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(The State)   Sure, other states don't want you spending food stamps on things like strippers and gambling, but only South Carolina thinks you're buying too much food with them   (thestate.com) divider line 163
    More: Dumbass, South Carolina, food stamps, Department of Social Services, Medical University of South Carolina, municipal governments  
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3597 clicks; posted to Politics » on 24 Feb 2013 at 1:47 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-24 07:48:14 AM  
Well, there is a difference between encouraging people to eat healthy, and mandating it..
 
2013-02-24 08:00:02 AM  

Alphax: Well, there is a difference between encouraging people to eat healthy, and mandating it..


I used to work at a convenience store, and people would come in all the time to buy 2 liters of Coke and potato chips with a food stamp card. I'm okay with saying that government money shouldn't go towards purchasing soda. It's pretty much the equivalent of letting people buy cigarettes with food stamp money.

It would be nice if they would simultaneously loosen the restrictions to allow toothbrushes, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, toilet paper, and laundry detergent though.
 
2013-02-24 08:09:25 AM  
If they were serious about helping poor families eat better, they could adopt something like the SNAP program in New Mexico where food stamps are matched $ for $ to double the amount clients can spend at farmers markets. It makes a huge difference to families and to farmers. Simply restricting what people can buy is just patronizing BS.
 
2013-02-24 08:44:15 AM  

Alphax: Well, there is a difference between encouraging people to eat healthy, and mandating it..



Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/2013/02/22/2642793/haley-says-sc-will-ask-for - food.html#.USoXoqXCZ8E#storylink=cpy

"That $1 billion no longer will go to candy and chocolate and sodas and chips," Haley said. "It'll be going to apples and oranges and things that are healthy."

So, let me get this straight...

It's OK that the government mandate that food stamps must be used to purchase "healthy foods", but it's *not* OK to mandate that our children eat healthy foods in public schools.
 
2013-02-24 08:45:56 AM  

ginandbacon: If they were serious about helping poor families eat better, they could adopt something like the SNAP program in New Mexico where food stamps are matched $ for $ to double the amount clients can spend at farmers markets. It makes a huge difference to families and to farmers. Simply restricting what people can buy is just patronizing BS.


What a great idea! Bravo New Mexico.
 
2013-02-24 09:16:03 AM  

ginandbacon: If they were serious about helping poor families eat better, they could adopt something like the SNAP program in New Mexico where food stamps are matched $ for $ to double the amount clients can spend at farmers markets. It makes a huge difference to families and to farmers. Simply restricting what people can buy is just patronizing BS.


I love farmer's markets. Mennonites grow the best freaking tomatoes ever. But farmer's markets don't reflect how poor people typically shop for food. They have very limited hours, the food is fresh and so it doesn't keep, you need transportation to get there and they aren't widely geographically distributed. They also tend to be skewed towards middle-class areas. Bloomington, IN has a farmer's market. Bedford, IN (a much, much poorer community) does not.. If Wal-Mart schedules you for the hours the farmer's market is open that week, what are you doing to do?

There are much better solutions out there than the current system. For example, the government could use its bulk purchasing power to get really good deals on staple foods and distribute those directly to poor people. But farmer's markets, while they are nice, aren't going to solve the problem.
 
2013-02-24 09:45:00 AM  

johnryan51: What a great idea! Bravo New Mexico.


Isn't it great? And it really helps the local growers.

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: But farmer's markets don't reflect how poor people typically shop for food. They have very limited hours, the food is fresh and so it doesn't keep, you need transportation to get there and they aren't widely geographically distributed.


Baltimore has been experimenting with added value in the Highlandtown market and John's Hopkins has been doing a long term public health survey to track the impact of the program. It's a poor neighborhood with a lot of Latino families and elderly who get I think $5 extra for every $20 they spend. There is also a farmers market food truck that brings the goods right to under-served neighborhoods. It's pretty cool and I know from talking to the farmers who sell there that it boosts their sales. You can also buy meat and eggs from one of the vendors. Really good organic free-range stuff. There have been studies done that show that when people have access to fresh produce, they buy more of it. (I'm sorry, I'm cooking brunch and don't feel like looking for the article I'm thinking of, but it's pretty solid research although I think it was done in Britain.)
 
