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(Boulder Daily Camera)   Only in America is there a movement for people to stop the clutter in their lives by getting rid of 10 things every day for a year   (dailycamera.com) divider line 71
    More: Interesting  
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7413 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Feb 2013 at 7:05 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-02-25 07:20:53 AM  
4 votes:
Its a symptom of being or growing up poor. You never know when an item might be useful so you tuck it away, hoping things will never get bad enough that you have to use it again.
2013-02-25 07:12:24 AM  
4 votes:
Moving once a year (on average) through my twenties already helped me out with this goal.
2013-02-25 09:00:43 AM  
3 votes:

justoneznot: Really Subby? Top 10 Ways To Effectively Clear Clutter from Lifehaker Australia.

Bonus: Top 5 Ways to a De-cluttered Kitchen from Times of India.


You beat me to it. I was going to point out anyone who has traveled extensively knows that America is definitely not the worst offender in this category.
2013-02-25 08:58:18 AM  
3 votes:

dragonchild: MayoSlather: Every move I find myself dumping more stuff.

I don't dump stuff; our weekly garbage pickup is one half-full 20-gallon bag.  But even after I bought a house I reflexively think, "If I own it, I'm gonna have to move it."

Nothing beats materialism out of you like having to move all the time and being too poor to hire movers.  For a good decade or so I had to make sure everything I owned fit in a 3-door Civic with enough room for, well, a driver.


Well I didn't mean garbage by using the word "dump". I sell it or give it to Goodwill.
2013-02-25 07:32:07 AM  
3 votes:
Getting married and having kids means you accumulate a LOT of stuff. My wife and I have been talking about doing something like this for a while.
2013-02-25 07:27:57 AM  
3 votes:
Really Subby? Top 10 Ways To Effectively Clear Clutter from Lifehaker Australia.

Bonus: Top 5 Ways to a De-cluttered Kitchen from Times of India.
2013-02-25 12:23:57 PM  
2 votes:
Everybody advocating "moving" as a way of decluttering is forgetting the massive industry of "rental storage".

Me: "We're really going to have to throw out a lot of this stuff".
Minister of Domestic Affairs: "No, we'll just put it in storage!"

Make it stop....

/I'm not entirely blameless here, having my own share of unnecessary clutter...
//I'm STILL trying to figure out how *I* ended up being "the neat one" (relatively speaking) in this relationship...
2013-02-25 12:00:57 PM  
2 votes:
Cable TV was the first on my list.  Not bragging, just realized it was the most wasteful thing I possessed so it was the start of my downsizing.

It's actually qute a liberating feeling getting rid of stuff- gone is the clutter and the attachment one gets to it.  When you possess it, you wonder how your gonna use it and worry about whether someone else will better benefit than yourself. Once its gone- you don't give it a second thought.

Next: anyone wanna buy a 1900sqft home in a nice neighborhood?
2013-02-25 11:36:31 AM  
2 votes:

czetie: Sometimes I wander around the house making mental lists of things I would sell, donate or toss if it were only my decision.

And sometimes I actually fantasize about a house fire. I would far rather have the insurance money and a fresh start than the current contents of my house.

Just me?


Eh, when my parents pass away, the only way I'll be able to deal with the house is to burn it to the ground.  I don't have it in me to go through 2,000 tons of crap.
2013-02-25 11:17:12 AM  
2 votes:
I just don't get this obsession with "decluttering". I am not a hoarder by any means, but I like my shiat and I am damn well going to keep it, all of it.
2013-02-25 10:16:39 AM  
2 votes:
Sometimes it's just thriftiness handed down by family members who survived the Great Depression and the second War to End All Wars. You can tell by the jars of bent nails.

www.rachelbishopdesigns.com

/Get a hammer and take the nails out of that board.
//We're straightening nails and organizing them by size today.
2013-02-25 09:46:19 AM  
2 votes:

chasd00: Getting married and having kids means you accumulate a LOT of stuff. My wife and I have been talking about doing something like this for a while.


