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(Bangor Daily News)   25 years ago: "Oh my God, look at that bald eagle." Today: "Oh my God, look out for that bald eagle"   (bangordailynews.com) divider line 100
    More: Obvious, I-95, bald eagles, habitat destruction, Canadian Wildlife Service, Lists of IUCN Red List endangered species, United States Fish and Wildlife Service, environmental degradation, Maine Department of Transportation  
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11790 clicks; posted to Main » on 24 Feb 2013 at 10:57 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-24 12:22:13 PM  

Happy Hours: //also not really sure if bedbugs are actually resistant to DDT


Bedbugs have been DDT resistant since at least 1948:

http://www.panna.org/blog/DDT-for-bedbugs
 
2013-02-24 12:25:17 PM  
I've seen quite a few eagles from my office window in Vancouver. There was one last Friday. They don't hang around all the time because the local pigeons and seagulls usually gang up and chase them away like this.

If you want to see lots of eagles, wait for salmon-spawning season when they congregate for the all-you-can-eat buffet of rotting carcasses. It stinks like your mom's laundry hamper but you can get some nice nature photos.
 
2013-02-24 12:32:24 PM  

PC LOAD LETTER: Happy Hours: //also not really sure if bedbugs are actually resistant to DDT

Bedbugs have been DDT resistant since at least 1948:

http://www.panna.org/blog/DDT-for-bedbugs


That's not enough to convince me. I'm not convinced they're not resistant, but that study is apparently 60+ years old.

If you can breed a species to be resistant you can breed them to be non-resistant as well.

If I had bedbugs and DDT were available, I would try it.
 
2013-02-24 12:32:24 PM  

Happy Hours: I've only seen a few bald eagles in my life but every time I saw one I was amazed.

They are amazing and they are BIG.

I thought hawks and falcons and even vultures were awesome, but the Bald Eagle is a big bird. It's actually majestic.

There are a few birds which are bigger, but I've never seen one in the wild,

One of the coolest things I ever saw was a heron grabbing a fish out of a pond, holding it in its mouth for a brief moment and gulping it down. If an eagle had eaten that fish, it would have swooped down from the sky and grabbed it with its talons and flown up to a tall tree or mountain and calmly eaten it bit by bit.

I like the eagle's style.


images.nationalgeographic.com

Majestic
 
2013-02-24 12:34:02 PM  

sporkme: Majestic


That's just awkward. Are you some kind of Aussie?
 
2013-02-24 12:45:29 PM  

Malcolm_Sex: The noble beaver is by far the greatest national animal.


b.vimeocdn.com
 
2013-02-24 12:47:44 PM  

MichiganFTL: Wangiss: You hang out with liberals.

My Addams Family Values reference was apparently lost on you, like tears in the rain.


Who has the time to tear the rain?
 
2013-02-24 12:48:23 PM  

Wangiss: SithLord: staplermofo: I saw a few bald eagles at a state park this winter.  They're very disappointing.  I wouldn't mind them going extinct so we could start telling the legend instead of having the piddly truth just hanging out in a tree for like 25 minutes while my farking lens is icing up and fingers are swelling and getting gross.  Stupid eagles.  Our national bird should be like, a half-cyborg bald eagle.  Give him a backstory.  Like, he and the Mexican flag's eagle went to the same eagle dojo, but then the evil drug dealing ninjas, maybe Persian falcons, they come with their drug money, and the Mexican flag's eagle needs the money for his little sister who has TB or something, so he shoots the wing off our eagle, and leaves him for dead, but America is there and we build him biatching airplane wings with like jets and missiles.  And that's how California became a state.

Benjamin Franklin wanted the national bird to be a turkey.

I don't know what turkeys looked like to Ben, but the wild turkeys in the California foothills are very impressive.




A wild turkey in the California foothills did this to my truck's windshield. i45.tinypic.com

At least I don't have to worry about hitting an eagle... yet.
 
2013-02-24 12:53:11 PM  
i40.tinypic.com

This looks like my cat. And I guarantee she'd try this, too. She's a crazy.
 
2013-02-24 12:57:19 PM  

Publikwerks: [i.imgur.com image 682x400]


Excellent work, thank you!
 
