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(Washington Times)   Elementary school teachers, who are apparently NOT high on crack, claim that having their students bounce up and down on giant rubber balls rather than sitting at traditional desks makes them more attentive and calm   (washingtontimes.com) divider line 85
    More: Strange, desk chair, elementary schools, The Blaze, teachers, yoga ball, Westtown-Thornbury Elementary School  
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3066 clicks; posted to Main » on 21 Feb 2013 at 2:54 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-21 02:18:25 PM  
I'm honestly surprised that the Washington Times didn't play up the whole "yoga chair"/"eastern meditation"/"brainwashing"/"liberal relativism"/"new age consciousness"/"obama destroying our nation" angle a little more clearly.
 
2013-02-21 02:57:25 PM  
Well, yeah. Kids work better when they can move a bit, especially most boys. They're kids, not lumps. Probably will help battle obesity, too.
 
2013-02-21 02:57:55 PM  
This is an outrage!
 
2013-02-21 02:59:36 PM  
that is by far the most ridiculous thing I have seen in the last ten minutes.
 
2013-02-21 03:01:03 PM  
I'll generally will sit on mine when I'm watching TV. Makes me feel like not so much of a couch potato if I can get some balance work done at the same time.
 
2013-02-21 03:01:31 PM  
But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?
 
2013-02-21 03:01:49 PM  
In other news, high school teaches claim that having their female students bounce up and down on trampolines helps them learn.
 
2013-02-21 03:02:24 PM  
Now we know who to blame for the high rise in yoga eunuchs
ouch
 
2013-02-21 03:03:08 PM  
How about sending them out for more recess?
 
2013-02-21 03:04:24 PM  

stevetherobot: In other news, high school teaches claim that having their female students bounce up and down on trampolines helps them learn.


image citation needed
 
2013-02-21 03:04:41 PM  

Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?


No lawsuits, but bashing their chins on the desk as they slid off was why we got rid of ours. (At one point about a third of our classrooms got them through a grant.)

The janitors hated them because they don't stack, and they deflate slowly, so you end up spending time reinflating every few days, with those dumb little hand pumps.

I use one at home though, and I like it for me. It's just not necessarily the best solution for a classroom.
 
2013-02-21 03:04:51 PM  
While I think that sitting on fitness balls would be healthy for the rug-rats, it would waste a hell of a lot of time each day. Everytime a kid stands up his or her ball is going to roll or bounce away and cause a distraction. Having the entire class stand up would yield a 5 minute "ball wrangling" fiasco. Coming back into the classroom after lunch or recess or gym class would also require the balls to be returned to their proper placements before proceeding.
 
2013-02-21 03:07:29 PM  
It's actually a good idea.  In regular chairs, people can slouch, lean, sag, etc., and a lazy body is usually followed by a distracted mind.  With the balls, you have to 'mindfully' sit up straight, and the better posture also conditions your brain that it should be more alert.
 
2013-02-21 03:08:12 PM  
Almost clicked, then I saw it was from the Washington Times, that was close.
 
amo [TotalFark]
2013-02-21 03:09:38 PM  

cgraves67: While I think that sitting on fitness balls would be healthy for the rug-rats, it would waste a hell of a lot of time each day. Everytime a kid stands up his or her ball is going to roll or bounce away and cause a distraction. Having the entire class stand up would yield a 5 minute "ball wrangling" fiasco. Coming back into the classroom after lunch or recess or gym class would also require the balls to be returned to their proper placements before proceeding.

Not necessarily.


ecx.images-amazon.com

 
2013-02-21 03:09:42 PM  
isn't yoga a form of religion?
 
2013-02-21 03:10:09 PM  

sweet-daddy-2: stevetherobot: In other news, high school teaches claim that having their female students bounce up and down on trampolines helps them learn.

image citation needed


let me google that for you
 
2013-02-21 03:10:10 PM  
If they don't give them bouncy balls to sit on they'll just end up restlessly bouncing around in their chairs anyway.  I wouldn't be at all surprised if this works.  And whether it does or not, what I know doesn't work is trying to get a 7-year-old to sit still and act like a tiny little adult.  Not only will they not do it, I don't think it would make them learn better even if they could.
 
2013-02-21 03:11:20 PM  

cgraves67: While I think that sitting on fitness balls would be healthy for the rug-rats, it would waste a hell of a lot of time each day. Everytime a kid stands up his or her ball is going to roll or bounce away and cause a distraction. Having the entire class stand up would yield a 5 minute "ball wrangling" fiasco. Coming back into the classroom after lunch or recess or gym class would also require the balls to be returned to their proper placements before proceeding.