Yeah, hubby and I did that recently with a LOT of his books. It makes the place a lot more "breathable"

/Horray for Half-priced Books!
2013-02-25 09:37:01 AM  
2 votes:

Bedstead Polisher: MayoSlather: My general rule is that if it's something that I haven't used in 6 months then I toss it.

I have a similar rule: if I forgot I even had it, why do I need it?
When I shop now, I ask myself: "Do I need it? Will I use it?" if the answer is no, I don't buy it. There are exceptions of course, but for the most part it saves me money.

I keep all of my clothes though because I gained weight and they MIGHT fit again someday. I only get rid of the stuff that looks old or is completely not in style anymore.


My wife and I have a similar rule.

We call it "The If You're Not Sure You Want It, You Don't Need To Buy It" rule.

If we "kinda like" something or "guess it will work" we leave it on the shelf. More money, less crap.
2013-02-25 09:30:11 AM  
2 votes:
The things you own wind up owning you.
2013-02-25 09:27:34 AM  
2 votes:

ZeroCorpse: This seems less like an effort to stop clutter, and more like an effort to publicize the release of an upcoming book about her experience.


I've found one simple truth about all of these internet "movements" (decluttering, fat acceptance, minimalism, "zen habits", "lifehacking", etc. etc.). Someone, somewhere is making money off of them. Not that that's necessarily "bad", but it does seem to make things a tad artificial.
2013-02-25 08:39:56 AM  
2 votes:
Try stop buying crap for a year.
2013-02-25 08:31:30 AM  
2 votes:
Move house.  I guarantee you the cost and effort of moving your crap will help you realize what you truly value.
2013-02-25 08:13:07 AM  
2 votes:

MayoSlather: Every move I find myself dumping more stuff.


I don't dump stuff; our weekly garbage pickup is one half-full 20-gallon bag.  But even after I bought a house I reflexively think, "If I own it, I'm gonna have to move it."

Nothing beats materialism out of you like having to move all the time and being too poor to hire movers.  For a good decade or so I had to make sure everything I owned fit in a 3-door Civic with enough room for, well, a driver.
2013-02-25 07:59:21 AM  
2 votes:

chasd00: Getting married and having kids means you accumulate a LOT of stuff. My wife and I have been talking about doing something like this for a while.


The rule at our house is that for every new toy that comes into the house, one little played with toy goes to charity. Our four year old even picks which ones that go.

Somehow we still have a house full of toys.
2013-02-25 07:49:12 AM  
2 votes:

chasd00: Getting married and having kids means you accumulate a LOT of stuff.


Yep. And then people start dying on you. I personally have three dead Grandmas worth of stuff in my attic. Need some dining room chairs? How 'bout a lamp? Some kitschy sofa art? I got lots!
2013-02-25 07:30:16 AM  
2 votes:
Anyone want a broken dishwasher and an old barely-functional red lawnmower? Things at my house tend to sit around for a year or so before I take a crack at fixing them. I have two other mowers, and hands to wash dishes with..
 "Growing up poor" means you fix things instead of buying new stuff when it breaks. I've fixed a TV and working on fixing a laptop (so many tiny screws).
2013-02-25 07:26:03 AM  
2 votes:

Jaws_Victim: Its a symptom of being or growing up poor. You never know when an item might be useful so you tuck it away, hoping things will never get bad enough that you have to use it again.


Or maybe they're poor because they spend all their money buying garbage they don't need.
2013-02-25 07:22:34 AM  
2 votes:
Rule of Thumb: Three house/apt moves = One house fire.
2013-02-26 06:47:14 AM  
1 votes:
"Have nothing in your houses that you do not know to be useful, or believe to be beautiful." -- William Morris
2013-02-26 05:21:26 AM  
1 votes:

Epicanis: Everybody advocating "moving" as a way of decluttering is forgetting the massive industry of "rental storage".

Me: "We're really going to have to throw out a lot of this stuff".
Minister of Domestic Affairs: "No, we'll just put it in storage!"

Make it stop....

/I'm not entirely blameless here, having my own share of unnecessary clutter...
//I'm STILL trying to figure out how *I* ended up being "the neat one" (relatively speaking) in this relationship...


