If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Washington Times)   Elementary school teachers, who are apparently NOT high on crack, claim that having their students bounce up and down on giant rubber balls rather than sitting at traditional desks makes them more attentive and calm   (washingtontimes.com) divider line 85
    More: Strange, desk chair, elementary schools, The Blaze, teachers, yoga ball, Westtown-Thornbury Elementary School  
•       •       •

3064 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Feb 2013 at 2:54 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



85 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-02-21 02:18:25 PM
I'm honestly surprised that the Washington Times didn't play up the whole "yoga chair"/"eastern meditation"/"brainwashing"/"liberal relativism"/"new age consciousness"/"obama destroying our nation" angle a little more clearly.
 
2013-02-21 02:57:25 PM
Well, yeah. Kids work better when they can move a bit, especially most boys. They're kids, not lumps. Probably will help battle obesity, too.
 
2013-02-21 02:57:55 PM
This is an outrage!
 
2013-02-21 02:59:36 PM
that is by far the most ridiculous thing I have seen in the last ten minutes.
 
2013-02-21 03:01:03 PM
I'll generally will sit on mine when I'm watching TV. Makes me feel like not so much of a couch potato if I can get some balance work done at the same time.
 
2013-02-21 03:01:31 PM
But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?
 
2013-02-21 03:01:49 PM
In other news, high school teaches claim that having their female students bounce up and down on trampolines helps them learn.
 
2013-02-21 03:02:24 PM
Now we know who to blame for the high rise in yoga eunuchs
ouch
 
2013-02-21 03:03:08 PM
How about sending them out for more recess?
 
2013-02-21 03:04:24 PM

stevetherobot: In other news, high school teaches claim that having their female students bounce up and down on trampolines helps them learn.


image citation needed
 
2013-02-21 03:04:41 PM

Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?


No lawsuits, but bashing their chins on the desk as they slid off was why we got rid of ours. (At one point about a third of our classrooms got them through a grant.)

The janitors hated them because they don't stack, and they deflate slowly, so you end up spending time reinflating every few days, with those dumb little hand pumps.

I use one at home though, and I like it for me. It's just not necessarily the best solution for a classroom.
 
2013-02-21 03:04:51 PM
While I think that sitting on fitness balls would be healthy for the rug-rats, it would waste a hell of a lot of time each day. Everytime a kid stands up his or her ball is going to roll or bounce away and cause a distraction. Having the entire class stand up would yield a 5 minute "ball wrangling" fiasco. Coming back into the classroom after lunch or recess or gym class would also require the balls to be returned to their proper placements before proceeding.
 
2013-02-21 03:07:29 PM
It's actually a good idea.  In regular chairs, people can slouch, lean, sag, etc., and a lazy body is usually followed by a distracted mind.  With the balls, you have to 'mindfully' sit up straight, and the better posture also conditions your brain that it should be more alert.
 
2013-02-21 03:08:12 PM
Almost clicked, then I saw it was from the Washington Times, that was close.
 
amo [TotalFark]
2013-02-21 03:09:38 PM

cgraves67: While I think that sitting on fitness balls would be healthy for the rug-rats, it would waste a hell of a lot of time each day. Everytime a kid stands up his or her ball is going to roll or bounce away and cause a distraction. Having the entire class stand up would yield a 5 minute "ball wrangling" fiasco. Coming back into the classroom after lunch or recess or gym class would also require the balls to be returned to their proper placements before proceeding.

Not necessarily.


ecx.images-amazon.com

 
2013-02-21 03:09:42 PM
isn't yoga a form of religion?
 
2013-02-21 03:10:09 PM

sweet-daddy-2: stevetherobot: In other news, high school teaches claim that having their female students bounce up and down on trampolines helps them learn.

image citation needed


let me google that for you
 
2013-02-21 03:10:10 PM
If they don't give them bouncy balls to sit on they'll just end up restlessly bouncing around in their chairs anyway.  I wouldn't be at all surprised if this works.  And whether it does or not, what I know doesn't work is trying to get a 7-year-old to sit still and act like a tiny little adult.  Not only will they not do it, I don't think it would make them learn better even if they could.
 
2013-02-21 03:11:20 PM

cgraves67: While I think that sitting on fitness balls would be healthy for the rug-rats, it would waste a hell of a lot of time each day. Everytime a kid stands up his or her ball is going to roll or bounce away and cause a distraction. Having the entire class stand up would yield a 5 minute "ball wrangling" fiasco. Coming back into the classroom after lunch or recess or gym class would also require the balls to be returned to their proper placements before proceeding.


