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(Outside Online)   Rescue team saves hypothermic and dehydrated woman lost in Arizona's Superstition Mountains while searching for the fabled Lost Dutchman's mine. Fark: again   (outsideonline.com) divider line 55
    More: Dumbass, Arizona's Superstition Mountains, Lost Dutchman  
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5487 clicks; posted to Main » on 23 Feb 2013 at 10:02 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-23 05:37:13 AM  
Why was the rescue team looking for a mine?
 
2013-02-23 07:09:39 AM  

cretinbob: Why was the rescue team looking for a mine?


Dude! It's the Flying Dutchman! It's, like, the Spanish Armada of gold mines.

Who wouldn't be looking for it?
 
2013-02-23 07:33:34 AM  

Vodka Zombie: cretinbob: Why was the rescue team looking for a mine?

Dude! It's the Flying Dutchman! It's, like, the Spanish Armada of gold mines.

Who wouldn't be looking for it?


Not to mention, that area is saturated in superstition. It's hard to not believe in that stuff.
 
2013-02-23 08:20:23 AM  
Why do I picture her doing a little jig and clicking her heels in the air while cackling "Gold! Gold! Heheheh!" and shooting pistols in the air?
 
2013-02-23 09:37:34 AM  
Writing's on the wall.
 
2013-02-23 10:07:51 AM  
These are the sort of twits who should be footing the bill for their own damn rescue.
 
2013-02-23 10:08:12 AM  
www.spidercanyon.com

if an 8 year old can learn to use these in an afternoon, there's no excuse for getting lost.
 
2013-02-23 10:08:37 AM  
That crazy lady believes in things / that she doesn't understand

http://youtu.be/wDZFf0pm0SE
Enjoy your earwig
 
2013-02-23 10:14:02 AM  

Fabric_Man: That crazy lady believes in things / that she doesn't understand

http://youtu.be/wDZFf0pm0SE
Enjoy your earwig


Now I'm suffering
 
2013-02-23 10:14:33 AM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-23 10:15:21 AM  
images4.wikia.nocookie.net

I found a copy of the map she was using
 
2013-02-23 10:17:07 AM  
Suppose she finds it.  What then?  The rightful owners will claim it and she gets nothing.  It's either going to be on public land and the government will claim it or it'll be on private land and the owner of the mineral rights will claim it.
 
2013-02-23 10:17:45 AM  
And her name is Clementine...
 
2013-02-23 10:18:22 AM  

BraveNewCheneyWorld: [www.spidercanyon.com image 330x247]

if an 8 year old can learn to use these in an afternoon, there's no excuse for getting lost.


Uh, it's not 3D printed, it's not from space, it's not from Apple. LAME.
 
2013-02-23 10:18:26 AM  
Robin Bird? Something tells me her parents were a little cuckoo as well.
 
2013-02-23 10:20:57 AM  
Picture of the victim(s).

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-23 10:24:58 AM  
www.coinlink.com
 
2013-02-23 10:29:05 AM  
Love hiking there -
farm3.staticflickr.com
 
2013-02-23 10:31:48 AM  
But of course...

"Robyn Byrd came to Arizona from Missouri to find the Lost Dutchman's gold mine and told her friends that "God told her where to find it."

http://www.myfoxphoenix.com/story/21302227/2013/02/21/missing-treasu re -hunter-found-delirious-and-injured-in-mountains

"These rescuers say that those hoping to strike it rich won't stop risking their lives in the Superstitions any time soon. "Not until somebody finds that mine, if there is one."
We're told that Byrd had an injury from falling down and was very incoherent when she was found off the trail, but has been recovering all day.
According to the Pinal County Sheriff's Office -- she will not have to pay for the rescue".


Call me crazy, but I think this might have something to do with your treasure-hunter problem.
 
2013-02-23 10:32:02 AM  
I did the Flatiron Trail (the peak) unplanned...we went there with a couple who werent' in great hiking shape, only planning tto do the Siphon Draw hop (basically, about 1/3 of the flatiron as i recall).  the guy said he was gonna go further while we hung out, after about an hour of him not coming back, i told the ladies i was worried, snet them down, and i went up expecting to find him with like, a broken ankle or some shiat.  up and up and up and up and up until there was no more up, just a amazing vista of phoenix. i borrowed the cell phone of a couple that was there, told my wife i didn't find Mike and they might want to call the rescue folks.

turns out Mike was at the car with them.  he claimed he went to the top, which was bs of course as I never saw him  but i can say i did the flatiron, with no damn water.