If you choose to let something languish in storage for months after moving in, that's already a good indication that you do not truly value it.  Storage space costs money, and eventually you'll have to junk everything in there.
2013-02-26 03:26:35 AM  
1 votes:

dmax: What you buy are tools - things to help you in life. If your tools control you, you're doing it wrong.

Don't buy it if it won't help you in some way.


Going back to the camping gear, when Lordfortuna and I started car camping a couple of years ago, we only had a backpacking stove and it was pretty annoying. Turns out my dad had a second Coleman three-burner stove still in the box, which he and my mom had bought when they thought their other stove was dying... in 1987. Turned out it wasn't, fast forward to now and we have an awesome stove you can't even buy anymore, practically new.

If you have the space, obviously don't hoard to unhealthy levels, but there's nothing wrong with hanging on to something you will *probably* use eventually.

Dad also has a bunch of crap I'm quietly trying to encourage him to get rid of, but it's nowhere near as scary as the TV shows.
2013-02-26 01:16:20 AM  
1 votes:
What you buy are tools - things to help you in life. If your tools control you, you're doing it wrong.

Don't buy it if it won't help you in some way.
2013-02-25 09:35:08 PM  
1 votes:

spidermilk: My deal is that if I haven't used something in a year, I get rid of it. The only exception would be if it is a flashlight and the power hasn't gone out in a year or something similar. If it can be sold, I sell it and otherwise everything in decent shape goes to Goodwill.


Obviously you don't go camping or do much that requires expensive gear. Yeah maybe it doesn't get used that often, but it's still cheaper to own it than rent, especially if you do use it a couple times a year, but then maybe there's a bad year or two in terms of weather/time off...
2013-02-25 08:04:38 PM  
1 votes:

lack of warmth: Getting rid of 10 things a day fails if you acquire 12 or more things a day.


This.  And if you count each bills or junk mailing as a "thing"...
2013-02-25 05:59:14 PM  
1 votes:

Jument: Your wife sounds like she will one day be on Hoarders.


Sometimes I put that show on in the hope it will be a wake-up call. Mind you, she is not remotely dirty like many of the people you see on that show. Pick up the inch or so of paperwork covering every flat surface and you absolutely will not find plates, cutlery or pizza boxes. In fact, she's much better than I am about putting dirty dishes in the dishwasher.

That's us, basically. I'm neat but not very clean, she's clean but not very neat.
2013-02-25 05:17:26 PM  
1 votes:

Jaws_Victim: Its a symptom of being or growing up poor. You never know when an item might be useful so you tuck it away, hoping things will never get bad enough that you have to use it again.


Exactly. My whole family has a packrat problem, and its funny to see it manifest even in distant relatives. The core issue is for all of us, the biting poverty we experienced as kids. Some of the younger ones who benefited from later in life successes of their parents do not exhibit the tendency to the same degree.

I only managed to really break myself of this habit by essentially abandoning the contents of my apartment and moving 1200 miles away with only the belongings I could cram into my subcompact. Even then, the car was probably grossly overweight with items interlocked and occupying every inch of available space... It was like playing Tetris.

My father took pity on me and rescued my television and Xbox and a few other fairly valuable items when the job I pursued didn't pan out and I found myself without the means to pay the rent or even come back home. Once back on my feet, I was amazed at how clean and Spartan my new apartment was; Although I admit I am chagrined when I have to go buy new odds and ends like say an Ethernet or HDMI cable, or zip ties and batteries. Still, this way is better.

/The things you own end up owning you
2013-02-25 03:48:15 PM  
1 votes:
I need to weed out some books and probably a few games (I admit it, I'm a shamelessly addicted collector of media) but first I need to sell all the stuff that's in the ebay store. We didn't buy the house with the idea I'd be running a retail business out of it, which sucks. Our dining room hasn't been the same since that started...
2013-02-25 03:45:55 PM  
1 votes:
I started doing something similar 2 years ago, and was actually making headway when my wife's parents passed away within 4 months of each other.  Suddenly, all the nick-knacks and bric-a-brac that was in their house is now in OUR house, combined with what was there before.  Only recently has my garage gotten to the point where it is usable again.