Tethering the balls would solve all the issues you brought up. And if introducing yoga balls at an early age means more hot college chicks in yoga pants later then I really don't see the problem here.
 
2013-02-21 03:11:52 PM  

Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?


What, are you a priest or something?
 
2013-02-21 03:11:59 PM  

cgraves67: While I think that sitting on fitness balls would be healthy for the rug-rats, it would waste a hell of a lot of time each day. Everytime a kid stands up his or her ball is going to roll or bounce away and cause a distraction. Having the entire class stand up would yield a 5 minute "ball wrangling" fiasco. Coming back into the classroom after lunch or recess or gym class would also require the balls to be returned to their proper placements before proceeding.


That description made me laugh.  I just think if I was an elementary school teacher, I'd go insane watching the kids constantly bouncing on the chairs.
 
2013-02-21 03:12:52 PM  

JaCiNto: How about sending them out for more recess?


Kids do need time to "let off steam", then they are much better learners afterwards. Unfortunately, lengthening the recess would go over like a lead balloon.

That would lengthen the school days. Teachers union won't go for that
They would need to hire baby sitters for longer times to watch the playground, because the union says "not the teacher's job".

It's much more attractive for the school officials to simply suspend or expel troublemakers than treating the root cause, because that requires actual thinking.
 
2013-02-21 03:18:59 PM  
They do work.  the first grade in my daughter's school uses them and the teached swears by them.
 
2013-02-21 03:22:31 PM  
i.ytimg.com
You know who else sat on a ball?
 
2013-02-21 03:24:43 PM  

dv-ous: Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?

No lawsuits, but bashing their chins on the desk as they slid off was why we got rid of ours. (At one point about a third of our classrooms got them through a grant.)

The janitors hated them because they don't stack, and they deflate slowly, so you end up spending time reinflating every few days, with those dumb little hand pumps.

I use one at home though, and I like it for me. It's just not necessarily the best solution for a classroom.


cgraves67: While I think that sitting on fitness balls would be healthy for the rug-rats, it would waste a hell of a lot of time each day. Everytime a kid stands up his or her ball is going to roll or bounce away and cause a distraction. Having the entire class stand up would yield a 5 minute "ball wrangling" fiasco. Coming back into the classroom after lunch or recess or gym class would also require the balls to be returned to their proper placements before proceeding.


This. Unintended consequences are a biatch, but that doesn't mean they can't be tested out to see how well they work, at least. If nothing else, it does burn off a little excess energy.

/I hope you set up the ones you got rid of as hopping recess balls.
 
2013-02-21 03:24:59 PM  
Hey, that looks interesti - oh, never mind. It's a Washington Times story. Clicking elsewhere. Thanks for playing.
 
2013-02-21 03:25:02 PM  
Rubber room a much better idea. Otherwise soul-crushing dodgeball immanent.
 
2013-02-21 03:28:18 PM  

muckin refarkable: Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?

What, are you a priest or something?


HA!

But in all seriousness, my daughter used one in third grade which helped out with her ansty-ness. Seems to work just fine. And once you got past the first hour of "hey, I'm sitting on a bouncy ball" it becomes "the chair I have to concentrate on to make sure I don't fall off" for the rest of the school year.
 
2013-02-21 03:30:20 PM  
Perhaps these teachers would be interested in my innovative new program to help kids study.

southparkstudios-intl.mtvnimages.com
 
2013-02-21 03:33:21 PM  

sweet-daddy-2: stevetherobot: In other news, high school teaches claim that having their female students bounce up and down on trampolines helps them learn.

image gif citation needed


I think you needed to specify.
 
2013-02-21 03:34:53 PM  

Walker: But I need back support. And how about the lawsuits when kids fall off the balls?


They are actually recommending one of these in place of a desk chair at work precisely FOR my back. Mine's been bad so long that I've let the core muscles atrophy and I need to build them back up. The idea is that the constant movement to stay balanced will help work these muscles back into shape. This isn't the first physical therapist or doctor to propose this, either.
 
2013-02-21 03:39:44 PM  
Is is the pounding in their backsides that calm them down?
 
2013-02-21 03:42:28 PM  
that is by far the most ridiculous thing I have seen in the last ten minutes.
You have a hard time with the idea that kids who burn off excess energy bouncing can concentrate better? Really?

On the other hand, DO NOT use a bouncy ball as a seat if you are going to a meeting where you expect to be taken seriously. I was at a meeting where someone was predicting hard times ahead and budget cuts while bouncing up and down. It was really hard to take the information seriously.
 
2013-02-21 03:47:11 PM  
Also, WTF is it today with the randomly underlined words in the headlines?
 