2013-02-24 12:57:49 PM  
There's a nice lake down the valley from the highway on my way to school, and back in the fall I saw a bald eagle take off from a tree and fly across the road to the lake; that thing was HUGE. I could totally see how it would be dangerous if you hit it with your car. I agree with others too that there are generally more raptors around; I saw several on my way up to my dad's Friday, including one that went right in front of some cars for some reason. I was surprised it didn't get hit.
 
2013-02-24 01:07:35 PM  

Malcolm_Sex: The noble beaver is by far the greatest national animal.




"The beaver was probably the last thing God ever invented, because after He made it, He just said 'It don't get no better 'n that.' (Oh, yeah, I forgot to tell you, God is a hillbilly.)" - Jack Handey
 
2013-02-24 01:15:27 PM  

Repo Man: Malcolm_Sex: The noble beaver is by far the greatest national animal.

"The beaver was probably the last thing God ever invented, because after He made it, He just said 'It don't get no better 'n that.' (Oh, yeah, I forgot to tell you, God is a hillbilly.)" - Jack Handey


Yea, good, so what do you call the rest?
 
2013-02-24 01:19:14 PM  
Definately more raptors in general around now than 10 or even 20 years ago.  We have at least 1 nest of Hawks AND falcons in our neighborhood (emphasis on Hood).  First couple of years it was mildly amusing and cool for the neighborhood.....now....lots of emails and blogpost about which pets are missing.  Chickens, small dogs, couple of kittens, rabbits..........welcome to the food chain :)  We also have coyotes near the small pond at the end of the street.

Oh and a quick question for the fark nature watchers.  Does this look like a hybrid to you?
i153.photobucket.com
From a buddy of mines ranch, bout twice the size of the other coyotes we hav pics of, alot greyer and a hellova lot heavier.  Im thinking a grey wolf went slumming.  What do ya think?
 
2013-02-24 01:29:17 PM  

Happy Hours: PC LOAD LETTER: Happy Hours: //also not really sure if bedbugs are actually resistant to DDT

Bedbugs have been DDT resistant since at least 1948:

http://www.panna.org/blog/DDT-for-bedbugs

That's not enough to convince me. I'm not convinced they're not resistant, but that study is apparently 60+ years old.

If you can breed a species to be resistant you can breed them to be non-resistant as well.

If I had bedbugs and DDT were available, I would try it.


1) The Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants is the UN treaty regarding DDT and other nasty chemicals, mostly organochlorines -- DDT and other pesticides (some of them -- aldrin, dieldrin, toxaphene -- far nastier than DDT), some other deliberately-produced nasties such as PCBs, and byproducts such as dioxin.

2) The Stockholm Convention specifically allows DDT against disease vectors.  That usually means Anopheles mosquitoes, of course, but India also sprays it against sandflies.  Perhaps DDT could be used against bedbugs, if they weren't resistant, except that bedbugs are not known to spread disease to humans.

3) I have read Silent Spring.  Quite a lot of the douse-the-world-in-DDT crowd clearly hasn't.  Silent Spring does not call for outright banning of DDT or anything else but for smarter use.  People were spraying DDT in big clouds over populated areas and dumping it on cotton and other crops.

4) DDT kills "good" insects as easily as "bad" ones.
 
2013-02-24 01:37:26 PM  

orclover: Definately more raptors in general around now than 10 or even 20 years ago.  We have at least 1 nest of Hawks AND falcons in our neighborhood (emphasis on Hood).  First couple of years it was mildly amusing and cool for the neighborhood.....now....lots of emails and blogpost about which pets are missing.  Chickens, small dogs, couple of kittens, rabbits..........welcome to the food chain :)  We also have coyotes near the small pond at the end of the street.

Oh and a quick question for the fark nature watchers.  Does this look like a hybrid to you?
[i153.photobucket.com image 850x637]
From a buddy of mines ranch, bout twice the size of the other coyotes we hav pics of, alot greyer and a hellova lot heavier.  Im thinking a grey wolf went slumming.  What do ya think?


I'm no expert but that looks like a normal coyote to me. They can get pretty big and colors vary.
 
2013-02-24 01:45:45 PM  
I live on the south coast of massachusetts.   I've lived here all my life in a typical suburban town.  I'm not saying we had zero wildlife but 35 years ago it was a big deal to see a raccoon or skunk or to have an opossum mosey onto your back porch to scavenge leftover cat food.   That was the most wildlife I saw growing up, oh plus one pheasant.