Tethering the balls would solve all the issues you brought up. And if introducing yoga balls at an early age means more hot college chicks in yoga pants later then I really don't see the problem here.
 
2013-02-21 03:11:52 PM

Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?


What, are you a priest or something?
 
2013-02-21 03:11:59 PM

cgraves67: While I think that sitting on fitness balls would be healthy for the rug-rats, it would waste a hell of a lot of time each day. Everytime a kid stands up his or her ball is going to roll or bounce away and cause a distraction. Having the entire class stand up would yield a 5 minute "ball wrangling" fiasco. Coming back into the classroom after lunch or recess or gym class would also require the balls to be returned to their proper placements before proceeding.


That description made me laugh.  I just think if I was an elementary school teacher, I'd go insane watching the kids constantly bouncing on the chairs.
 
2013-02-21 03:12:52 PM

JaCiNto: How about sending them out for more recess?


Kids do need time to "let off steam", then they are much better learners afterwards. Unfortunately, lengthening the recess would go over like a lead balloon.

That would lengthen the school days. Teachers union won't go for that
They would need to hire baby sitters for longer times to watch the playground, because the union says "not the teacher's job".

It's much more attractive for the school officials to simply suspend or expel troublemakers than treating the root cause, because that requires actual thinking.
 
2013-02-21 03:18:59 PM
They do work.  the first grade in my daughter's school uses them and the teached swears by them.
 
2013-02-21 03:22:31 PM
i.ytimg.com
You know who else sat on a ball?
 
2013-02-21 03:24:43 PM

dv-ous: Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?

No lawsuits, but bashing their chins on the desk as they slid off was why we got rid of ours. (At one point about a third of our classrooms got them through a grant.)

The janitors hated them because they don't stack, and they deflate slowly, so you end up spending time reinflating every few days, with those dumb little hand pumps.

I use one at home though, and I like it for me. It's just not necessarily the best solution for a classroom.


cgraves67: While I think that sitting on fitness balls would be healthy for the rug-rats, it would waste a hell of a lot of time each day. Everytime a kid stands up his or her ball is going to roll or bounce away and cause a distraction. Having the entire class stand up would yield a 5 minute "ball wrangling" fiasco. Coming back into the classroom after lunch or recess or gym class would also require the balls to be returned to their proper placements before proceeding.


This. Unintended consequences are a biatch, but that doesn't mean they can't be tested out to see how well they work, at least. If nothing else, it does burn off a little excess energy.

/I hope you set up the ones you got rid of as hopping recess balls.
 
2013-02-21 03:24:59 PM
Hey, that looks interesti - oh, never mind. It's a Washington Times story. Clicking elsewhere. Thanks for playing.
 
2013-02-21 03:25:02 PM
Rubber room a much better idea. Otherwise soul-crushing dodgeball immanent.
 
2013-02-21 03:28:18 PM

muckin refarkable: Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?

What, are you a priest or something?


HA!

But in all seriousness, my daughter used one in third grade which helped out with her ansty-ness. Seems to work just fine. And once you got past the first hour of "hey, I'm sitting on a bouncy ball" it becomes "the chair I have to concentrate on to make sure I don't fall off" for the rest of the school year.
 
2013-02-21 03:30:20 PM
Perhaps these teachers would be interested in my innovative new program to help kids study.

southparkstudios-intl.mtvnimages.com
 
2013-02-21 03:33:21 PM

sweet-daddy-2: stevetherobot: In other news, high school teaches claim that having their female students bounce up and down on trampolines helps them learn.

image gif citation needed


I think you needed to specify.
 
2013-02-21 03:34:53 PM

Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?


They are actually recommending one of these in place of a desk chair at work precisely FOR my back. Mine's been bad so long that I've let the core muscles atrophy and I need to build them back up. The idea is that the constant movement to stay balanced will help work these muscles back into shape. This isn't the first physical therapist or doctor to propose this, either.
 
2013-02-21 03:39:44 PM
Is is the pounding in their backsides that calm them down?
 
2013-02-21 03:42:28 PM
that is by far the most ridiculous thing I have seen in the last ten minutes.
You have a hard time with the idea that kids who burn off excess energy bouncing can concentrate better? Really?