/cool story bro
//i know
///no seriously, that was cool.
////thanks brah, it's what i do
//i wish i was that cool
//i know brah, it's attainable with a positive mindset
//really?
//brah, fo shizz my nizz
 
2013-02-23 10:38:53 AM  
When I first moved to Arizona I was told not to go there because of the old prospectors that had been up in the mountains for years. It was said that newbies looking for the mine would never be seen or heard of again. (Plain English: They'd kill anyone who got near their search area)

I believe that sometime in the eighties they made it against the law to start anew prospecting for the mine. The old timers were supposedly grandfathered (apt name) in because no one would go tell them they had to come down.

I have hunted the area at the base of the mountain for years and know it well. I still see hikers wander into the area.

All said, there's no excuse for not going into the desert/mountains unprepared. Did she never hear of a GPS?

/Compass shown above is old school
//I'm open to hear if anyone can say it has any advantage
 
2013-02-23 10:43:13 AM  
The Lost Dutchman and his gold existed.  He was actually a German (Deutsch-man) who was a copper miner who stumbled upon a big gold vein.  He supposedly buried it in the shadow of a big rock spire formation.  He got sick and before he died, he gave the location to a woman in Goldfield, which is now an awesome ghost town outside of Apache Junction, and she died before she could claim it.  People have been searching for it unsuccessfully for a hundred years.
 
2013-02-23 10:45:40 AM  

fnordest: When I first moved to Arizona I was told not to go there because of the old prospectors that had been up in the mountains for years. It was said that newbies looking for the mine would never be seen or heard of again. (Plain English: They'd kill anyone who got near their search area)

I believe that sometime in the eighties they made it against the law to start anew prospecting for the mine. The old timers were supposedly grandfathered (apt name) in because no one would go tell them they had to come down.

I have hunted the area at the base of the mountain for years and know it well. I still see hikers wander into the area.

All said, there's no excuse for not going into the desert/mountains unprepared. Did she never hear of a GPS?

/Compass shown above is old school
//I'm open to hear if anyone can say it has any advantage



Batteries don't run out.
 
2013-02-23 10:47:19 AM  

St_Francis_P: Vodka Zombie: cretinbob: Why was the rescue team looking for a mine?

Dude! It's the Flying Dutchman! It's, like, the Spanish Armada of gold mines.

Who wouldn't be looking for it?

Not to mention, that area is saturated in superstition. It's hard to not believe in that stuff.


Writings on the wall.....
 
2013-02-23 10:51:34 AM  
I blame the Dutch - obviously.
 
2013-02-23 11:02:58 AM  
God told her to find it? Let him rescue her next time.
 
2013-02-23 11:02:59 AM  
Another application of an old Native American trick to lose the party-crashers.  "Gold ain't here, Man!"

"It's um, over there!  Just 500 miles that way!
 
2013-02-23 11:04:47 AM  
People should just use Google Earth.
 
2013-02-23 11:04:50 AM  
I could have saved her a long walk and expensive rescue bill:

http://skeptoid.com/episodes/4347

Honestly, those who believe in this stuff need to um... I dunno, but they need to do something involving a great big heaping of "lrn2think"
 
2013-02-23 11:10:24 AM  
"Most of the body recoveries we've done out of the Supes have been Dutch hunters," Bremson said."


Dutch season!
Rabbit season!

Dutch season!
Rabbit season!
 
2013-02-23 11:10:45 AM  

STRYPERSWINE: The Lost Dutchman and his gold existed.  He was actually a German (Deutsch-man) who was a copper miner who stumbled upon a big gold vein.  He supposedly buried it in the shadow of a big rock spire formation.  He got sick and before he died, he gave the location to a woman in Goldfield, which is now an awesome ghost town outside of Apache Junction, and she died before she could claim it.  People have been searching for it unsuccessfully for a hundred years.


There is an episode of "In Search of" that covered it, it's on youtube.
 
2013-02-23 11:20:19 AM  

BafflerMeal: fnordest: When I first moved to Arizona I was told not to go there because of the old prospectors that had been up in the mountains for years. It was said that newbies looking for the mine would never be seen or heard of again. (Plain English: They'd kill anyone who got near their search area)

I believe that sometime in the eighties they made it against the law to start anew prospecting for the mine. The old timers were supposedly grandfathered (apt name) in because no one would go tell them they had to come down.

