and the need for melatonin.  We also have figured out certain routines that we can do to help him.

If there's one thing we've learned as parents its that some kids are different.  Oh, and parents who have lucked out with kids that have no sleep or behavior problems are smug a22holes.  It's always a kick when someone who has been telling you for years how their kid is perfect because of superior parenting skills goes and has a second or third kid who happens to have similar issues to ours. Their world is turned upside down and they quickly realized that they were just lucky the first time.
 
2013-02-25 05:47:29 PM

busy chillin': skullkrusher:

Velcro removes the possibility for parental swaddling issues :)

I think I still have one of those from my daughter. She didn't like it so we haven't used it with him. I might as well give it a try, though.


I couldn't swaddle for shiat and my wife was afraid to do it too tightly so we got those and I did the wrapping. Happy, sleepy little baby burrito
 
2013-02-25 05:47:59 PM
Neither of my kids slept longer than 2 or 3 hours for the first 14 months of their lives. It was horrible, but no one wrote an article about it. Shrug.
 
2013-02-25 05:48:43 PM
That toddler looks haunted. Most likely an evil spirit tormenting her every night. No worries.
 
2013-02-25 05:49:12 PM
brewthunda:
<i> If there's one thing we've learned as parents its that some kids are different.  Oh, and parents who have lucked out with kids that have no sleep or behavior problems are smug a22holes.  It's always a kick when someone who has been telling you for years how their kid is perfect because of superior parenting skills goes and has a second or third kid who happens to have similar issues to ours. Their world is turned upside down and they quickly realized that they were just lucky the first time. </i>

this. don't be smug assholes.


/why you no worky italics
 
2013-02-25 05:49:34 PM
I slept through the night from day one. My poor mom woke up the first morning home panicked that I was dead of SIDS.

Undfortunately, I was not so blessed with my own kids.
 
2013-02-25 05:49:48 PM
sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net
Is getting a kick out of this thread.....

encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
....not so much.
 
2013-02-25 05:50:38 PM
Instead of having the kid sleep away from the parents in a crib have them sleep in the parent's bed.
 
2013-02-25 05:50:57 PM

lordargent: queezyweezel : Nyquil? What the hell is wrong with you? Benadryl is for babies. B. Baby

Nyquil is for newborns. N. Newborn.


I hope to God that nobody ever stumbles across this thread looking for child rearing advice.
 
2013-02-25 05:51:01 PM
Really feel for these people.  One of ours arrived with a history of sleep issues, related to past trauma.  We spent the better part of the first year, sleeping in alternating short shifts, just so one of us would be semi-coherent.
 
2013-02-25 05:52:56 PM
Off topic from the article (but in line with the current conversation), the whole concept of "sleeping through the night" is utter bullshiat. You just don't know what flavor you are going to get when the kid is born. And even if they start to have a pattern of sleeping for more than 2 hours at a stretch, something can happen and that pattern is completely dashed overnight. Teething, the first cold, or, well, just because the kid doesn't feel like sleeping.

You pick your method, hope for the best, and change it up if it isn't working. Any parent who believes what they did made everything work is full of crap, they just got lucky that their kid was born a certain way.

Not trying to sound bitter, just tired of seeing parents who are smug about what they think they accomplished, or that "their way" is the superior way and everyone should do it.
 
2013-02-25 05:53:01 PM

busy chillin': skullkrusher: busy chillin': skullkrusher: ***snip***

we havea white noise machine and baby tylenol. we wrap him in a blanket, but he rolls and squirms and gets out.


We use a white noise machine every night and have used Tylenol and an antacid.  When she had a cold, we switched to baby Advil, but neither one has had a measurable improvement on her sleep.
 
2013-02-25 05:53:06 PM

Arthur Jumbles: Instead of having the kid sleep away from the parents in a crib have them sleep in the parent's bed.


I WISH I COULD REACH THROUGH MY MONITOR AND CHOKE YOU!!!!
 
2013-02-25 05:54:43 PM
Keep these threads coming.  It thrills me to no end that I've made the choice to be celibate so that I don't have to worry about any little demon-monsters running around the house.
 
2013-02-25 05:54:48 PM

Atomic Spunk: Arthur Jumbles: Instead of having the kid sleep away from the parents in a crib have them sleep in the parent's bed.

I WISH I COULD REACH THROUGH MY MONITOR AND CHOKE YOU!!!!


Yeah, that happened with our firstborn and he's still trying to sleep in our bed at 4 freakin years old......I TOLD YOU SO WOMAN!!!!