On the other hand, DO NOT use a bouncy ball as a seat if you are going to a meeting where you expect to be taken seriously. I was at a meeting where someone was predicting hard times ahead and budget cuts while bouncing up and down. It was really hard to take the information seriously.
 
2013-02-21 03:47:11 PM
Also, WTF is it today with the randomly underlined words in the headlines?
 
2013-02-21 03:53:36 PM

neversubmit: Is is the pounding in their backsides that calm them down?


Elementary school students, not high school students.
 
2013-02-21 03:56:12 PM
Is this another thread where Republicans scream that no matter what research says, the way they did it back in the 50s should be the way it is still done?
 
2013-02-21 03:56:38 PM
This would work for two or three of my students, and be disasterous for the rest. And I think I would get nausus nousice nausues sick looking at them.
 
2013-02-21 03:57:16 PM
I DRTFA but knowing how notoriously fidgety and impatient most children are it sounds like a crazy idea that's never been tried before but just might work.
 
2013-02-21 03:58:23 PM

NotARocketScientist: Also, WTF is it today with the randomly underlined words in the headlines?


Revenge for you having ablock installed?
 
2013-02-21 03:58:58 PM

Dubya's_Coke_Dealer: NotARocketScientist: Also, WTF is it today with the randomly underlined words in the headlines?

Revenge for you having aDblock installed?


FTFM
 
2013-02-21 04:00:51 PM
It works. We used it in our sped classes for the hyperactive ones. For the aspies and general Autism it was a sensory thing. Some liked heavy blankets draped on them, others liked a little bounce while sitting. We even had these inflatable pads with little rubber knobs on it for the tactile feel.

Basically if they have an outlet for the unconscious fidgeting they tend to focus better. It can be a bit distracting to the teachers but you get used to it and take it in stride when you realize it is working FOR you.
 
2013-02-21 04:02:42 PM

Gawdzila: If they don't give them bouncy balls to sit on they'll just end up restlessly bouncing around in their chairs anyway.  I wouldn't be at all surprised if this works.  And whether it does or not, what I know doesn't work is trying to get a 7-year-old to sit still and act like a tiny little adult.  Not only will they not do it, I don't think it would make them learn better even if they could.


Anyone who has worked with ADD kids would agree with you. The problem isn't that they can't focus, the problem is that they are understimulated (which is why drugs like Ritalin a classified as stimulants) and have trouble focusing on a single thing.  Giving them something else to do (i.e. bouncing on a chair while they work) make a lot of sense.
 
2013-02-21 04:03:25 PM
For those dirty farkers that thought something else...

The cushion:  funandfunction.com

/hot
 
2013-02-21 04:03:31 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinesthetic_learning

Kinesthetic learning (also known as tactile learning) is a learning style in which learning takes place by the student carrying out a physical activity, rather than listening to a lecture or watching a demonstration. People with a preference for kinesthetic learning are also commonly known as "do-ers". Tactile-kinesthetic learners make up about five percent of the population.[1] The Fleming VAK/VARK model (one of the most common and widely used categorizations of the various types of learning styles)[2] categorized learning styles as follows:

Visual learners
Auditory learners
Reading- or writing-preference learners
Kinesthetic learners[3]


When learning, it helps for these students to move around; this increases the students' understanding, with learners generally getting better marks in exams when they can do so.
 
2013-02-21 04:05:03 PM

ReverendJynxed: It works. We used it in our sped classes for the hyperactive ones. For the aspies and general Autism it was a sensory thing. Some liked heavy blankets draped on them, others liked a little bounce while sitting. We even had these inflatable pads with little rubber knobs on it for the tactile feel.

Basically if they have an outlet for the unconscious fidgeting they tend to focus better. It can be a bit distracting to the teachers but you get used to it and take it in stride when you realize it is working FOR you.


I wonder if this will work at the dinner table for my ADHD son. He cannot seem to focus at all to actually make it through a meal.
 
2013-02-21 04:06:04 PM

sweet-daddy-2: stevetherobot: In other news, high school teaches claim that having their female students bounce up and down on trampolines helps them learn.

image citation needed



(Too large to in-line)
http://24.media.tumblr.com/423c90534496130631cfe4c40bbdc513/tumblr_m hb 5wjps5m1s410g9o1_500.gif
 
2013-02-21 04:06:39 PM

Nitrox: They do work.  the first grade in my daughter's school uses them and the teached swears by them.