2013-02-24 09:48:05 AM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: ginandbacon: If they were serious about helping poor families eat better, they could adopt something like the SNAP program in New Mexico where food stamps are matched $ for $ to double the amount clients can spend at farmers markets. It makes a huge difference to families and to farmers. Simply restricting what people can buy is just patronizing BS.

I love farmer's markets. Mennonites grow the best freaking tomatoes ever. But farmer's markets don't reflect how poor people typically shop for food. They have very limited hours, the food is fresh and so it doesn't keep, you need transportation to get there and they aren't widely geographically distributed. They also tend to be skewed towards middle-class areas. Bloomington, IN has a farmer's market. Bedford, IN (a much, much poorer community) does not.. If Wal-Mart schedules you for the hours the farmer's market is open that week, what are you doing to do?

There are much better solutions out there than the current system. For example, the government could use its bulk purchasing power to get really good deals on staple foods and distribute those directly to poor people. But farmer's markets, while they are nice, aren't going to solve the problem.


Well, it's also time consuming to prepare meals with fresh ingredients. I work one job - about 10 hours ago day. No children. I barely have time to do regular house maintenance, meal preparation, grocery shopping, budgeting, etc.

Add children, school work, nightly bathing routines for the family, and possibly a second job.
 
2013-02-24 10:00:02 AM  

Bontesla: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: ginandbacon: If they were serious about helping poor families eat better, they could adopt something like the SNAP program in New Mexico where food stamps are matched $ for $ to double the amount clients can spend at farmers markets. It makes a huge difference to families and to farmers. Simply restricting what people can buy is just patronizing BS.

I love farmer's markets. Mennonites grow the best freaking tomatoes ever. But farmer's markets don't reflect how poor people typically shop for food. They have very limited hours, the food is fresh and so it doesn't keep, you need transportation to get there and they aren't widely geographically distributed. They also tend to be skewed towards middle-class areas. Bloomington, IN has a farmer's market. Bedford, IN (a much, much poorer community) does not.. If Wal-Mart schedules you for the hours the farmer's market is open that week, what are you doing to do?

There are much better solutions out there than the current system. For example, the government could use its bulk purchasing power to get really good deals on staple foods and distribute those directly to poor people. But farmer's markets, while they are nice, aren't going to solve the problem.

Well, it's also time consuming to prepare meals with fresh ingredients. I work one job - about 10 hours ago day. No children. I barely have time to do regular house maintenance, meal preparation, grocery shopping, budgeting, etc.

Add children, school work, nightly bathing routines for the family, and possibly a second job.


Yeah and I'm not sure how many people even know how to cook anymore. Meal prep (planning, shopping, and cooking) takes up the bulk of my free time. We save a lot of money but it's a LOT of work.
 
2013-02-24 11:04:25 AM  

Alphax: Well, there is a difference between encouraging people to eat healthy, and mandating it..


Funny how when the First Lady even suggests improving nutrition it sends conservatives into a frothing rage

/but make it mandatory for poor people and you're golden
//assholes
 
2013-02-24 11:19:24 AM  
I can't even imagine what kind of stripper takes food stamps.
 
2013-02-24 11:25:57 AM  

Bontesla: Well, it's also time consuming to prepare meals with fresh ingredients. I work one job - about 10 hours ago day. No children. I barely have time to do regular house maintenance, meal preparation, grocery shopping, budgeting, etc.


The trick is to shop with meals in mind.  Buy a piece of meat, cut it up, put it into rations.  Or make a stew, portion it out, stick the portions in the freezer.  One could live very comfortably with 3 hours cooking time and $40 per week if they did this.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2013-02-24 11:47:04 AM  
The healthy food is the expensive food mostly.  Sausage is cheaper than ham or bacon because you can mix lots of fat and scraps in with the meat.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-02-24 11:50:21 AM  
Headline: only South Carolina

Article: At least 10 states or municipal governments have asked for waivers to the food stamp system in recent years.
 
2013-02-24 12:08:05 PM  
"That $1 billion no longer will go to candy and chocolate and sodas and chips," Haley said. "It'll be going to apples and oranges and things that are healthy."

Next right wing troll around here who goes on about Dems being Nanny Staters is gonna such a sock in the puss.
 