/Second stayed in her crib and now sleeps through the night.
 
2013-02-25 05:57:45 PM
As I read this headline I was wondering "How many posts will it take before someone blames the parents?"

Apparently the answer was 30.
 
2013-02-25 05:57:46 PM

queezyweezel: lordargent: queezyweezel : Nyquil? What the hell is wrong with you? Benadryl is for babies. B. Baby

Nyquil is for newborns. N. Newborn.

I hope to God that nobody ever stumbles across this thread looking for child rearing advice.


Whiskey is for wee ones. W...
 
2013-02-25 05:58:12 PM

Petey4335: Haley Rivera hasn't slept through the night since she was born 18 months ago.
Neither has her mom or dad.

Well that is bad parenting.  Coffee for one; tiny ear plugs for the other and switch every couple nights.


This.  Or instead of alternating every couple of nights, alternate every time Haley wakes up.  That gets each parent a solid 6 hours every night.
 
2013-02-25 05:58:25 PM
queezyweezel : I hope to God that nobody ever stumbles across this thread looking for child rearing advice.

Gin is for Girls
Burbon for Boys
Rum is for Mummy
Vodka is Yummy
 
2013-02-25 05:58:49 PM

queezyweezel: lordargent: queezyweezel : Nyquil? What the hell is wrong with you? Benadryl is for babies. B. Baby

Nyquil is for newborns. N. Newborn.

I hope to God that nobody ever stumbles across this thread looking for child rearing advice.


Wants to rear your child.

s3.amazonaws.com
 
2013-02-25 06:00:21 PM

lordargent: queezyweezel : I hope to God that nobody ever stumbles across this thread looking for child rearing advice.

Gin is for Girls
Burbon for Boys
Rum is for Mummy
Vodka is Yummy


Protip: If you're reading Fark for child-rearing advice you're going to wind up on the main page yourself.
 
2013-02-25 06:01:41 PM

StaleCoffee: Our first son did that. For the first year of his life he didn't sleep more than 45 minutes at a time. The sleep deprivation was incredibly debilitating and painful. He didn't sleep through the night for the first time until he was 6 and we were dosing him with 9mg of melatonin per a neurologist. He still has sleep issues at age 10. He would stay up until 3 am reading if we let him, and sometimes we do just because we need to go to sleep without the argument, but he *needs* to sleep sometimes so just about every night is a battle.

Our younger son, age 6, will generally just drop off like a stone then roll out of bed in the morning without an issue.

It's hard not to sneer at parents who think their kids sleep great because they did something magical and amazing in the discipline department.  Sometimes this shiat is just something that people have to suffer through for years in order to get their kids safely to adulthood as capable, self sufficient human beings.


Have you ever just let him stay up until he decided he was tired and went to bed on his own?  When I was younger (early teens) I did not get tired until 5-6am.  As an adult I don't generally go to sleep until 1-2 am (lay down at around midnight).  However, if I take a week off work and just stay up until I am tired and wake up in the "morning" I sleep more soundly but my clock ends up back around 5am through noon.
 
2013-02-25 06:02:15 PM

skullkrusher: our baby sleeps 12 hours a night and has since he was about 5 weeks old. We have friends who have had the opposite experience. I don't know how the hell they do it


We are at 14 months on #2.  Probably at about week 3 of sleeping through the night.  It's been a good 6 months of a single nightly feeding though so it's been manageable.

I hate you...
 
2013-02-25 06:03:46 PM

queezyweezel: Atomic Spunk: Arthur Jumbles: Instead of having the kid sleep away from the parents in a crib have them sleep in the parent's bed.

I WISH I COULD REACH THROUGH MY MONITOR AND CHOKE YOU!!!!

Yeah, that happened with our firstborn and he's still trying to sleep in our bed at 4 freakin years old......I TOLD YOU SO WOMAN!!!!

/Second stayed in her crib and now sleeps through the night.


Do you live in Milwaukee?
 
2013-02-25 06:04:35 PM
I was a colicky baby and didn't sleep through the night for the first year.  My father tells the story of how he saved my life one night.  He came home from work early one night (NY cop, worked midnight shift for a while) to find my mother up with me.  It was about 4am and I still hadn't slept.  Dad said she had a wild look in her eyes so he took me from her, sent her to bed, and took me to his parents' house for the rest of the day.  Years afterwards, he still looked back on that night and said he understood why parents sometimes drowned their kids.

Kudos to these parents for hanging in there for 18 months.  That can't be easy.
 
