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(First Responder Network)   It's not every day that a cardiac arrest is caught on camera. Then again, it's not every day it happens at an ambulance station either   (firstrespondersnetwork.com) divider line 19
    More: Hero, cardiac arrest, cinematographers, ambulances, police stations, cameras  
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4746 clicks; posted to Video » on 21 Feb 2013 at 3:39 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-02-21 04:02:32 PM
5 votes:
I purchased four AEDs for our company a year or so ago. I hope it was a "waste" of $6000.00.
2013-02-21 03:58:24 PM
3 votes:

Bob The Nob: Strange how his arms raised slowly by themselves right after they laid him down and began the chest compressions.

Paging Dr. Fark ...


It happens. Cardiac-induced Seizure and posturing caused by his brain not getting enough blood. If you look at the EKG, he doesn't actually have his heart stop - it goes into Ventricular Tachycardia. It's just beating "too fast" to pump out blood. They start CPR because he's got signs of poor perfusion and a questionable pulse.

If you notice to, when he does it, he also starts gasping. Those are agonal respirations, and are not effective breathing patterns. It's the reason they teach laypeople to do CPR when they see it.
2013-02-22 03:44:41 AM
2 votes:

Marshall Willenholly: I wonder if the stress of being filmed for a TV show had anything to do with him having a heart attack right there in front of the cameras?


Lolz. Any stress from being filmed is negligible compared to the stress of simply doing his job.

My wife's an ESD/911 Op. I'm a state-certified firefighter (volunteer). Emergency services is stressful work, and you don't always eat that well considering the hours involved (wife does 12-hours shifts, overnight... no lunch break. Eat when/if you can, generally quick and easy, less-than-healthy food). #1 cause of death for emergency service workers is heart attack. As a firefighter, you're MUCH more likely to drop dead in the station/at home/on the fireground than you are to actually DIAF.

I can't speak for the firefighter/police/EMT crews, but there isn't a single dispatcher in our county that isn't medicated for stress/anxiety/depression/blood pressure/cardiac issues. Being on the line with someone as they shuffle off their mortal coil is a regular occurance for the folks on the phones and radios. People dying on you all the time wears on you over the course of a career.
2013-02-21 04:04:24 PM
2 votes:
that video was somewhat intense ...thank you for no voice commentary crap. That made it a lot better.
2013-02-21 03:43:35 PM
2 votes:

WTFDYW: Nice find subster. Should be shown at CPR/AED classes.

www.cardiauk.com


It's really rare to actually catch a cardiac arrest on Camera. Even rarer for it to make it onto TV in the States. HIPAA killed a lot of the shows, like Life in the ER and Paramedics: Life on the Streets which showed what REALLY happens when a person does.

When you work as a team, good things happen.

/really shocked this went green.
2013-02-21 03:22:43 PM
2 votes:
Nice find subster. Should be shown at CPR/AED classes.
2013-02-23 01:58:09 AM
1 votes:

blackySM2: Why hasn't anyone talked about how fake this is?


if it's fake, it's incredibly, incredibly well done, down to the most minute detail.  Easier explanation is that this is real.  And yeah, this is how calm and collected well trained helicopter paramedics are in emergencies, even with their friend on the floor.
2013-02-22 07:44:18 AM
1 votes:
I have an old acquaintance who is an EMT that I bump into from time to time. He is very morose about his job. I asked how thing were going and he responded with, "Oh, saving lives, prolonging suffering."

That statement sticks with me.
2013-02-22 03:53:57 AM
1 votes:

Lets talk frankly about internal cleanliness: Marshall Willenholly: I wonder if the stress of being filmed for a TV show had anything to do with him having a heart attack right there in front of the cameras?

Lolz. Any stress from being filmed is negligible compared to the stress of simply doing his job.

My wife's an ESD/911 Op. I'm a state-certified firefighter (volunteer). Emergency services is stressful work, and you don't always eat that well considering the hours involved (wife does 12-hours shifts, overnight... no lunch break. Eat when/if you can, generally quick and easy, less-than-healthy food). #1 cause of death for emergency service workers is heart attack. As a firefighter, you're MUCH more likely to drop dead in the station/at home/on the fireground than you are to actually DIAF.

I can't speak for the firefighter/police/EMT crews, but there isn't a single dispatcher in our county that isn't medicated for stress/anxiety/depression/blood pressure/cardiac issues. Being on the line with someone as they shuffle off their mortal coil is a regular occurance for the folks on the phones and radios. People dying on you all the time wears on you over the course of a career.