2013-02-24 12:10:35 PM  

johnryan51: ginandbacon: If they were serious about helping poor families eat better, they could adopt something like the SNAP program in New Mexico where food stamps are matched $ for $ to double the amount clients can spend at farmers markets. It makes a huge difference to families and to farmers. Simply restricting what people can buy is just patronizing BS.

What a great idea! Bravo New Mexico.


Agreed. I hadn't heard about that innovation yet. It makes sense on a couple of levels.
 
2013-02-24 12:36:04 PM  

Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: ginandbacon: If they were serious about helping poor families eat better, they could adopt something like the SNAP program in New Mexico where food stamps are matched $ for $ to double the amount clients can spend at farmers markets. It makes a huge difference to families and to farmers. Simply restricting what people can buy is just patronizing BS.

I love farmer's markets. Mennonites grow the best freaking tomatoes ever. But farmer's markets don't reflect how poor people typically shop for food. They have very limited hours, the food is fresh and so it doesn't keep, you need transportation to get there and they aren't widely geographically distributed. They also tend to be skewed towards middle-class areas. Bloomington, IN has a farmer's market. Bedford, IN (a much, much poorer community) does not.. If Wal-Mart schedules you for the hours the farmer's market is open that week, what are you doing to do?

There are much better solutions out there than the current system. For example, the government could use its bulk purchasing power to get really good deals on staple foods and distribute those directly to poor people. But farmer's markets, while they are nice, aren't going to solve the problem.


Toronto's Foodshare has a solution to that, they take a truck full of fresh veg to the "Food Deserts" it's a mini 'farmers market' that sometimes goes just from building to building giving access to the good veggies.  more here.
They are taking a multi-pronged approach from community gardens and grow-your-own to cooking classes to school meal programs and this program.  For fundraising they sell boxes of fresh produce that vary each month and include recipies for a few of the things in each box and now a cookbook.  Good all around.
 
2013-02-24 12:42:38 PM  
Forget the EBT cards and all that jazz.  Just send people checks that they can spend on whatever and be done with it already.
 
2013-02-24 12:44:24 PM  

thamike: Bontesla: Well, it's also time consuming to prepare meals with fresh ingredients. I work one job - about 10 hours ago day. No children. I barely have time to do regular house maintenance, meal preparation, grocery shopping, budgeting, etc.

The trick is to shop with meals in mind.  Buy a piece of meat, cut it up, put it into rations.  Or make a stew, portion it out, stick the portions in the freezer.  One could live very comfortably with 3 hours cooking time and $40 per week if they did this.


Three hours of cooking time a day is still way too much.  Three hours a week must be something you dreamed up.
 
2013-02-24 01:07:26 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: Three hours of cooking time a day is still way too much. Three hours a week must be something you dreamed up.


I'm talking about having food for one meal a day for a week.  Three hours a week was being realistic (but generous)  for a week long stew, pork shoulder, chili, etc.  Separating a flank steak and a few chicken breasts into daily rations, freezing them and throwing one ration in a pan for ten minutes with some onions and peppers, wrapping them in tortillas and eating whenever you're hungry is not something I dreamed up.  It's something I lived for five years, and I would hardly call it a struggle, let alone impossible.  And anybody who cooks for three hours a day should be charging money.
 
2013-02-24 01:13:10 PM  
I like how the Party of Small Government now believes it has a right to dictate what you're allowed to eat.
 
2013-02-24 01:29:48 PM  
"That $1 billion no longer will go to candy and chocolate and sodas and chips," Haley said. "It'll be going to apples and oranges and things that are healthy."

That's real specific. I like the farmer's market ideas upthread. KILL AGRICULTURE SUBSIDIES. And ban EBT use for white bread, white rice, and any of that other processed carborific crap (if the governor can be vague, so can I).

GAT_00: I like how the Party of Small Government now believes it has a right to dictate what you're allowed to eat.


In other news, it still astounds people that as a rule, government money comes with strings attached.
 
2013-02-24 01:34:45 PM  

Gulper Eel: In other news, it still astounds people that as a rule, government money comes with strings attached.


Which is blatantly contradictory to your party's message.
 
2013-02-24 01:43:59 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: thamike: Bontesla: Well, it's also time consuming to prepare meals with fresh ingredients. I work one job - about 10 hours ago day. No children. I barely have time to do regular house maintenance, meal preparation, grocery shopping, budgeting, etc.