Funny typo, there
 
2013-02-21 04:12:04 PM

sweet-daddy-2: stevetherobot: In other news, high school teaches claim that having their female students bounce up and down on trampolines helps them learn.

image citation needed


You're so needy...

images.g4tv.com
 
2013-02-21 04:12:24 PM
http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1882127,00.html">http: //www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1882127,00.html

doodling and fidgeting helps you pay attention.
 
2013-02-21 04:12:47 PM
 
2013-02-21 04:13:24 PM
Given that it's the Times, may I presume that there's a massive part of the story missing from the article?  Perhaps some bit of information that would make this seem far less outlandish than the headline might indicate?  Kind of like that whole "smoking machines and seniors playing WoW" crap that's been going around today?  Please let me know if I'm wrong on this one?
 
2013-02-21 04:13:29 PM

jfbnr24: ReverendJynxed: It works. We used it in our sped classes for the hyperactive ones. For the aspies and general Autism it was a sensory thing. Some liked heavy blankets draped on them, others liked a little bounce while sitting. We even had these inflatable pads with little rubber knobs on it for the tactile feel.

Basically if they have an outlet for the unconscious fidgeting they tend to focus better. It can be a bit distracting to the teachers but you get used to it and take it in stride when you realize it is working FOR you.

I wonder if this will work at the dinner table for my ADHD son. He cannot seem to focus at all to actually make it through a meal.


Worth a try. Does your son have any type of "worry" fetish? Like an edge of clothing he fusses with, or an object he can't set down and has to keep moving in his hands? An inexpensive way to test it out is to sew some weighty material into a pillowcase and let him drape it over his legs as he sits at the table. I bet he spends more of his movement energy in concentrating to keep it from shifting while he sits and eats.

It needs to be a significant weight, though probably no more than 5ish pounds maybe? Just sew up a saddle and throw some pennies in it.

Of course some kids (or their parents) just needs to be medicated :P
 
2013-02-21 04:14:38 PM
Kids should stand all day and do their work at podiums.  That's the future of work.
 
2013-02-21 04:16:23 PM
Subby doesn't understand kids.  Kids who have a chance to move around a little bit rather than just sit still are easier to direct and focus.
 
2013-02-21 04:16:36 PM

BolloxReader: neversubmit: Is is the pounding in their backsides that calm them down?

Elementary school students, not high school students.


I was trying to be pervy. I have you favored as "tell me more" idk why but in this case I'm not going to. You might want to look up child sexuality and now I've grossed myself out.

I'm a sucky troll I don't know why I try...
 
2013-02-21 04:23:14 PM

Mikey1969: Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?

They are actually recommending one of these in place of a desk chair at work precisely FOR my back. Mine's been bad so long that I've let the core muscles atrophy and I need to build them back up. The idea is that the constant movement to stay balanced will help work these muscles back into shape. This isn't the first physical therapist or doctor to propose this, either.


I would suggest a Swopper:

www.viaseating.com
 
2013-02-21 04:27:44 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Something to keep the girls from fidgeting; maybe NSFW.


Dude, elementary school kids.

/I lol'd
 
2013-02-21 04:29:26 PM
simple solution to have attentive young students: start the day with a double gym period where you have the children burn up their energy running amuck like maniacs outside in the fresh air. exercises, running, sports, games. bring them in, shove a healthy breakfast down their throats, school for for 3-4 periods. then lunch and either more outdoor run around time or a nap, depending on what they need. then teach them till the end of the day.

youngsters are full of energy. let them burn it up. farking America has to get over fighting Mother Nature.
 
2013-02-21 04:33:29 PM

Glenford: Gawdzila: If they don't give them bouncy balls to sit on they'll just end up restlessly bouncing around in their chairs anyway.  I wouldn't be at all surprised if this works.  And whether it does or not, what I know doesn't work is trying to get a 7-year-old to sit still and act like a tiny little adult.  Not only will they not do it, I don't think it would make them learn better even if they could.

Anyone who has worked with ADD kids would agree with you. The problem isn't that they can't focus, the problem is that they are understimulated (which is why drugs like Ritalin a classified as stimulants) and have trouble focusing on a single thing.  Giving them something else to do (i.e. bouncing on a chair while they work) make a lot of sense.


This.