I have hunted the area at the base of the mountain for years and know it well. I still see hikers wander into the area.

All said, there's no excuse for not going into the desert/mountains unprepared. Did she never hear of a GPS?

/Compass shown above is old school
//I'm open to hear if anyone can say it has any advantage

Batteries don't run out.


Good comment, but I carry spares. I mark my starting place, then turn it off.

Any other advantages?
 
2013-02-23 11:27:38 AM  
Damn Tea Baggers.
 
2013-02-23 11:38:53 AM  

fnordest: BafflerMeal: fnordest: When I first moved to Arizona I was told not to go there because of the old prospectors that had been up in the mountains for years. It was said that newbies looking for the mine would never be seen or heard of again. (Plain English: They'd kill anyone who got near their search area)

I believe that sometime in the eighties they made it against the law to start anew prospecting for the mine. The old timers were supposedly grandfathered (apt name) in because no one would go tell them they had to come down.

I have hunted the area at the base of the mountain for years and know it well. I still see hikers wander into the area.

All said, there's no excuse for not going into the desert/mountains unprepared. Did she never hear of a GPS?

/Compass shown above is old school
//I'm open to hear if anyone can say it has any advantage

Batteries don't run out.

Good comment, but I carry spares. I mark my starting place, then turn it off.

Any other advantages?



Don't have to move to get directional facing.  Doesn't require a team of people in the government to be paid to constantly adjust timekeeping for relativistic changes.  Not prone to military scrambling or fuzzing.

IMO too many thing s are tied to GPS in general and it makes for a potentially fragile situation.  Especially when ATMs, medical devices, etc... here and there are using the satellites for timekeeping.

Nothing against gps in general, it's just a tool.  I Use one for tracking my runs and sech, but there still much to be learned from building your own fire fro m scratch and knowing how to use a compass or track the sun across the sky for latitude.
 
2013-02-23 11:39:47 AM  
fnordest
Good comment, but I carry spares. I mark my starting place, then turn it off.

Any other advantages?


I'm sure you would never drop it or lose it, or get to a place with no reception, right? No,having a GPS means you never have to worry, it'll always work & never lead you astray, nope, never happens.
 
2013-02-23 11:52:20 AM  
I bought a GPS once from a dyslexic salesman, he mistakenly sold me a GSP; every time I get lost and push the button a French Canadian mixed martial artist shows up to find me and kicks the living sh*t out of me.....I went back to a map and compass....

:D
 
2013-02-23 11:53:44 AM  
You can actually see the rock spire where the gold is supposedly buried from a paved hiking trail in the Superstitions, so I can understand how tempting it must be for treasure hunters to want to look for it.
 
2013-02-23 11:55:47 AM  

fnordest: Any other advantages?


There's always a chance of electronics breaking despite claims of being shockproof or waterproof.  Even if you use GPS, you should have a backup map and compass as well as they only weigh a few ounces. Then again, if you carry only a map and compass, you're saving weight compared to gps alone.
 
2013-02-23 11:59:15 AM  

Ghastly: Why do I picture her doing a little jig and clicking her heels in the air while cackling "Gold! Gold! Heheheh!" and shooting pistols in the air?


Made me think of Dirty Sally from Gunsmoke.

Get off my lawn.
 
2013-02-23 12:05:39 PM  

BraveNewCheneyWorld: fnordest: Any other advantages?

There's always a chance of electronics breaking despite claims of being shockproof or waterproof.  Even if you use GPS, you should have a backup map and compass as well as they only weigh a few ounces. Then again, if you carry only a map and compass, you're saving weight compared to gps alone.



In an emergency, it's also easier to make an ad hoc compass than I imagine it would be to make an ad hoc gps receiver.
 
2013-02-23 12:10:53 PM  

fnordest: BafflerMeal: fnordest: When I first moved to Arizona I was told not to go there because of the old prospectors that had been up in the mountains for years. It was said that newbies looking for the mine would never be seen or heard of again. (Plain English: They'd kill anyone who got near their search area)

I believe that sometime in the eighties they made it against the law to start anew prospecting for the mine. The old timers were supposedly grandfathered (apt name) in because no one would go tell them they had to come down.