2013-02-25 06:06:29 PM
 
2013-02-25 06:08:07 PM

brigid_fitch: I was a colicky baby and didn't sleep through the night for the first year.  My father tells the story of how he saved my life one night.  He came home from work early one night (NY cop, worked midnight shift for a while) to find my mother up with me.  It was about 4am and I still hadn't slept.  Dad said she had a wild look in her eyes so he took me from her, sent her to bed, and took me to his parents' house for the rest of the day.  Years afterwards, he still looked back on that night and said he understood why parents sometimes drowned their kids.

Kudos to these parents for hanging in there for 18 months.  That can't be easy.


My parents said I was the same way.  My guess is baby #2 is payback for that.  Brutal first 8-10 months.
 
2013-02-25 06:08:39 PM

AgentBang: Off topic from the article (but in line with the current conversation), the whole concept of "sleeping through the night" is utter bullshiat. You just don't know what flavor you are going to get when the kid is born. And even if they start to have a pattern of sleeping for more than 2 hours at a stretch, something can happen and that pattern is completely dashed overnight. Teething, the first cold, or, well, just because the kid doesn't feel like sleeping.

You pick your method, hope for the best, and change it up if it isn't working. Any parent who believes what they did made everything work is full of crap, they just got lucky that their kid was born a certain way.

Not trying to sound bitter, just tired of seeing parents who are smug about what they think they accomplished, or that "their way" is the superior way and everyone should do it.


So the bolded part only works if the underlined part is true.  Not everyone mixes it up.  I have friends who picked their method - they don't want to let their baby cry himself to sleep.  So now at 16 months, the kid requires 45 minutes of rocking before he sleeps and he doesn't sleep through the night.
 So I get it, I have a lot of sympathy.  But only for the parents who legitimately gave a lot of different things a shot.
 
2013-02-25 06:10:32 PM

stappawho: skullkrusher: our baby sleeps 12 hours a night and has since he was about 5 weeks old. We have friends who have had the opposite experience. I don't know how the hell they do it

We are at 14 months on #2.  Probably at about week 3 of sleeping through the night.  It's been a good 6 months of a single nightly feeding though so it's been manageable.

I hate you...


hehe sorry. People who allegedly like me hate me because of my baby luck this time around. I basically followed The Happiest Baby on the Block from the beginning and it worked out great. Whether that was genetics or the advice actually works, I couldn't say.
 
2013-02-25 06:12:04 PM

mithras_angel: Isn't this how the plot of "The Ring" went?


It's the parents' fault for giving the kid a Ring of Sustenance.

/Well there's your problem!
 
2013-02-25 06:17:56 PM

Arthur Jumbles: Instead of having the kid sleep away from the parents in a crib have them sleep in the parent's bed.


That's how kids get smothered. They had a case here a few years back where daddy was a little tipsy, rolled over on the kid, and didn't wake up. Kid died and dad got some kind of jail sentence.
 
2013-02-25 06:20:36 PM

EvilEgg: If you don't read the article, you think how does this make her different than many kids?  Then you read she had sleep apnea, which I guess is unusual for a newborn.


Definitely considering:

Weill Cornell sleep center rules out potentially dangerous apnea 

Watubi: Lollipop165: The morning of my first day home (also as a Bronx newborn) my parents woke up at 8am in the morning and ran to my crib thinking I was dead. I was just sleeping. I never had a problem sleeping as a baby.

Still don't.

Most parents hardly get any sleep those first few nights home for fear of SIDS and making sure the baby is fed at proper intervals to regain birth weight.  Good to hear your parents didn't care about such matters and were able to sleep so soundly.


That was pretty damn funny.
 
2013-02-25 06:22:48 PM
Never hold a crying baby when you're standing at the top of the stairs.
 
2013-02-25 06:23:09 PM
About nine months into the first kid my birthday was coming around and my brother asked me what I wanted.

"A bottle of whiskey, some ear plugs, a hotel room and no one to come looking for me for twenty-four hours."
 
2013-02-25 06:24:10 PM

5monkeys: StaleCoffee: Our first son did that. For the first year of his life he didn't sleep more than 45 minutes at a time. The sleep deprivation was incredibly debilitating and painful. He didn't sleep through the night for the first time until he was 6 and we were dosing him with 9mg of melatonin per a neurologist. He still has sleep issues at age 10. He would stay up until 3 am reading if we let him, and sometimes we do just because we need to go to sleep without the argument, but he *needs* to sleep sometimes so just about every night is a battle.