Personally bouncing would drive me bonkers, but I pay attention a million times better if I'm fidgeting in some way. For me that thing is knitting. I knit while reading, watching TV, at the movies, in class, etc. Otherwise I tend to drift off in my own head somewhere (I'm an inattentive ADDer). It helps me focus on whatever it is I'm doing and bonus! I have bunches of hand-knit socks.
 
2013-02-21 04:42:53 PM

BolloxReader: neversubmit: Is is the pounding in their backsides that calm them down?

Elementary Public school students, not high Catholic school students.



FTFY
 
2013-02-21 04:44:35 PM
It sounds like the teacher is getting good results.  Also, these are fifth graders, not kindergarteners, so maybe they have enough impulse control to use the balls as they were intended.  After all, you could just make any kid who isn't able to handle sitting on a ball go back to using a chair.  Problem solved.
 
2013-02-21 04:51:56 PM

the money is in the banana stand: Mikey1969: Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?

They are actually recommending one of these in place of a desk chair at work precisely FOR my back. Mine's been bad so long that I've let the core muscles atrophy and I need to build them back up. The idea is that the constant movement to stay balanced will help work these muscles back into shape. This isn't the first physical therapist or doctor to propose this, either.

I would suggest a Swopper:

[www.viaseating.com image 300x375]


Holy frickety-frack, those are expensive.... Thanks for the tip, though. Maybe I can get insurance to cover it.
 
2013-02-21 04:54:43 PM

StrikitRich: [i.ytimg.com image 480x360]
You know who else sat on a ball?


Thanks.  LOL
 
2013-02-21 04:56:02 PM

Mikey1969: the money is in the banana stand: Mikey1969: Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?

They are actually recommending one of these in place of a desk chair at work precisely FOR my back. Mine's been bad so long that I've let the core muscles atrophy and I need to build them back up. The idea is that the constant movement to stay balanced will help work these muscles back into shape. This isn't the first physical therapist or doctor to propose this, either.

I would suggest a Swopper:

[www.viaseating.com image 300x375]

Holy frickety-frack, those are expensive.... Thanks for the tip, though. Maybe I can get insurance to cover it.


Those are list prices. If you purchase one of those through a certified dealer you can expect to pay at least half the price of what is listed. Also, if you have legitimate back problems, typically this is something that would come out of the HR budget. Getting a good chair is important, but so is a keyboard tray and monitor arm. Most people are used to crappy stuff from Office Depot or some Chinese product, legitimate furniture however will alleviate your back issues. The number 1 cause of back pains in an office environment stems from ergonomic posture and eye strain, causing your body to contort to accommodate this. VIA produces and ships within 48 hrs also so even though you shouldn't and probably can't go pick these up from the store, you can get it that same week.

If you
 
2013-02-21 05:00:07 PM

JaCiNto: How about sending them out for more recess?


No, because they might do things like run (and slip&fall=lawsuits) or play games (like smear-the-queer=hurt feelings=lawsuits) or engage in anti-social activities (like pointing their fingers at each other and saying "bang you're dead!"=future school shooter=lawsuit).

And we can't have that.
 
2013-02-21 05:08:46 PM

jfbnr24: I wonder if this will work at the dinner table for my ADHD son. He cannot seem to focus at all to actually make it through a meal.


My son was unofficially diagnosed by his teacher last year as having ADHD.  The school PT referred him to a therapy center for sensory disorders.  He was officially diagnosed with "proprioceptive disorder."  He was constantly chewing on things, rubbing anything with a texture, and bouncing while flapping his arms.  The simple solution was a $25 core balance disc from the sporting goods store.  His attention has improved significantly at home during dinner and at school.
 
2013-02-21 05:18:47 PM

neversubmit: BolloxReader: neversubmit: Is is the pounding in their backsides that calm them down?

Elementary school students, not high school students.

I was trying to be pervy. I have you favored as "tell me more" idk why but in this case I'm not going to. You might want to look up child sexuality and now I've grossed myself out.

I'm a sucky troll I don't know why I try...


It's a technique many high school teachers seem to use, according to the greenlights here on Fark. I was simply trying for something that appeared more innocuously pervy than what you seemed to put out there, a rare opportunity for me. I'm not personally interested in child sexuality so I'll pass on that research question.

Don't worry, I'm not a good troll myself.
 
2013-02-21 05:41:20 PM
What about one of these instead?

cache.gawkerassets.com
 
2013-02-21 05:50:30 PM

Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?