/and don't ask D1vwife if she is really sure she needs to save 4 boxes of her mothers "Womens Day" magazines.  Too soon...
2013-02-25 02:18:41 PM  
1 votes:
I already do this at least twice a year, and good thing too, because I swear I have the packrat genes my paternal grandparents had.

I need to do it again too.
2013-02-25 02:05:27 PM  
1 votes:
We've had several housemates over the years and each one leaves crap behind when they move. We recently rented a dumpster (twice!) and threw out or Goodwilled all the accumulated crap in our house. It was awesome. Now to tackle the kid stuff.
2013-02-25 01:58:32 PM  
1 votes:

Duck_of_Doom: The Irresponsible Captain: Sometimes it's just thriftiness handed down by family members who survived the Great Depression and the second War to End All Wars. You can tell by the jars of bent nails.

This is true.  We moved about 8 years ago.  Had to clean out the equivalent of 2.5 houses (grandparents x2, deceased dad, our stuff).  My grandfather had his returned checks from paying his mortgage, 50 years ago.  He had boxes upon boxes of rubber bands that had dried up and disintegrated at the touch.  He had the house's original paneling, floorboards, siding from when he built the house.  My grandmother had fabric from who knows what era.  The point is, you never know when you will need it was their mentality.

The other side of this consumerism is disposable mentality.  You have something that you haven't used, so throw it out since it's clutter.  Then, when you do need it, buy a new one, and throw away the ones you don't need if it's in a multipack.  For instance, I recently received a car adapter for an mp3 player.  It came with an extra fuse.  I chucked it, since hey what do I need it for and it's just clutter.  Now, I need it.  I'm wasting money ordering what I should have kept.

There must be a happy medium between the two.


Organization goes a long way. No one would accuse Jamie Hyneman of being a hoarder, but he has amassed quite a bit of random stuff in bins. I'm not quite this organized myself, but I try to emulate it.

www.blogcdn.com
2013-02-25 01:39:42 PM  
1 votes:

Crackers Are a Family Food: But having been so poor, you want to just surround yourself with things so you feel that you're not quite so poor anymore.  Every time I clean out, I feel like I'm going one more step towards poverty.


I have that same mindset. I've found that buying one really quality thing instead of multiple pieces of crap tends to help. It's more expensive in the short term, but saves money (and clutter) in the long term. Easier said than done, of course.
2013-02-25 01:34:00 PM  
1 votes:
Was congratulating myself on finding the perfect balance of "I have stuff but not clutter" when I thought about the basement.  I feel a strong desire to go home and just pour a few loads of concrete down there and just start over again.

I like tidy, but I also have things that mean a lot to me.  But I haven't played that horn in 10 years, those two chairs my parents insisted on giving me are both hideous and uncomfortable, the contractors left 20 mostly empty cans of paint down there when they finished the renos, etc. etc.  The basement makes it very easy to keep the rest of the house quite neat yet still accumulate too much crap.

/not throwing out 10 items per day though
//anyone want two chairs that look like thrones and feel like iron maidens?
2013-02-25 01:03:31 PM  
1 votes:
My mothers family is a bunch of pack-rats.

My dad's isn't exactly minimalist, but they don't hold onto clutter.

I'm caught in the middle.  When I was a kid I had a rather small room.  My mother would guilt trip me over getting rid of toys I had outgrown if they were something particularly cool at one point.  She still occasionally guilt trips me over crap I got rid of in early grade school.

I struggled between mindsets.  What really helped?  First, when my ex-wife went nuts she stole everything of value I had, and being female of course the courts said that was okay.  Some of what she took I owned since the age of four.  Couple of years later, starting to own a few items again, Hurricane Ike took it all.

Whatever attachment to physical items I had is gone now.  My only real hoarding issues are computer parts, and media, and I'm working on that.  If the proposed laws to make it so DRM holders have to allow sales of digital items ever pass and it opens us a used market of digital media - so it actually costs less to go digital over physical, I'm going for it.  I currently have plans to go through all of my old hard drives, get what I need off of them and destroy/wipe them.  The out of date systems I have laying about should easily go with them since I can't see myself actually using the electricity to power them.
2013-02-25 12:30:24 PM  
1 votes:

The Irresponsible Captain: Sometimes it's just thriftiness handed down by family members who survived the Great Depression and the second War to End All Wars. You can tell by the jars of bent nails.