Fast forward to today, I have deer, foxes, coyotes, coopers hawks, red tail hawks, a perigrine falcon, and turkeys in my yard.   My friend 3 miles away has fisher cats and snapped a photo of a bald eagle tearing a mallard to shreds.
 
2013-02-24 01:50:25 PM  

ladyfortuna: orclover: Definately more raptors in general around now than 10 or even 20 years ago.  We have at least 1 nest of Hawks AND falcons in our neighborhood (emphasis on Hood).  First couple of years it was mildly amusing and cool for the neighborhood.....now....lots of emails and blogpost about which pets are missing.  Chickens, small dogs, couple of kittens, rabbits..........welcome to the food chain :)  We also have coyotes near the small pond at the end of the street.

Oh and a quick question for the fark nature watchers.  Does this look like a hybrid to you?
[i153.photobucket.com image 850x637]
From a buddy of mines ranch, bout twice the size of the other coyotes we hav pics of, alot greyer and a hellova lot heavier.  Im thinking a grey wolf went slumming.  What do ya think?

I'm no expert but that looks like a normal coyote to me. They can get pretty big and colors vary.


It is not a Prius.
 
2013-02-24 01:55:03 PM  
i45.tinypic.com
Taken from my kitchen window. Had to use the cellphone, as it would have taken too long to get out the good cam.
 
2013-02-24 02:01:33 PM  
Saw this bad boy last week on my way out from a Forest Service cabin trip.

drewblood.com

He was one of seven or eight balds milling around, probably due to a carcass somewhere close by. This photo was from about six feet away and was the only clear frame I got before he relocated to another fence post. The golden eagles we saw were even bigger; they're like pit bulls with wings.

Here's a not very good pic of three of them roosting on a fence line in the same location:

drewblood.com
 
2013-02-24 02:04:23 PM  

orclover: From a buddy of mines ranch, bout twice the size of the other coyotes we hav pics of, alot greyer and a hellova lot heavier.  Im thinking a grey wolf went slumming.  What do ya think?


Looks like a coyote to me.  Wolves usually have a large variation in color from their bottom/belly up to their back, but not always.  Same goes with coloring on their face, especially around their eyes.  Snout is too long and narrow; wolves typically have a more broad snout where coyotes have a more triangular shaped snout.  Ears look too pointy as well; wolves have shorter, rounder ears than coyotes.

I'm not an expert, but I grew up with coyotes all over the place, and I've been lucky enough to see a few wolves in the wild.  It's obvious when you see one.

wolf:
latimesblogs.latimes.com

coyote:
encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com

And if you hear a wolf howl it's also obviously different than a coyote.  It's kind of haunting.  Much longer, deeper, and I'd say way louder.  They often start low, change pitch up, then change back down.  It lasts like 8 seconds maybe.
 
2013-02-24 02:20:26 PM  

Lee Jackson Beauregard: I have read Silent Spring.


And that's where you lost me.

It's not just that you read it - it's that you include it as a major point in your reply. It's a well meaning book, but it has been widely discredited as mostly bullshiat.

Look, I'm going to be honest. I'm not an entomologist and as such I don't claim to know for sure if current generations of bedbugs are 100% immune to DDT or not.

I've heard vastly conflicting stories about bed bugs. Most say you're farked and you might as well burn everything you own, but some say you sprinkle a little harmless diatomaceous earth(whatever that is) and they'll disappear overnight.

I'm not really sure which to believe and hopefully I'll never have to find out.

One thing I'm sure of though is that dropping literally tons of DDT over wide expanses of crops is very different from spraying a little bit around the house. I'm convinced the former is an environmental disaster, but I'm not so sure about the latter.

Have there been any recent - as in even the last 20 years - studies showing that bedbugs are resistant to DDT? Has there even been a single one? If so, I'll absorb that knowledge and join the bandwagon that DDT is not effective against bed bugs. But if there hasn't been any such study maybe you should admit you don't know.
 
2013-02-24 02:28:17 PM  

orclover: Oh and a quick question for the fark nature watchers. Does this look like a hybrid to you?
i153.photobucket.com
From a buddy of mines ranch, bout twice the size of the other coyotes we hav pics of, alot greyer and a hellova lot heavier. Im thinking a grey wolf went slumming. What do ya think?