2013-02-21 03:53:36 PM  

neversubmit: Is is the pounding in their backsides that calm them down?


Elementary school students, not high school students.
 
2013-02-21 03:56:12 PM  
Is this another thread where Republicans scream that no matter what research says, the way they did it back in the 50s should be the way it is still done?
 
2013-02-21 03:56:38 PM  
This would work for two or three of my students, and be disasterous for the rest. And I think I would get nausus nousice nausues sick looking at them.
 
2013-02-21 03:57:16 PM  
I DRTFA but knowing how notoriously fidgety and impatient most children are it sounds like a crazy idea that's never been tried before but just might work.
 
2013-02-21 03:58:23 PM  

NotARocketScientist: Also, WTF is it today with the randomly underlined words in the headlines?


Revenge for you having ablock installed?
 
2013-02-21 03:58:58 PM  

Dubya's_Coke_Dealer: NotARocketScientist: Also, WTF is it today with the randomly underlined words in the headlines?

Revenge for you having aDblock installed?


FTFM
 
2013-02-21 04:00:51 PM  
It works. We used it in our sped classes for the hyperactive ones. For the aspies and general Autism it was a sensory thing. Some liked heavy blankets draped on them, others liked a little bounce while sitting. We even had these inflatable pads with little rubber knobs on it for the tactile feel.

Basically if they have an outlet for the unconscious fidgeting they tend to focus better. It can be a bit distracting to the teachers but you get used to it and take it in stride when you realize it is working FOR you.
 
2013-02-21 04:02:42 PM  

Gawdzila: If they don't give them bouncy balls to sit on they'll just end up restlessly bouncing around in their chairs anyway.  I wouldn't be at all surprised if this works.  And whether it does or not, what I know doesn't work is trying to get a 7-year-old to sit still and act like a tiny little adult.  Not only will they not do it, I don't think it would make them learn better even if they could.


Anyone who has worked with ADD kids would agree with you. The problem isn't that they can't focus, the problem is that they are understimulated (which is why drugs like Ritalin a classified as stimulants) and have trouble focusing on a single thing.  Giving them something else to do (i.e. bouncing on a chair while they work) make a lot of sense.
 
2013-02-21 04:03:25 PM  
For those dirty farkers that thought something else...

The cushion:  funandfunction.com

/hot
 
2013-02-21 04:03:31 PM  
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kinesthetic_learning

Kinesthetic learning (also known as tactile learning) is a learning style in which learning takes place by the student carrying out a physical activity, rather than listening to a lecture or watching a demonstration. People with a preference for kinesthetic learning are also commonly known as "do-ers". Tactile-kinesthetic learners make up about five percent of the population.[1] The Fleming VAK/VARK model (one of the most common and widely used categorizations of the various types of learning styles)[2] categorized learning styles as follows:

Visual learners
Auditory learners
Reading- or writing-preference learners
Kinesthetic learners[3]


When learning, it helps for these students to move around; this increases the students' understanding, with learners generally getting better marks in exams when they can do so.
 
2013-02-21 04:05:03 PM  

ReverendJynxed: It works. We used it in our sped classes for the hyperactive ones. For the aspies and general Autism it was a sensory thing. Some liked heavy blankets draped on them, others liked a little bounce while sitting. We even had these inflatable pads with little rubber knobs on it for the tactile feel.

Basically if they have an outlet for the unconscious fidgeting they tend to focus better. It can be a bit distracting to the teachers but you get used to it and take it in stride when you realize it is working FOR you.


I wonder if this will work at the dinner table for my ADHD son. He cannot seem to focus at all to actually make it through a meal.
 
2013-02-21 04:06:04 PM  

sweet-daddy-2: stevetherobot: In other news, high school teaches claim that having their female students bounce up and down on trampolines helps them learn.

image citation needed



(Too large to in-line)
http://24.media.tumblr.com/423c90534496130631cfe4c40bbdc513/tumblr_m hb 5wjps5m1s410g9o1_500.gif
 
2013-02-21 04:06:39 PM  

Nitrox: They do work.  the first grade in my daughter's school uses them and the teached swears by them.


Funny typo, there
 
2013-02-21 04:12:04 PM  

sweet-daddy-2: stevetherobot: In other news, high school teaches claim that having their female students bounce up and down on trampolines helps them learn.

image citation needed


You're so needy...

images.g4tv.com
 
2013-02-21 04:12:24 PM  
http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1882127,00.html">http: //www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1882127,00.html

doodling and fidgeting helps you pay attention.
 
2013-02-21 04:12:47 PM  
 
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