[www.rachelbishopdesigns.com image 321x214]

/Get a hammer and take the nails out of that board.
//We're straightening nails and organizing them by size today.


My husband's grandfather passed away in WW2. She raised her daughter by herself in post-war Philippines. She even became a nun as the Catholic church was really the only place she could turn to. I have a feeling that there were much darker times.  I can completely understand why she (and her daughter) are such hoarders. That doesn't make it healthy and calling it just "thriftiness" is not useful when you are trying to convince your MIL that 500 copies of Woman's Day Magazine from the early 90's is not worth saving.

Add on to that that they are addicted to shopping and you can imagine what its like.
2013-02-25 12:26:29 PM  
1 votes:

The Irresponsible Captain: Sometimes it's just thriftiness handed down by family members who survived the Great Depression and the second War to End All Wars. You can tell by the jars of bent nails.


This is true.  We moved about 8 years ago.  Had to clean out the equivalent of 2.5 houses (grandparents x2, deceased dad, our stuff).  My grandfather had his returned checks from paying his mortgage, 50 years ago.  He had boxes upon boxes of rubber bands that had dried up and disintegrated at the touch.  He had the house's original paneling, floorboards, siding from when he built the house.  My grandmother had fabric from who knows what era.  The point is, you never know when you will need it was their mentality.

The other side of this consumerism is disposable mentality.  You have something that you haven't used, so throw it out since it's clutter.  Then, when you do need it, buy a new one, and throw away the ones you don't need if it's in a multipack.  For instance, I recently received a car adapter for an mp3 player.  It came with an extra fuse.  I chucked it, since hey what do I need it for and it's just clutter.  Now, I need it.  I'm wasting money ordering what I should have kept.

There must be a happy medium between the two.
2013-02-25 12:26:12 PM  
1 votes:
I try my best to throw away things on a regular basis. I hate clutter.

My husband on the other hand.... well, his mother and grandmother are both hoarders. There's rooms that you can't walk into in his house. It's really sad. There's like 2 feet of walking space in his grandmother's room. I keep on asking him to clean up his childhood bedroom - there are a bazillion things in there (like stacks of video game magazines from 1995) but he for some reason won't do it. I think he thinks it will upset his family or something.
2013-02-25 12:17:01 PM  
1 votes:

SockMonkeyHolocaust: Eh, most of my stuff is now instruments/recording stuff, 30 boxes of books and my Epic 40K gaming stuff. Thanks to my Kindle I am getting rid of the books one by one and given how much money and time I sank into Epic 40k I am not getting rid of that stuff any time soon.



When is the last time you actually played Epic 40K? A friend of mine hasn't played in regular 40K 5 years, and his stuff is up on Ebay.
2013-02-25 11:34:21 AM  
1 votes:

Jaws_Victim: Its a symptom of being or growing up poor. You never know when an item might be useful so you tuck it away, hoping things will never get bad enough that you have to use it again.


Exactly.  My mom is a hoarder, and she grew up poor.  I also grew up poor, but having grown up in a hoarder's home, I do everything I can to not accumulate possessions.  But having been so poor, you want to just surround yourself with things so you feel that you're not quite so poor anymore.  Every time I clean out, I feel like I'm going one more step towards poverty.

Poverty will fark you up for life.  I've been through a lot and have been able to cope with everything except that.
2013-02-25 10:54:41 AM  
1 votes:
I went through some old tool bins, etc, in the basement a few weeks ago.

I started with four large bins (13 gallon?) and by the time I was done I had 1 bin.

The rest was in the garbage or garage sale pile.

It's surprising how much tubes old caulk I had in there.  (flame away...)
2013-02-25 10:54:37 AM  
1 votes:
One major solution to clutter: All-in-One Printer/Scanner.

Old documents?  Scan and Trash.
Old bills and receipts? Scan and Trash.