The trick is to shop with meals in mind.  Buy a piece of meat, cut it up, put it into rations.  Or make a stew, portion it out, stick the portions in the freezer.  One could live very comfortably with 3 hours cooking time and $40 per week if they did this.

Three hours of cooking time a day is still way too much.  Three hours a week must be something you dreamed up.


My second wife and I would fire up the grill on Sunday afternoons and cook our meat entrees for the whole week: Lunches and dinners. Side dishes just took a few minutes each evening. Plus, when you purchase your most expensive part of the meal in bulk, it's cheaper.
 
2013-02-24 01:52:04 PM  
Taking too long for you too cook?  Get a crock pot.  Before heading out to work in the morning toss in a few chicken breasts, some water, and whatever vegetables you want, turn it to 'low'.  When you get home, it'll be ready to eat and your house will smell of culinary wonder.

As for farmer's markets in urban areas - the DeKalb farmers market in Atlanta is one of the best grocery stores I've ever been too.  And not just the produce was cheap - I got something like a quart of some red pepper spice blend for 3 dollars.
 
2013-02-24 01:56:58 PM  
So he's the southern Bloomberg?
 
2013-02-24 01:57:27 PM  

ginandbacon: Bontesla: Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich: ginandbacon: If they were serious about helping poor families eat better, they could adopt something like the SNAP program in New Mexico where food stamps are matched $ for $ to double the amount clients can spend at farmers markets. It makes a huge difference to families and to farmers. Simply restricting what people can buy is just patronizing BS.

I love farmer's markets. Mennonites grow the best freaking tomatoes ever. But farmer's markets don't reflect how poor people typically shop for food. They have very limited hours, the food is fresh and so it doesn't keep, you need transportation to get there and they aren't widely geographically distributed. They also tend to be skewed towards middle-class areas. Bloomington, IN has a farmer's market. Bedford, IN (a much, much poorer community) does not.. If Wal-Mart schedules you for the hours the farmer's market is open that week, what are you doing to do?

There are much better solutions out there than the current system. For example, the government could use its bulk purchasing power to get really good deals on staple foods and distribute those directly to poor people. But farmer's markets, while they are nice, aren't going to solve the problem.

Well, it's also time consuming to prepare meals with fresh ingredients. I work one job - about 10 hours ago day. No children. I barely have time to do regular house maintenance, meal preparation, grocery shopping, budgeting, etc.

Add children, school work, nightly bathing routines for the family, and possibly a second job.

Yeah and I'm not sure how many people even know how to cook anymore. Meal prep (planning, shopping, and cooking) takes up the bulk of my free time. We save a lot of money but it's a LOT of work.


Exactly. I am a SAHM (intermittently WAHM, when I have a contract) and I learned to cook and experiment with stuff from my CSA subscription by Googling everything. I love it, but it's a serious hobby and it takes a lot of time and easy access to the information to make that happen. I did notice recently that I was in line behind some people using EBT cards in my local store, and I was the one who looked like I was buying for the food bank with a bag of split peas, onions, turkey wings (making curried split pea soup). The items on the belt in front of me were all prepackaged, not economically resourceful choices, and not very nutrient rich. I thought to myself that the benefits should come with some health/home ec education.
 
2013-02-24 02:00:42 PM  
Sudo_Make_Me_A_Sandwich:
It would be nice if they would simultaneously loosen the restrictions to allow toothbrushes, toothpaste, soap, shampoo, toilet paper, and laundry detergent though.

Holy crap!  Many of these people already have refrigerators, you libs pretty much want us to pay for them to live like kings.  Maybe, just maybe, walking around with an itchy ass and greasy hair might motivate them to put down the crack pipe and get a job.
 
2013-02-24 02:01:58 PM  
Nimrata Kaur Randhawa Haley is shoving her healthy food agenda down our throats! Hopefully Sarah Palin will bring everyone in SC cookies to show how it should be the parents who decide what to eat and not the over-reaching government.What a bunch of hypocrites.
 
2013-02-24 02:02:57 PM  

jigger: So he's the southern Bloomberg?


Everyone point and laugh.
 