Just well fed and maybe a winter coat.
 
2013-02-24 02:34:46 PM  
We have bald eagles here in CT now. Saw at least 6 last year.
Lots of ospreys, hawks, falcons too.
25 years ago there were none.

I was fishing in AK a couple of years ago and they were thick as buzzards. If you were fishing and hauled in a salmon and they landed on it, you had to cut your line and let them eat it. Protected animals for the win.
 
2013-02-24 03:03:24 PM  

staplermofo: I saw a few bald eagles at a state park this winter.  They're very disappointing.  I wouldn't mind them going extinct so we could start telling the legend instead of having the piddly truth just hanging out in a tree for like 25 minutes while my farking lens is icing up and fingers are swelling and getting gross.  Stupid eagles.  Our national bird should be like, a half-cyborg bald eagle.  Give him a backstory.  Like, he and the Mexican flag's eagle went to the same eagle dojo, but then the evil drug dealing ninjas, maybe Persian falcons, they come with their drug money, and the Mexican flag's eagle needs the money for his little sister who has TB or something, so he shoots the wing off our eagle, and leaves him for dead, but America is there and we build him biatching airplane wings with like jets and missiles.  And that's how California became a state.


You should teach history in high school.  Your version is just as true as what they already teach, but it's far more entertaining.
 
2013-02-24 03:32:35 PM  
We have a metric shiatton of hawks in Massachusetts now.  I've yet to see a bald anywhere other than a zoo.
 
2013-02-24 03:35:38 PM  

Happy Hours: Lee Jackson Beauregard: I have read Silent Spring.

And that's where you lost me.

It's not just that you read it - it's that you include it as a major point in your reply. It's a well meaning book, but it has been widely discredited as mostly bullshiat.


Citation needed.

One thing I'm sure of though is that dropping literally tons of DDT over wide expanses of crops is very different from spraying a little bit around the house.

I'm also sure of this.  So is the UN.  So was Rachel Carson.  So is the EPA -- California sprayed DDT against fleas with bubonic plague for a while, with the EPA's blessing.

Have there been any recent - as in even the last 20 years - studies showing that bedbugs are resistant to DDT? Has there even been a single one? If so, I'll absorb that knowledge and join the bandwagon that DDT is not effective against bed bugs. But if there hasn't been any such study maybe you should admit you don't know.

It's not just a question of whether DDT is effective against bed bugs.  DDT isn't good for humans.  It may not be acutely toxic, but it's an endocrine disruptor.  While exposure from indoor residual spraying is vastly preferable either to dousing acres with the stuff or to getting malaria, alternatives are available, such as permethrins, that are far less damaging to human health.   And bedbugs, while I certainly wouldn't want them, are a long way from malaria.
 
2013-02-24 03:36:54 PM  

orclover: Definately more raptors in general around now than 10 or even 20 years ago.  We have at least 1 nest of Hawks AND falcons in our neighborhood (emphasis on Hood).  First couple of years it was mildly amusing and cool for the neighborhood.....now....lots of emails and blogpost about which pets are missing.  Chickens, small dogs, couple of kittens, rabbits..........welcome to the food chain :)  We also have coyotes near the small pond at the end of the street.

Oh and a quick question for the fark nature watchers.  Does this look like a hybrid to you?

From a buddy of mines ranch, bout twice the size of the other coyotes we hav pics of, alot greyer and a hellova lot heavier.  Im thinking a grey wolf went slumming.  What do ya think?


Hates There is no shortage of coyotes. Please kill them. I will send you a prize if you can verify you did.
 
2013-02-24 03:39:29 PM  

Lee Jackson Beauregard: Happy Hours: PC LOAD LETTER: Happy Hours: //also not really sure if bedbugs are actually resistant to DDT

Bedbugs have been DDT resistant since at least 1948:

http://www.panna.org/blog/DDT-for-bedbugs

That's not enough to convince me. I'm not convinced they're not resistant, but that study is apparently 60+ years old.

If you can breed a species to be resistant you can breed them to be non-resistant as well.

If I had bedbugs and DDT were available, I would try it.

1) The Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants is the UN treaty regarding DDT and other nasty chemicals, mostly organochlorines -- DDT and other pesticides (some of them -- aldrin, dieldrin, toxaphene -- far nastier than DDT), some other deliberately-produced nasties such as PCBs, and byproducts such as dioxin.