A single 4 GB USB drive or SD card can fit housefuls worth of paper.
2013-02-25 10:45:13 AM  
1 votes:
Every five years move out of your house, get rid of stuff that wouldn't make an actual move, clean the empty house, then move back in.
2013-02-25 10:26:23 AM  
1 votes:
B-i-L's brother is the opposite: Two kids by his first wife (who passed) remarried and now has two more kids by second wife.

Stuff belonging to the first kids gets tossed almost immediately - like Christmas presents he throws up after 3 months.
Kids have no toys and few clothes.

Yet the new set of kids have tons of stuff.

Yeah he's a Grade A farked up mess.
2013-02-25 09:55:53 AM  
1 votes:
Eh, most of my stuff is now instruments/recording stuff, 30 boxes of books and my Epic 40K gaming stuff. Thanks to my Kindle I am getting rid of the books one by one and given how much money and time I sank into Epic 40k I am not getting rid of that stuff any time soon.
2013-02-25 09:55:28 AM  
1 votes:
Sometimes I wander around the house making mental lists of things I would sell, donate or toss if it were only my decision.

And sometimes I actually fantasize about a house fire. I would far rather have the insurance money and a fresh start than the current contents of my house.

Just me?
2013-02-25 09:51:25 AM  
1 votes:

namegoeshere: Yep. And then people start dying on you. I personally have three dead Grandmas worth of stuff in my attic. Need some dining room chairs? How 'bout a lamp? Some kitschy sofa art? I got lots!


Oh God, yes. Wife's aunt died over three years ago. I wanted everything to go straight to Goodwill, untouched, but no: We had to schlep a van full of boxes back to our house, where they have been sitting ever since, waiting for that magical moment when my wife will go through them...
2013-02-25 09:47:54 AM  
1 votes:
My mom could do this every day for the rest of her life and probably still have a ton of crap left.  Pretty sure she is somewhere on the hoarder spectrum.
2013-02-25 09:45:30 AM  
1 votes:

Jaws_Victim: Its a symptom of being or growing up poor. You never know when an item might be useful so you tuck it away, hoping things will never get bad enough that you have to use it again.


Growing up poor brings it out in some people, for sure, but it's not the only cause. Some people just have a need for clutter the way some of us have a need for neatness (and/or a desire to not own more stuff than we can fit in the car).

My wife grew up comfortably middle class yet she can't let anything go: twenty year old street maps, ten year old Yellow Pages, hopelessly out of date guide books (and yes, she is thoroughly computer literate and knows she can Google this stuff). Her mail piles up, including the credit card offers and magazine subscription come-ons that I put straight into the recycling. She can clutter a hotel room within five minutes of arriving purely with the contents of her suitcase and the rack of brochures in the lobby. It's practically an art form.

One time I lost patience with a stack of file boxes cluttering up the hallway that we'd moved three times (including once transatlantic and once cross-country). Inside I found project files and time sheets from a job she hasn't had for over 10 years. When we moved out of her apartment in France, she had a couple of years' worth of International Herald Tribunes that she absolutely, definitely, certainly was going to get around to reading someday. Another box was full of 3.5" floppies filled with ancient backups, DOS programs, and a 1993 international flight schedule.

Like I say: some of us have an irrational need for neatness; and others have an irrational need for clutter.

/This is not a "wife joke", it's an observation about a person who happens to be my wife.
//The husband equivalent is the man who has a garage or basement full of broken junk that he really, definitely is going to fix one day.
2013-02-25 09:34:52 AM  
1 votes:
I have a bunch of stuff Im ready to toss Im just waitong for my development to bring the spring cleaning dumpster in. My roomate could really use this I swear the amount of crap she has tucked away is ridiculas and its not that she is a hoarder just lazy to throw stuff away/clean up.
2013-02-25 09:29:52 AM  
1 votes:

Bedstead Polisher: I keep all of my clothes though because I gained weight and they MIGHT fit again someday. I only get rid of the stuff that looks old or is completely not in style anymore.


