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(The Detroit_News)   George and Mitt Romney's 1964 Rambler is being auctioned on eBay. Car has no rust, minor dings, steering tends to drift to the right   (detroitnews.com) divider line 17
    More: Interesting, rambler, eBay, steering, Mitt Romney, field Hills, American Motors, auctions  
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821 clicks; posted to Politics » on 21 Feb 2013 at 8:48 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-21 04:48:15 AM
Not the one with dog poop on the roof, I think.
 
2013-02-21 06:07:31 AM
Brilliant headline, subby.
 
2013-02-21 08:55:00 AM
Somebody needs to buy this car and burn it to the ground.
 
2013-02-21 08:55:50 AM
Drift to the right?  That car is all over the road and the driver is lost.
 
2013-02-21 09:02:24 AM
Pros:  Will run for seven years without even a minor tune up
Cons: Eventually the wheels will fall off in a spectacular fashion, couldn't beat a Kenyan in a marathon
 
2013-02-21 09:32:53 AM
Does it talk?

mcgarnagle.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-02-21 09:34:34 AM
"He dubbed it a compact car - a car that would slay the gas-guzzling dinosaurs," Mitt Romney said in his 2007 speech in Dearborn. "It transformed the industry."

How does he figure it transformed anything? It was introduced at a time when the Big 3 will still deep in the throws of the muscle and pony car era and it never really caught on in the 70s when economy became important because Japan had re-entered the market with competitive economy cars that bested AMC's offerings. AMC straggled along for another decade or so until it was swallowed and killed by Chrysler.

AMC didn't transform shiat. It was a nice idea, but it was at the wrong time. If the Rambler had come out in the early 70s maybe it would have a shot as the muscle cars died off and the initial attempts by the Japanese to enter the market sputtered and failed, but that's not what happened.

Most people don't know what a Rambler is because the Rambler is just a historical footnote in automotive history.
 
2013-02-21 12:21:37 PM
I've heard that you need to put a lot of money into it before it can run properly.
 
2013-02-21 01:35:46 PM

germ78: I've heard that you need to put a lot of money into it before it can run properly.


And even then, you never feel like you got your money's worth.
 
2013-02-21 02:14:17 PM

Alphax: Not the one with dog poop on the roof, I think.


Came here to say something about a roof rack for a dog, this will do just fine.
 
2013-02-21 02:26:27 PM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: "He dubbed it a compact car - a car that would slay the gas-guzzling dinosaurs," Mitt Romney said in his 2007 speech in Dearborn. "It transformed the industry."

How does he figure it transformed anything? It was introduced at a time when the Big 3 will still deep in the throws of the muscle and pony car era and it never really caught on in the 70s when economy became important because Japan had re-entered the market with competitive economy cars that bested AMC's offerings. AMC straggled along for another decade or so until it was swallowed and killed by Chrysler.

AMC didn't transform shiat. It was a nice idea, but it was at the wrong time. If the Rambler had come out in the early 70s maybe it would have a shot as the muscle cars died off and the initial attempts by the Japanese to enter the market sputtered and failed, but that's not what happened.

Most people don't know what a Rambler is because the Rambler is just a historical footnote in automotive history.


The popularity of the Rambler (and some imports) in the late 1950s lead to the Big Three bringing out their compact cars in 1960, and intermediate-sized cars a few years later. So yeah, it did transform the industry.
 
2013-02-21 02:52:12 PM
I remember the vacuum operated windshield wipers and the foot pump windshield washer in my '67 Rambler.
 
2013-02-21 03:00:40 PM

bingethinker: The popularity of the Rambler (and some imports) in the late 1950s lead to the Big Three bringing out their compact cars in 1960...


Which they then promptly started dropping large displacement, gas-guzzling V6 and V8 motors in. And they were compact in name only at that point since things like the Corvair were still fairly large cars.

I don't think it really counts as transformation if the fundamental behavior doesn't actually change. True compact cars didn't take off in the U.S. until the mid 70s when imports became popular and started the trend in that segment that continues to this day. The Rambler may have slightly shrunk American cars on average from land yachts to something more akin to a large midsize car, but it didn't change the love affair with gas guzzlers and little if anything that the Rambler introduced can be seen in cars today.

Cars like the original Accord and the Datsun 510 transformed the industry in the way Romney is talking about, not the Rambler.
 
2013-02-21 03:01:48 PM

bingethinker: Vegan Meat Popsicle: "He dubbed it a compact car - a car that would slay the gas-guzzling dinosaurs," Mitt Romney said in his 2007 speech in Dearborn. "It transformed the industry."

How does he figure it transformed anything? It was introduced at a time when the Big 3 will still deep in the throws of the muscle and pony car era and it never really caught on in the 70s when economy became important because Japan had re-entered the market with competitive economy cars that bested AMC's offerings. AMC straggled along for another decade or so until it was swallowed and killed by Chrysler.

AMC didn't transform shiat. It was a nice idea, but it was at the wrong time. If the Rambler had come out in the early 70s maybe it would have a shot as the muscle cars died off and the initial attempts by the Japanese to enter the market sputtered and failed, but that's not what happened.

Most people don't know what a Rambler is because the Rambler is just a historical footnote in automotive history.

The popularity of the Rambler (and some imports) in the late 1950s lead to the Big Three bringing out their compact cars in 1960, and intermediate-sized cars a few years later. So yeah, it did transform the industry.


Yup. The Falcon, Valiant, and Nova were all responses to the Rambler. Those cars served as the basis for the Mustang, Camaro, and Charger.
 
2013-02-21 03:10:16 PM
Hey buddy, how do I get this car outta second gear?
 
2013-02-21 04:12:56 PM

RobotSpider: germ78: I've heard that you need to put a lot of money into it before it can run properly.

And even then, you never feel like you got your money's worth.


Yeah, it even gets beat by imports from Kenya. :p
 
2013-02-21 08:55:56 PM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: bingethinker: The popularity of the Rambler (and some imports) in the late 1950s lead to the Big Three bringing out their compact cars in 1960...

Which they then promptly started dropping large displacement, gas-guzzling V6 and V8 motors in. And they were compact in name only at that point since things like the Corvair were still fairly large cars.

I don't think it really counts as transformation if the fundamental behavior doesn't actually change. True compact cars didn't take off in the U.S. until the mid 70s when imports became popular and started the trend in that segment that continues to this day. The Rambler may have slightly shrunk American cars on average from land yachts to something more akin to a large midsize car, but it didn't change the love affair with gas guzzlers and little if anything that the Rambler introduced can be seen in cars today.

Cars like the original Accord and the Datsun 510 transformed the industry in the way Romney is talking about, not the Rambler.


I think you're confused as to what size a "compact" car is. Maybe it looks large to you compared to modern cars, but the Rambler (and the Falcon, Corvair, etc.) was much smaller than the full-size cars of its era. It was so much smaller that automakers came out with "intermediate-sized" cars to fill in the gap. And the original Accord and 510 are way smaller than the Rambler. You're mixing up the move to compact cars in the early 1960s with the move to SUB-compact cars in the 1970s.
 
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