2) The Stockholm Convention specifically allows DDT against disease vectors.  That usually means Anopheles mosquitoes, of course, but India also sprays it against sandflies.  Perhaps DDT could be used against bedbugs, if they weren't resistant, except that bedbugs are not known to spread disease to humans.

3) I have read Silent Spring.  Quite a lot of the douse-the-world-in-DDT crowd clearly hasn't.  Silent Spring does not call for outright banning of DDT or anything else but for smarter use.  People were spraying DDT in big clouds over populated areas and dumping it on cotton and other crops.

4) DDT kills "good" insects as easily as "bad" ones.


Did that book convince you there is a crowd of people who want to douse the world in DDT. There was. There isn't.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-02-24 03:43:35 PM  
FriarReb98

In eastern Mass., I have seen eagles at Great Meadows in Concord and over Broadmoor (the Audubon place) in Natick. People tell me they are along the Charles River near the Waltham-Newton line.
 
2013-02-24 04:19:49 PM  

Wangiss: orclover: Definately more raptors in general around now than 10 or even 20 years ago.  We have at least 1 nest of Hawks AND falcons in our neighborhood (emphasis on Hood).  First couple of years it was mildly amusing and cool for the neighborhood.....now....lots of emails and blogpost about which pets are missing.  Chickens, small dogs, couple of kittens, rabbits..........welcome to the food chain :)  We also have coyotes near the small pond at the end of the street.

Oh and a quick question for the fark nature watchers.  Does this look like a hybrid to you?

From a buddy of mines ranch, bout twice the size of the other coyotes we hav pics of, alot greyer and a hellova lot heavier.  Im thinking a grey wolf went slumming.  What do ya think?

Hates There is no shortage of coyotes. Please kill them. I will send you a prize if you can verify you did.


This guy was easily twice the size of the singles and groups of coyotes that were on the SD card, only one that wasnt brown and grey too.  Most of the coyotes on the ranch are smart enough to stay 200 yards away from the humans, and just watch ya to make sure you dont try anything.
 
2013-02-24 05:08:46 PM  

Lee Jackson Beauregard: Happy Hours: Lee Jackson Beauregard: I have read Silent Spring.

And that's where you lost me.

It's not just that you read it - it's that you include it as a major point in your reply. It's a well meaning book, but it has been widely discredited as mostly bullshiat.

Citation needed.


Oh please, if you haven't heard of any controversies surrounding the accuracy of that book you aren't even trying. You can argue that those who claim to debunk it are full of shiat if you want, but to accept it as gospel is just naive.



One thing I'm sure of though is that dropping literally tons of DDT over wide expanses of crops is very different from spraying a little bit around the house.

I'm also sure of this.  So is the UN.  So was Rachel Carson.  So is the EPA -- California sprayed DDT against fleas with bubonic plague for a while, with the EPA's blessing.

Have there been any recent - as in even the last 20 years - studies showing that bedbugs are resistant to DDT? Has there even been a single one? If so, I'll absorb that knowledge and join the bandwagon that DDT is not effective against bed bugs. But if there hasn't been any such study maybe you should admit you don't know.

It's not just a question of whether DDT is effective against bed bugs.  DDT isn't good for humans.  It may not be acutely toxic, but it's an endocrine disruptor.  While exposure from indoor residual spraying is vastly preferable either to dousing acres with the stuff or to getting malaria, alternatives are available, such as permethrins, that are far less damaging to human health.   And bedbugs, while I certainly wouldn't want them, are a long way from malaria.


The health effects of DDT towards humans is a completely different question from whether or not it is effective against fleas, bed bugs or any other household pests (like mosquitoes) and is not one I've heard brought up before. I'm not going to say it's safe for humans because I honestly don't know and it does seem logical that that which kills small things (like bugs) might also be harmful to big things (like humans).

The thing is, the arguments we hear against DDT are mainly that it is harmful to wildlife (and I believe that if it's dumped by the ton on crops) and that it doesn't kill bed bugs (which I haven't seen any supporting evidence for).
 
2013-02-24 05:18:05 PM  

Happy Hours: I'm not going to say it's safe for humans because I honestly don't know and it does seem logical that that which kills small things (like bugs) might also be harmful to big things (like humans).