Do this.  It's actually a great feeling when you give away the big clothes you used to need in favor of the old ones that fit you now.  I had a really nice suit I couldn't wear for years, but it fits perfectly now.
2013-02-25 09:26:37 AM  
1 votes:

dragonchild: MayoSlather: Every move I find myself dumping more stuff.

I don't dump stuff; our weekly garbage pickup is one half-full 20-gallon bag.  But even after I bought a house I reflexively think, "If I own it, I'm gonna have to move it."

Nothing beats materialism out of you like having to move all the time and being too poor to hire movers.  For a good decade or so I had to make sure everything I owned fit in a 3-door Civic with enough room for, well, a driver.


I'm trying to get to the point where the stuff I have is too BIG to move myself. Basically going from "cheap crap I drag around in my car" to "huge expensive pieces of furniture I pay other people to move". That's my goal. Weird, I know. :)
2013-02-25 09:24:38 AM  
1 votes:

chasd00: Getting married and having kids means you accumulate a LOT of stuff. My wife and I have been talking about doing something like this for a while.


God, yes. The kids thing especially. Today, right now, I have several plastic tubs full of farking paperwork on my desk that are about my kid. That doesn't even cover the crap (and broken crap) that leaves around the house like confetti.
2013-02-25 09:23:12 AM  
1 votes:
This seems less like an effort to stop clutter, and more like an effort to publicize the release of an upcoming book about her experience.
2013-02-25 09:13:03 AM  
1 votes:
I'm going to do this. I spend my weekends moving crap from one room in the house to another room. After about a month everything is back where it originally started, and the cycle begins again.
2013-02-25 09:09:57 AM  
1 votes:

MayoSlather: My general rule is that if it's something that I haven't used in 6 months then I toss it.


I have a similar rule: if I forgot I even had it, why do I need it?
When I shop now, I ask myself: "Do I need it? Will I use it?" if the answer is no, I don't buy it. There are exceptions of course, but for the most part it saves me money.

I keep all of my clothes though because I gained weight and they MIGHT fit again someday. I only get rid of the stuff that looks old or is completely not in style anymore.
2013-02-25 09:04:44 AM  
1 votes:
ppffft first world problems
2013-02-25 08:13:50 AM  
1 votes:

TravelingFreakshow: Am I in before the wife jokes?


Please show this to my wife (this is not a joke)
2013-02-25 07:48:21 AM  
1 votes:

NicoFinn: Two international moves in one year. I still have too many clothes.


I moved most of my stuff into storage a couple years ago when I moved abroad, only took a couple suitcases (not even filled to the max) and a backpack with me. I'm really amazed at how little I think "I wish I had..." Mostly just my bike. I think a lot of it will end up at Goodwill when I make it home.
2013-02-25 07:46:55 AM  
1 votes:

dragonchild: Moving once a year (on average) through my twenties already helped me out with this goal.


I've pretty followed this trend my entire adult life and you're exactly right. Every move I find myself dumping more stuff. It's amazing how little I actually use and how much of a consumer I've been most of my life buying things I don't need/use.

I recently just sold a box of childhood toys that I've been carrying around with me forever. It's pointless to have things that just sit in my closet untouched. My general rule is that if it's something that I haven't used in 6 months then I toss it. Exceptions go for things like tools, but otherwise do I really need to hang on to a pile of PC games that are over a decade old, or clothes I haven't worn in a year? Nope.
2013-02-25 07:26:25 AM  
1 votes:
Two international moves in one year. I still have too many clothes.
2013-02-25 07:22:30 AM  
1 votes:
Wow! I'd be a much more content human being (and the world a far better place) if I only had fewer possessions! Then I'd be, like, more spiritual than everyone else!

I'm getting on board with this one right now!!!!
2013-02-25 07:20:38 AM  
1 votes:
I'm in.
2013-02-25 07:19:17 AM  
1 votes:
I doubt I have 3,650 things in total, let alone that many things I should get rid of.
2013-02-25 07:11:46 AM  
1 votes:
Meth Heads already helped me out with this goal.
2013-02-25 07:06:52 AM  
1 votes:
Ten things? I think sun will stop burning before my closet is empty.
2013-02-25 07:06:42 AM  
1 votes:
the IRS already helped me out with this goal
 
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