2013-02-24 02:04:08 PM  
Beyond the issue of whether it's hypocritical to criticize Michelle Obama for encouraging healthy eating for schoolkids while seeing nothing wrong with micromanaging poor people's food stamp purchases, it needs to be pointed out that the purpose of this initiative is not to improve people's eating habits. It's to add another layer of humiliation to the already unpleasant lives of the poor, to punish them for being poor, non-white, and unlikely to vote repub. Nikki Haley doesn't care about your health or your living conditions. She just wants to rub your nose once again in the fact that you are a useless sack of shiat she would happily watch die in an alley but is prevented from doing so by federal requirements and crazy un-Randish concepts like "morality" and "common human decency."
 
2013-02-24 02:07:20 PM  

Gulper Eel: In other news, it still astounds people that as a rule, government money comes with strings attached.


In other news, Republicans (they aint conservatives) care more about punishing people than helping them.
 
2013-02-24 02:09:10 PM  
Smart and classy Republican lady! I'm all for this. I never understood why WIC wasn't the standard for food stamps in the first place. Stood behind too many a welfare Big Momma and her porky brood and watched them buying up all the fried chicken, ice cream, steak and lobster, chips and greasy snacks and sugar soda by the case on my tax dollar. Made me mad. A little dose of having to eat real healthy food will straighten these sassy moochers right out.
 
2013-02-24 02:13:50 PM  

willfullyobscure: Stood behind too many a welfare Big Momma and her porky brood and watched them buying up all the fried chicken, ice cream, steak and lobster, chips and greasy snacks and sugar soda by the case on my tax dollar.


Sure you did.  You and your wife, Morgan Fairchild.
 
2013-02-24 02:18:50 PM  

GAT_00: I like how the Party of Small Government now believes it has a right to dictate what you're allowed to eat.


I actually don't mind swaying people towards making healthy eating decisions--I just wish these guys would be a little more honest about their criticism of their political opponents when it came time.
 
2013-02-24 02:20:48 PM  
On the one hand, if they  realistically had SNAP only pay for healthy food, I'm a-okay with this (not just having the same budget but mandating they can't buy chips, since that might equal the people not getting enough food--healthy is more expensive than junk). On the other, these are grown adults, we aren't their parents, and telling other people what to do because they have shiatty enough luck to need help is not actually okay.
 
2013-02-24 02:20:59 PM  

willfullyobscure: Smart and classy Republican lady! I'm all for this. I never understood why WIC wasn't the standard for food stamps in the first place. Stood behind too many a welfare Big Momma and her porky brood and watched them buying up all the fried chicken, ice cream, steak and lobster, chips and greasy snacks and sugar soda by the case on my tax dollar. Made me mad. A little dose of having to eat real healthy food will straighten these sassy moochers right out.


*Yawn* 0/10.

/I remember when trolling was an art.
 
2013-02-24 02:22:55 PM  

willfullyobscure: Smart and classy Republican lady! I'm all for this. I never understood why WIC wasn't the standard for food stamps in the first place. Stood behind too many a welfare Big Momma and her porky brood and watched them buying up all the fried chicken, ice cream, steak and lobster, chips and greasy snacks and sugar soda by the case on my tax dollar. Made me mad. A little dose of having to eat real healthy food will straighten these sassy moochers right out.


Exactly, it's not about keeping poor folk healthy, it's about punishing them for being on assistance.  'HOW DARE YOU EAT MY MONEY!?'
 
2013-02-24 02:24:27 PM  

Edwardo17: ...

/I remember when trolling was an art.


Fixt.
 
2013-02-24 02:25:42 PM  
I would be ok if they made them buy only the cheaper cuts of meat and buy the generic or store brand when they shop.  It's what I have to do to make my money go farther.  Coke and chips and junk food should be out.
 
2013-02-24 02:26:40 PM  
I'm tired of seeing people buy a cartload of junk with food stamps, but well it really isn't my business. I'd say that habits like that are why they ended up on food stamps to begin with. That mom who is buying meat in the bulk sizes, freezing portions and has a cart full of produce isn't doing it to be healthy, it's just a really effective way to save money. Eating healthier is a bonus for being smart enough to recognize the best way to shop.
 
2013-02-24 02:30:29 PM  

BunkyBrewman: Alphax: Well, there is a difference between encouraging people to eat healthy, and mandating it..