And I'll just point out here that if I had used such flimsy bullshiat to support the use of DDT I'd be called out on it in a heartbeat, but since I say it SEEMS logical that that which is harmful to small organisms MIGHT also be harmful to humans it will be totally accepted and taken as truth and the "seems" and the "might" will be ignored - even though I don't have the evidence to support it.

I'm certainly not advocating that anyone mix DDT into their dinner, but I don't actually know if it would hurt them.

Okay, maybe just a pinch of DDT to flavor your coffee.
 
2013-02-24 05:19:57 PM  

JosephFinn: One of the best successes of the Endangered Species Act and the EPA.


Of course, the species was never actually endangered; populations in Alaska and Canada were always healthy, and Florida had a solid colony.  It just had restricted range.  (Similarly, wolves have never actually been endangered, either.)
 
2013-02-24 05:34:22 PM  

Wangiss: Did that book convince you there is a crowd of people who want to douse the world in DDT.


No.  Reading the wingnuts on Fark and elsewhere convinced me that there is a crowd who want to douse the world in DDT.

Indoor residual spraying is already being done.  If that's all you favor, you have nothing to complain about.

Happy Hours: Oh please, if you haven't heard of any controversies surrounding the accuracy of that book you aren't even trying. You can argue that those who claim to debunk it are full of shiat if you want, but to accept it as gospel is just naive.


Oh, I've heard of the controversies.  I've also heard of the controversies over global warming, vaccines causing autism, sensitivity to wifi signals, tobacco causing cancer, Morgellon's disease and evolution by natural selection.  Many a controversy exists only because a vested interest seeks to obscure the facts.
 
2013-02-24 05:38:17 PM  
Bald eagles are pretty nasty.  Hang out by a dump or similar where there are eagles around.  Filthy creatures.
 
2013-02-24 05:48:03 PM  
I saw this across the river from the house last spring. Looks like a nest from some angles but not really from other angles. I'll be dinged I if I know what else it could be.

Threre are plenty of hawks and I've seen an eagle on several occasions.
isleofran.com
have to go see what it looks like this year
 
2013-02-24 06:20:03 PM  
i70.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-24 06:39:34 PM  

Lee Jackson Beauregard: Oh, I've heard of the controversies.  I've also heard of the controversies over global warming, vaccines causing autism, sensitivity to wifi signals, tobacco causing cancer, Morgellon's disease and evolution by natural selection.  Many a controversy exists only because a vested interest seeks to obscure the facts.


And yet most of the controversies you mention are well-known bullshiat and full of FUD just like Silent Spring.

Okay, I'll 'fess up. I never read the book. I'm sure it contains some truth. I'm also convinced though that it contains some FUD which is not based on science but fear (and uncertainty and doubt)..

I'm all for helping the environment. I want to save the whales - really, I do, but I put this in the same category as I do the Sea Shepherds and Greenpeace (even though I know they don't even get along). The very title "Silent Spring" suggests that there won't be any birds singing outside my window in another month or two and that is farking bullshiat even 40 or so years after the books was written.

I am 100% certain I will hear birds chirping when spring comes here. It will not be a "silent spring". It's scary to think that someday there might not be birds to sing - and all the stuff that entails, but uh...it's not happening.

Maybe we need a little FUD to counteract the "Drill, Baby, Drill" movement but I'd rather have the debate centered around facts rather than the extreme imaginations of people who have no farking clue about the environment.
 
2013-02-24 06:53:26 PM  
There's an island in Sebago Lake in Maine that's had a bald eagle nesting site for about ten years now.
The state put buoys out at a good viewing distance; I've sat there more than a few times in my kayak watching the juvenile eagles hang out in the pine trees on the island while the parents go off hunting. It's funnier than hell when one of the parents comes back with food; the young ones see them miles off and start circling the island while making a hell of a racket.
 
2013-02-24 06:58:01 PM  
Two back-to-back maine threads on the front page?  I'm sort of proud of our rinky-dink state, but I'm also aware we are neck-and-neck with NY for our own tag.  So conflicted...
 
2013-02-24 07:27:43 PM  

TiiiMMMaHHH: Two back-to-back maine threads on the front page?  I'm sort of proud of our rinky-dink state, but I'm also aware we are neck-and-neck with NY for our own tag.  So conflicted...


We're way ahead of NY, esp. if you go by per capita and/or weird/bizarre.