I have hunted the area at the base of the mountain for years and know it well. I still see hikers wander into the area.

All said, there's no excuse for not going into the desert/mountains unprepared. Did she never hear of a GPS?

/Compass shown above is old school
//I'm open to hear if anyone can say it has any advantage

Batteries don't run out.

Good comment, but I carry spares. I mark my starting place, then turn it off.

Any other advantages?


Weight. If you think spare batteries don't weigh too much, you should probably tell the military because they sure as hell spend a lot of money trying to make them lighter.

If you can't use a map and compass nearly as fast as a GPS unit takes to power on, get a fix, enter info and calculate, I'd say you need to learn the basics again.
 
2013-02-23 12:12:53 PM  

fnordest: BafflerMeal: fnordest: When I first moved to Arizona I was told not to go there because of the old prospectors that had been up in the mountains for years. It was said that newbies looking for the mine would never be seen or heard of again. (Plain English: They'd kill anyone who got near their search area)

I believe that sometime in the eighties they made it against the law to start anew prospecting for the mine. The old timers were supposedly grandfathered (apt name) in because no one would go tell them they had to come down.

I have hunted the area at the base of the mountain for years and know it well. I still see hikers wander into the area.

All said, there's no excuse for not going into the desert/mountains unprepared. Did she never hear of a GPS?

/Compass shown above is old school
//I'm open to hear if anyone can say it has any advantage

Batteries don't run out.

Good comment, but I carry spares. I mark my starting place, then turn it off.

Any other advantages?


Also, how do you know what your heading is if your GPS is turned off?
 
2013-02-23 12:33:07 PM  

BraveNewCheneyWorld: [www.spidercanyon.com image 330x247]

if an 8 year old can learn to use these in an afternoon, there's no excuse for getting lost.


Having grown up in Phoenix and spent many weeks hiking in the Superstitions, I can tell you it can be quite easy to get lost even with good orienteering skills. The trails leading into deep canyon areas get washed out regularly and it can be difficult to tell one slot canyon from the next in the late afternoon. This can result in a significant amount of backtracking and disorientation. It was not uncommon to have to lead novice groups up and out of the washes and back onto the main trails. If you've never hiked in the Superstitions, it would be hard to understand. That being said, it's my second favorite hiking spot in Arizona.
 
2013-02-23 12:48:10 PM  
I guess it's just poorly written, headline day.

//something something rudder
 
2013-02-23 12:52:35 PM  
Since this has turned into a map & compass vs. GPS debate, I actually have something to say.  The act of using a map and compass is reassuring.  Part of my enjoyment of the outdoors involves knowing that even without modern technology, I'll be OK.  I know how to make a compass from basic materials if my compasses all break.  As long as I have a good map it's all good.  Even without a map, I can read the terrain pretty well to keep myself out of trouble.  GPS is great for some things, and I would take it to any place where good maps aren't available or there are not enough landmarks for triangulating a position.  For most situations, for me, it's not worth the extra weight and complexity.  I'd rather carry an extra pair of socks or more food.
 
2013-02-23 02:35:01 PM  
Everyone should know how to use a map and compass. Even if you never set foot outside of a major city. Knowing how to interpret an abstract representation of something (map) and how to relate the two (compass) is a skill that is helpful for much more than just getting unlost.
If you want any more than the most basic understanding of math you need that kind of knowledge. If you want to understand what you're reading at more than a literal level you need that kind of knowledge.
And if you happen to loose your GPS in the middle of the wilderness it doesn't hurt either.
 
2013-02-23 02:39:39 PM  

WhippingBoy: Picture of the victim(s).


I have the weirdest boner right now
 
2013-02-23 02:45:44 PM  
I'm only here for Curly's gold.
 
2013-02-23 03:41:59 PM  

jtown: Suppose she finds it.  What then?  The rightful owners will claim it and she gets nothing.  It's either going to be on public land and the government will claim it or it'll be on private land and the owner of the mineral rights will claim it.


Property maybe but not under the mineral rights law.

Ownership of mineral rights (more properly "mineral interest") is an mineral estate, although often referred to as mineral rights. It is the right of the owner to exploit, mine, and/or produce any or all of the minerals lying below the surface of the property.
 
2013-02-23 03:57:29 PM  
She believed in things that she didn't understand.
 
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