An interesting note is that any Firefighter, EMT, or Police Officer who dies of a heart attack or asthma attack within 12 hours of leaving a working fire or accident scene is considered a line of duty death for the purposes of federal death benefits. Cancer deaths in Firefighters and EMTs too. Volunteers are notorious for this, they'll work too hard or get too much CO or Cyanide, or other products of combustion while fighting a fire, go home, and then be found dead the next day from a coronary.

To be quite honest, dispatchers have it harder than EMTs and Paramedics do. We have the advantage of knowing we did everything we could for someone. Dispatchers have to deal with that feeling of helplessness with every call.
2013-02-21 09:50:16 PM
1 votes:

WTFDYW: I emailed this video to my work email. it will come in handy with training sessions.

Thank you subby


If you want more videos like it, I can hunt as many as possible down. My email is in my profile.

/subbie.
2013-02-21 08:13:35 PM
1 votes:

dramboxf: I also hear a lot of medics whining about possibly losing ETI in favor or King or other advanced airways.


Never happen in the US if the NREMT, NAEMSP and NAEMT have their ways. I COULD see it in urban areas where the average transport time is five minutes, but nowhere else. Especially not in the critical care transport or helicopter EMS environment.

The idea that Paramedics should not perform ETI is based on a group of research studies conducted by a doctor who had a demonstrated bias against Paramedics having intubation in their toolkit. JEMS did an article not too long ago on it where they deconstructed the study and pointed out the major issues it ignored - namely Paramedic oversaturation, and fewer avenues for them to practice a high risk, low volume skill.

dramboxf: I helped teach a CFR class as recently as fall of 2011 and we were still All About The Long Board


IIRC, the national standard curriculum update has it that selective immobilization and spinal rule-outs are only to be done by EMT-Basics and above. It's kinda the same reason that you're not taught to titrate oxygen as a CFR or Basic, and they tell you to give everyone a NRB at 15 liters.


The solution is to stop cranking out medics wholesale from unaccredited, often corporate affiliated programs that spring up overnight and give substandard education - teaching people to pass the Registry rather than teaching them to be Paramedics. Thankfully, as of 2014, you cannot get a Paramedic if you don't graduate from an accredited institution, and this is going to kill many of them.
2013-02-21 07:56:16 PM
1 votes:
Wow.  Just wow.  That was amazing.

So glad they got him back.
2013-02-21 06:17:54 PM
1 votes:
That guy better hope he has some real good health insurance. His medical bills must be sky-high at this point.


Oh wait.....never mind.
2013-02-21 06:07:24 PM
1 votes:
after reading the intro i couldn't watch the video. it upset me just to read what happened. i don't know how emergency responders and health professionals do what they can do. i consider them hero angels and i thank God they live among us.
2013-02-21 06:05:05 PM
1 votes:

Wise_Guy: How does an AED work?


/It analyzes the rhythm of the heart, and if it sees an arrhythmia, such as tachycardia, or some other arrhythmia, it will charge, and give the user a verbal command to push the button that "hopefully" converts the arrhythmia to a sinus rhythm.  You don't (as is commonly believed) shock a person who is in a state where their heart is not beating at all.  There is no rhythm to convert, and the AED won't allow you to shock a "flat line" patient. You do CPR on someone like that, and introduce various drugs to hopefully get it restarted to a sinus rhythm or at least a arrhythmia you can convert.  The sad thing is..you have minutes to start CPR at least or there will be brain damage due to hypoxia.
Bf+
2013-02-21 05:31:58 PM
1 votes:

Perlin Noise: that video was somewhat intense ...thank you for no voice commentary crap. That made it a lot better.

AverageAmericanGuy: That was pretty awesome. Thanks for the link, subby.

dramboxf: Nice find, subby.

BronyMedic: really shocked this went green.


This, that, and the other!
2013-02-21 05:15:42 PM
1 votes:

Wise_Guy: How does an AED work?


Kind of long, but worth a read because it's in laymans terms.

Short answer: It interupts a chaotic electrical signal that causes the heart to beat ineffectively, potentially returning it to an effective rhythm. However if the rhythm preceding the chaotic rhythm was asystole (not beating), then that's what you get back.
2013-02-21 04:50:25 PM
1 votes:
Happens in station more than you might think. But in order to survive, this is exactly how quickly CPR and defibrillation needs to happen.
I think it's funny because I give the same "Your EKG is a little odd" line when I see shiat I don't like.
2013-02-21 04:37:21 PM
1 votes:

WTFDYW: I purchased four AEDs for our company a year or so ago. I hope it was a "waste" of $6000.00.


Need more folks wasting money like this.  Kudos to you, sir.
 
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