We have GOT to have a ME Fark party one o' these days.
 
2013-02-24 08:42:30 PM  

Happy Hours: Lee Jackson Beauregard: Oh, I've heard of the controversies.  I've also heard of the controversies over global warming, vaccines causing autism, sensitivity to wifi signals, tobacco causing cancer, Morgellon's disease and evolution by natural selection.  Many a controversy exists only because a vested interest seeks to obscure the facts.

And yet most of the controversies you mention are well-known bullshiat and full of FUD just like Silent Spring.

Okay, I'll 'fess up. I never read the book. [stopped reading there]


1) That doesn't surprise me.  Silent Spring is like the Bible, The Wealth of Nations and Das Kapital in that a lot more people sound off on it than have read it.

2)  Maybe a twentieth of Silent Spring is about DDT.  And it doesn't call for an outright ban.  Which is what I noted in my first [begone, foul filter] post.  Which you also didn't read.
 
2013-02-24 09:58:21 PM  

Lee Jackson Beauregard: That doesn't surprise me.  Silent Spring is like the Bible


In what way?

You mean you believe all that shiat like many Christians profess to believe?

Hey, if you're going to cite a book, cite some farking facts from it. Don't pussyfoot around the issue.
I'm honest about my positions and I'm more than willing to admit if I'm wrong - if you can show me that I'm wrong.
 
2013-02-25 12:05:15 AM  

Generation_D: Eagles are common in Washington State and AK. So common if you aren't careful and live in suburbia your cat or small dog just might wind up dead to one.

If that denotes respect or dramatic need of thinning the population, thats up to you. But all it takes to see one is a nice drive on I-5 or 405 out by Canyon Park.


Oh, they're much closer than that.

I rent rowboats from the UW occasionally. We've had an eagle roll over like a Dauntless divebomber right over our heads and drop into the tules next to us and come up with what looked like a giant nutria. This is basically right in the middle of Seattle at the Arboretum.

I have a friend that lives on Angle Lake, there's at least one eagle that flys by looking for fish or birds to attack. Angle Lake is maybe a mile from the airport in Seattle.
 
2013-02-25 12:10:38 AM  

mab1823: [img.thesun.co.uk image 682x400]


Wow! That is something else! I can't decide if it looks like the eagle is surfing that goose or riding it like a snowboard or something. That pic is meme ready.
 
2013-02-25 12:30:02 AM  

orclover: Definately more raptors in general around now than 10 or even 20 years ago.  We have at least 1 nest of Hawks AND falcons in our neighborhood (emphasis on Hood).  First couple of years it was mildly amusing and cool for the neighborhood.....now....lots of emails and blogpost about which pets are missing.  Chickens, small dogs, couple of kittens, rabbits..........welcome to the food chain :)  We also have coyotes near the small pond at the end of the street.

Oh and a quick question for the fark nature watchers.  Does this look like a hybrid to you?
[i153.photobucket.com image 850x637]
From a buddy of mines ranch, bout twice the size of the other coyotes we hav pics of, alot greyer and a hellova lot heavier.  Im thinking a grey wolf went slumming.  What do ya think?


That is a coyote. Apparently in places where they have largely replaced wolves in the last century or so they have gotten somewhat stockier.
 
2013-02-25 05:40:52 AM  

Happy Hours: PC LOAD LETTER: Happy Hours: //also not really sure if bedbugs are actually resistant to DDT

Bedbugs have been DDT resistant since at least 1948:

http://www.panna.org/blog/DDT-for-bedbugs

That's not enough to convince me. I'm not convinced they're not resistant, but that study is apparently 60+ years old.

If you can breed a species to be resistant you can breed them to be non-resistant as well.

If I had bedbugs and DDT were available, I would try it.


And all you'd get for your trouble, alas, was a room soaked in organophosphates and bedbugs still happily munching on your legs in the night...because, really, bedbugs aren't all that affected by DDT and really never have been.

In fact, finding effective pesticides for bedbugs in general is a stone-cold biatch because they only drink blood and can fast for upwards of a year (meaning any blood-borne poison has to be something that humans can safely ingest or have on the skin), tend to live in areas where humans sleep (making most contact pesticides problematic, as you have to use something bedbug-toxic AND human-safe) and also are one of the most notorious insects in nature for developing extremely rapid resistance to most pesticides (one of the first bugs to develop total DDT resistance, also developed malathion resistance rapidly, and are developing resistance to pyrethrins rapidly).