Our younger son, age 6, will generally just drop off like a stone then roll out of bed in the morning without an issue.

It's hard not to sneer at parents who think their kids sleep great because they did something magical and amazing in the discipline department.  Sometimes this shiat is just something that people have to suffer through for years in order to get their kids safely to adulthood as capable, self sufficient human beings.

After reading the article I don't think that their child had anything similar to what you experienced. Otherwise the doctor would have given medical advice not pacifiers are great advice. One question though. Aren't pacifiers a no-no by a year and a half? My kids didn't have them after 1.


No idea. Our kids didn't like them for more than a few weeks top so we never really occupied brain space with that info. That space was prime real estate at that age.

brewthunda: But most of the crazy stuff is past us . . except the sleepwalking thing and the need for melatonin. We also have figured out certain routines that we can do to help him.


If he's anything like ours it just gets to be different issues, unfortunately. Regular sleep slowly becomes a reality though! Unfortunately ours still seems to need the melatonin, even with reading bedtime stories and rigid scheduling. Different measures for different kids.

Kazrath: Have you ever just let him stay up until he decided he was tired and went to bed on his own? When I was younger (early teens) I did not get tired until 5-6am. As an adult I don't generally go to sleep until 1-2 am (lay down at around midnight). However, if I take a week off work and just stay up until I am tired and wake up in the "morning" I sleep more soundly but my clock ends up back around 5am through noon.


Yeah. That never ends well. It's kinda like the White Castle scenario. Every few months we try it because we don't remember how badly it ended, or figure THIS time it will work out. Then there's a few days of haunted faces, occasional hitching sobs and throbbing temple veins, and usually a new appliance or furniture purchase.

The problem is he gets bored and lonely and has some seriously bad ADD, which in our case translates to: consequences mean nothing. He can lose video games and TV for two weeks, then the day he gets them back lose it again for the same damn thing. Other behavioral training type approaches work much better but at 3 AM after being woken up every 20 minutes and not getting laid for a week because your 10 year old keeps farking knocking on the bedroom door, gentle and brilliant parenting is *really farking hard* to maintain and a GO THE fark BACK TO BED OR I WILL PILE YOUR WII GAMES ON THE GRILL AND COOK THEM FOR BREAKFAST RIGHT NOW can slip out.

Sticking to a rigid, consistent schedule is as much for our sanity as it his for his development.
 
2013-02-25 06:24:26 PM
My first never made it past 2 hrs for sleeping. He had 24 ear infections in his first 22 months. He had a pediatrician practice with 5 rotating Drs - all who had multiple kids of their own - all said, "oh don't get tubes..." After aging over 10 years in those 22 months, he finally had tubes put in (took 8-10 minutes) and was fine since.

/parents - trust your gut.
 
2013-02-25 06:25:16 PM
"

 but indicated it may be a behavioral problem causing the sleeping problems "

"Mam, have a seat please.  I don't know how to break it to you but we've ruled out apnea and came to the conclusion your kid is just a jerk."
 
2013-02-25 06:25:35 PM

Mikey1969: Arthur Jumbles: Instead of having the kid sleep away from the parents in a crib have them sleep in the parent's bed.

That's how kids get smothered. They had a case here a few years back where daddy was a little tipsy, rolled over on the kid, and didn't wake up. Kid died and dad got some kind of jail sentence.


We set the crib up as a side car beside the bed so mom could roll over and nurse him without getting out of bed.
 
2013-02-25 06:26:17 PM
Did I mention how he'd only sleep/nap when held in a vertical position.... and how I saw 'The Lion King' & 'Toy Story' over and over and over and over and over... again....

/...and over and over and...
 
2013-02-25 06:26:22 PM

skullkrusher: stappawho: skullkrusher: our baby sleeps 12 hours a night and has since he was about 5 weeks old. We have friends who have had the opposite experience. I don't know how the hell they do it

We are at 14 months on #2.  Probably at about week 3 of sleeping through the night.  It's been a good 6 months of a single nightly feeding though so it's been manageable.

I hate you...

hehe sorry. People who allegedly like me hate me because of my baby luck this time around. I basically followed The Happiest Baby on the Block from the beginning and it worked out great. Whether that was genetics or the advice actually works, I couldn't say.


Probably a bit of both.  We followed that book too.

I have two kids and they have been very different at the various stages of growth.

Both are pretty well behaved all around which I'm sure has something to do with the way we have been raising them, but certainly not everything.
 
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