In fairness, they make these neat little chairs for yoga balls for kids who have balance problems. The ball sits into a little divet and there's a back to the chair. Some even have arms.
 
2013-02-21 05:56:17 PM
They're great until you fart on one. BRBRBRBRBRBRINGGGG!!
 
2013-02-21 05:59:00 PM
Well, if we can't encase them in carbonite, I guess seating them on exercise balls is an acceptable alternative.
 
2013-02-21 05:59:09 PM
My kid has sensory issues, so this makes total sense to me.  Weirdly, the more you rev them up, the more they eventually calm down.
 
2013-02-21 06:00:38 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-21 06:01:44 PM

the money is in the banana stand: Mikey1969: the money is in the banana stand: Mikey1969: Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?

They are actually recommending one of these in place of a desk chair at work precisely FOR my back. Mine's been bad so long that I've let the core muscles atrophy and I need to build them back up. The idea is that the constant movement to stay balanced will help work these muscles back into shape. This isn't the first physical therapist or doctor to propose this, either.

I would suggest a Swopper:

[www.viaseating.com image 300x375]

Holy frickety-frack, those are expensive.... Thanks for the tip, though. Maybe I can get insurance to cover it.

Those are list prices. If you purchase one of those through a certified dealer you can expect to pay at least half the price of what is listed. Also, if you have legitimate back problems, typically this is something that would come out of the HR budget. Getting a good chair is important, but so is a keyboard tray and monitor arm. Most people are used to crappy stuff from Office Depot or some Chinese product, legitimate furniture however will alleviate your back issues. The number 1 cause of back pains in an office environment stems from ergonomic posture and eye strain, causing your body to contort to accommodate this. VIA produces and ships within 48 hrs also so even though you shouldn't and probably can't go pick these up from the store, you can get it that same week.

If you


Cool, thanks. I might have to get one of these for home, too. The back issues far predate my working in an office environment, but they have gotten exponentially worse since then.
 
2013-02-21 06:20:44 PM
My son cannot concentrate in class or at home unless he is fidgeting -  legs, feet, or fingers are constantly moving.  Forcing him to stop agitates him, as he focusses on his non-fidgetiness.  It's weird, but true.
 
2013-02-21 06:24:08 PM

CapeFearCadaver: I'll generally will sit on mine when I'm watching TV. Makes me feel like not so much of a couch potato if I can get some balance work done at the same time.


You sit on kids?
 
2013-02-21 06:58:59 PM
"ball wrangling"
 
2013-02-21 07:03:27 PM

highendmighty: My son cannot concentrate in class or at home unless he is fidgeting -  legs, feet, or fingers are constantly moving.  Forcing him to stop agitates him, as he focusses on his non-fidgetiness.  It's weird, but true.


My kid is the same way but my wife forces her to stop doing it. No way to explain this to Tiger Mom.

Also our local charter Montesorri school had bouncy ball seats.
 
2013-02-21 07:40:42 PM
woordup.com
 
2013-02-21 08:21:02 PM

Pocket Ninja: I'm honestly surprised that the Washington Times didn't play up the whole "yoga chair"/"eastern meditation"/"brainwashing"/"liberal relativism"/"new age consciousness"/"obama destroying our nation" angle a little more clearly.


I'll have to take your word on that, since I don't bother with what the inmates at the Washington Times Have to say.
 
2013-02-21 08:28:31 PM

blatz514: sweet-daddy-2: stevetherobot: In other news, high school teaches claim that having their female students bounce up and down on trampolines helps them learn.

image citation needed

You're so needy...


I liked the redheaded Juggie the best.
 
2013-02-21 09:42:31 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Something to keep the girls from fidgeting; maybe NSFW.


I would think that that would result in excess fidgeting. And squirming. And rhythmic moving up and down.
 
2013-02-22 11:39:14 AM
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com
I've never seen anything like this.
 
2013-02-22 11:44:08 AM
You don't want one with slats.
encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
/I'm so scared.
 
2013-02-22 04:51:26 PM

Gordon Bennett: I DRTFA but knowing how notoriously fidgety and impatient most children are it sounds like a crazy idea that's never been tried before but just might work.


Yeah, you supposedly have to constantly focus on not sliding off the damn thing, so I can sort of see it at least keeping the kids awake.  I'm not sure if that would distract them from actually learning, though.
 
Displayed 85 of 85 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report