Also, there have been some very recent studies (as in "within the 2000s") that show that bedbugs actually have worldwide resistance against DDT--even in the US, it was allowed until the 70s in general household use and was (and technically still IS) a registered pesticide that can be used in extreme emergencies--we haven't used it since home use was outlawed because the shiat don't work anymore.

Of note--it's theorised that the American outbreaks of bedbugs actually came from a reservoir population of large battery pens of chickens in Arkansas.  Yes, you're reading this right--there's evidence that at best bedbugs have both humans and chickens as hosts, and could be even one of those "crossover zoonotic" infestations that we picked up from the damn birds to begin with.  DDT in agricultural production--like, oh, massive chicken farms--was (and technically still is, with special EPA licensing) one of the registered uses for DDT well into the seventies, but chicken farmers even in the 70s and 80s had long since gone first to malathion (back in the early 60s) then to pyrethrins for bedbug control in chickens.  (Pretty much it was when the little buggers (pun intended) started becoming resistant to pyrethrins that they seem to have crossed back into human populations.)

Probably the best longterm solution (that bedbugs won't become resistant to in ten years time) is going to be a similar approach to how we now treat flea infestations in dogs and cats--namely, a combo of ivermectin (which tends to be effective against a lot of things that feed on mammals without making mammals terribly ill in the process--and is specifically known to be human safe and is in use as both a deworming medication and a preventative against certain filarial diseases) and some kind of growth inhibitor hormone in addition to a (relatively human safe) direct toxin.  (There are actually some clinical trials underway on the effectiveness of avermectins against bedbugs, as well as research on growth inhibitors.  Amazingly, Advantage Multi (yes, as in the same stuff they give to cats) is one of the combos being looked at as a possibly effective bedbug killer--and the mechanisms involved in developing resistance to avermectins are very, very different than those with traditional pesticides, enough that it'll actually continue to be useful for some time.)

Now, to get to the subject of non-dromaeosaur dinosaurian raptors... :D

Eagles are still a bit uncommon out in the Southeast outside of REALLY rural mountainous areas (though getting a bit more common, to the point you CAN see them sometimes on train trips and the overgrown ospreys get themselves injured on a frequent enough basis that they're regulars at Raptor Rehabilitation and eagle-rescue groups) but what we do get here a lot (and the population really has grown, pleasantly) are red-tailed and broadwing hawks.  Not at all uncommon to see them nomming on roadkill (or even freshly killed squirrels or rabbits or yipdogs or woodchucks), not at all uncommon to see them nesting in people's backyards raising chicks.

The thing I AM really pleasantly surprised to see becoming more common are peregrine falcons, especially as they've found that downtown high-rises and bridges are apparently the perfect nesting areas from which to divebomb the local pigeon and sparrow and rodent population--and are actively ENCOURAGED to do so. :3  Quite fun to watch them in action, it is.
 
2013-02-25 12:24:38 PM  

BoothbyTCD: orclover: Definately more raptors in general around now than 10 or even 20 years ago.  We have at least 1 nest of Hawks AND falcons in our neighborhood (emphasis on Hood).  First couple of years it was mildly amusing and cool for the neighborhood.....now....lots of emails and blogpost about which pets are missing.  Chickens, small dogs, couple of kittens, rabbits..........welcome to the food chain :)  We also have coyotes near the small pond at the end of the street.

Oh and a quick question for the fark nature watchers.  Does this look like a hybrid to you?
[i153.photobucket.com image 850x637]
From a buddy of mines ranch, bout twice the size of the other coyotes we hav pics of, alot greyer and a hellova lot heavier.  Im thinking a grey wolf went slumming.  What do ya think?

That is a coyote. Apparently in places where they have largely replaced wolves in the last century or so they have gotten somewhat stockier.


A good diet of housepets will do that.
All those nice vitamins and whoremoans infused in your foodsource, yummy.
 
2013-02-25 12:27:34 PM  

vodka: Bald eagles are pretty nasty.  Hang out by a dump or similar where there are eagles around.  Filthy creatures.


Wait till one craps on your windshield.
Balls! Complete coverage top to bottom, side to side.
BTW, they are also good shots.
Oh, and some are real pricks.
 
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