Read more here: http://www.thestate.com/2013/02/22/2642793/haley-says-sc-will-ask-for - food.html#.USoXoqXCZ8E#storylink=cpy

"That $1 billion no longer will go to candy and chocolate and sodas and chips," Haley said. "It'll be going to apples and oranges and things that are healthy."

So, let me get this straight...

It's OK that the government mandate that food stamps must be used to purchase "healthy foods", but it's *not* OK to mandate that our children eat healthy foods in public schools.


National politics vs. state.

On the national scale, the free/reduced lunch program is part subsidy for hungry children, part agricultural subsidy for the corn and potato industry. 

Watching Super Size Me, I am surprised fewer people go for the alternative school lunch program that had fresh food, lower meat and better outcomes in child behavior.
 
2013-02-24 02:31:10 PM  

willfullyobscure: Smart and classy Republican lady! I'm all for this. I never understood why WIC wasn't the standard for food stamps in the first place.


If it's anything like the clusterfark that is the WIC system here in MO (that still uses paper checks), the line would be out the door because of how long it takes to process those damn things correctly.

I used to work at a grocery store and I always dreaded having to deal with a customer on WIC mainly because of the production it is to make sure they buy the approved brand food and the approved portion, and then processing the check the correct way.

And I was in a middle-class suburb doing this, you'd be shocked at how many people use EBT cards and the types of people that use them.

To be fair though, I was working there just as the recession was starting to bottom out.
 
2013-02-24 02:32:22 PM  

PsiChick: On the one hand, if they  realistically had SNAP only pay for healthy food, I'm a-okay with this (not just having the same budget but mandating they can't buy chips, since that might equal the people not getting enough food--healthy is more expensive than junk). On the other, these are grown adults, we aren't their parents, and telling other people what to do because they have shiatty enough luck to need help is not actually okay.


It is when you view the people who use these programs as "lesser than you", which seems to be a common thought among Republicans.
 
2013-02-24 02:32:45 PM  

Alphax: Well, there is a difference between encouraging people to eat healthy, and mandating it..


But I thought that the idea of people eating vegetables was a socialist plot?
 
2013-02-24 02:34:09 PM  

quatchi: "That $1 billion no longer will go to candy and chocolate and sodas and chips," Haley said. "It'll be going to apples and oranges and things that are healthy."

Next right wing troll around here who goes on about Dems being Nanny Staters is gonna such a sock in the puss.


The difference, of course, is that Liberals love telling everybody what they can and can't do with their own money (Bloomberg - soda ban, etc) ... while this is Conservatives who want to tell people what they can't do with money being gifted to them from the tax payers for the express purpose of keeping them alive (Healthy food? yes.  Candy bars? no.).
 
2013-02-24 02:34:15 PM  

Mrtraveler01: PsiChick: On the one hand, if they  realistically had SNAP only pay for healthy food, I'm a-okay with this (not just having the same budget but mandating they can't buy chips, since that might equal the people not getting enough food--healthy is more expensive than junk). On the other, these are grown adults, we aren't their parents, and telling other people what to do because they have shiatty enough luck to need help is not actually okay.

It is when you view the people who use these programs as "lesser than you", which seems to be a common thought among Republicans.


And Farkers, apparently.

/no, you can't police what poor people eat
//not yours
 
2013-02-24 02:35:57 PM  

willfullyobscure: Smart and classy Republican lady! I'm all for this. I never understood why WIC wasn't the standard for food stamps in the first place. Stood behind too many a welfare Big Momma and her porky brood and watched them buying up all the fried chicken, ice cream, steak and lobster, chips and greasy snacks and sugar soda by the case on my tax dollar. Made me mad. A little dose of having to eat real healthy food will straighten these sassy moochers right out.


I'm sure she was able to buy all of that with the $20 or so she gets a week for food.
 
2013-02-24 02:36:06 PM  
18% of South Carolingans are on food stamps. That's a big number.
 
2013-02-24 02:36:38 PM  

ginandbacon: If they were serious about helping poor families eat better, they could adopt something like the SNAP program in New Mexico where food stamps are matched $ for $ to double the amount clients can spend at farmers markets. It makes a huge difference to families and to farmers. Simply restricting what people can buy is just patronizing BS.


Patronizing BS is one of the few things the south is good at.  Bless your heart.
 
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