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(Slate)   And I shall call it...Mini Planet   (slate.com) divider line 5
    More: Cool, planets, exoplanets, astronomers, Kepler observatory, light-years, astronomical transit, orbits  
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4931 clicks; posted to Geek » on 20 Feb 2013 at 6:21 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-21 04:43:40 AM
1 votes:
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2013-02-21 04:39:59 AM
1 votes:

dennysgod: ManateeGag: so THAT's a planet, but Pluto gets farked?

That's because it's still bigger then Pluto, hell our Moon is bigger then Pluto.


And Pluto is mostly made out of ice, and has an orbit which crosses the orbit of another planet...

Pluto ain't a planet.

=Smidge=
2013-02-20 08:18:37 PM
1 votes:

meanmutton: ManateeGag: so THAT's a planet, but Pluto gets farked?

The term planet has no definition based on size.  This a planet because it's (presumably) cleared its orbit of any other objects.  (I'm saying presumably because if there was an asteroid belt we would likely have never detected it).

Pluto is no more a planet than Ceres, Makemake, Eris, or Haumea.


And they aren't planets because no one could possibly remember more than 9? Sorry, we should have craptons of planets if that's the breaks, not make it 8 cause a small subset of scientists couldn't think of a good reason to include Pluto that would exclude similar "non"-planets. At least a few of which there is no good reason to exclude.

Hell, if a planet the size of freaking Jupiter went rogue and ended up in orbit off plane around our son, it wouldn't be a "planet" either. That's just foolish.

Ceres is 950km in diameter, and in between Mars and Jupiter, orbits the sun at about 10 degrees off plane, and appears to have satellites/moons of its own. Stop me when this no longer sounds like a planet. Unless it's too small.

Pluto is ~2200km in diameter, has a significant moon, orbits at 17 degrees and has an oddly ovular orbit unlike the 8 planets and Ceres, possibly due to being a captured rogue "planet". The only reason it wouldn't be a planet is an arbitrary orbital distinction, which Ceres lacks.

Both Pluto and Ceres have really good planet qualifications and were arbitrarily excluded because we didn't want "too many".

You want to better define planet, fine. Make it based on size/mass/ability to sustain a spheroid shape/atmospheric capability, something logical  and reasonable. Why make it based on arbitrary planar guidelines and debris existing in an objects orbit?

\Moon needs looking at as a word far more than planet did. If you got a tennis ball into space, and could toss it around a planet, and get it orbit... BAM moon. Nice definition. Debris should not = moon. % size relative to planet, flat size... something. There are "moons" vastly smaller than asteroids. When 1km diameter can make a moon. That's a fail.
2013-02-20 07:41:49 PM
1 votes:

ManateeGag: so THAT's a planet, but Pluto gets farked?


The term planet has no definition based on size.  This a planet because it's (presumably) cleared its orbit of any other objects.  (I'm saying presumably because if there was an asteroid belt we would likely have never detected it).

Pluto is no more a planet than Ceres, Makemake, Eris, or Haumea.
2013-02-20 06:35:44 PM
1 votes:

ManateeGag: so THAT's a planet, but Pluto gets farked?


Eh. The IAU "definition" of planet is kind of meaningless anyway, with huge amounts of grey area, and things that should be  planets but aren't because of technicalities. As our knowledge expands, we'll see increasing problems in this shortsighted definition.
 
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