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(Cracked)   Five things record labels don't want you to know. Also, Lars Ulrich is still a douche (but you already knew that)   (cracked.com) divider line 18
    More: Asinine, Lars Ulrich, record labels, MS Paint, douche bags, airplay, Nielsen SoundScan, bikini models, Carly Rae Jepsen  
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13121 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 20 Feb 2013 at 9:50 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-20 10:06:58 AM  
5 votes:

PanicMan: I don't think Lars Ulrich is a douche.


Nice try, Lars.
2013-02-20 09:57:48 AM  
5 votes:
nice link to the second page, subby, kinda made that suck
2013-02-20 09:03:09 AM  
4 votes:
Generally, I'm someone who likes owning a hard copy of something... music, TV, movies, whatever, and have no problem paying for it.

But, fark the RIAA and the music industry. Artists see virtually nothing from album sales, so don't feel too bad about buying used, or just downloading music for free. Go see a live show by your favorite artists, instead. That's where they actually see money for their work, and the record companies aren't pocketing 99.9% of the profits.

/again, fark the RIAA.
2013-02-20 08:55:50 PM  
2 votes:
Lars isn't a douche.  His complaint was 100% valid.  They were getting robbed blind.  His mistake was being the face of the issue.  That was a PR nightmare.  he should have hidden behind lawyers and lobbyists like everyone else does.

his point, though, was true.  His lyrics are not public domain, or gifts.  That is his day job, and he deserves to be compensated.
2013-02-20 11:25:37 AM  
2 votes:
I think we should clarify that there are 2 types of record labels these days. Giant corporations that eat the soul of every artist in exchange for making some old dude in an ivory tower rich and the small labels who are essentially one or a small group of fans that decided to invest in bands. No one really makes much money out of the deal but independent artists get music distributed. Right now I just finalized deals with 2 such labels and it's pretty cool. You get to personally know who you deal with, the small label gets a bunch of your physical copies/merchandise made for you and you get a percentage of what they have made to sell yourself. It's a win win for everyone involved. There are no crazy back stabbing contracts to sign, after the label sells what they have I can take my music to someone else and do what I want with it because I still own all the songs.
2013-02-20 10:14:05 AM  
2 votes:
Saw this yesterday, interesting read.
I've heard horror stories about bands getting "Signed", then learning that they have to almost pay the company, so they try to leave, except now the company owns the band's name and its songs. Scary sh*t.

Go subscribe to a guy named Bob Lefsetz. He writes a daily/weekly coloumn and sends it via email. I have no idea how he gets paid, but he's a friggin genius. Almost 60 yrs old and he gets it. Hates record companies, and knows that you DON'T NEED them anymore to make it. YouTube is the new promoter and music delivery service. Radio hasn't been it for years (not a stab at radio, it just isn't for 'new' music anymore. Radio is now a product of success, not an avenue to it).
2013-02-20 10:03:38 AM  
2 votes:
I don't think Lars Ulrich is a douche.
2013-02-20 01:35:58 PM  
1 votes:

verbaltoxin: I'm in two bands at the moment, and I have no interest in either of them getting signed. We all have jobs. Music is purely passion for us. We're going to distribute online and perform live shows. We'll pocket whatever comes out of that minus costs.


The funny thing about the term "we" when you use it in reference to a band is that not everyone will always be on the same page.

In the early 2000's I joined a band, made a demo and it got some airplay.  We had interest from a management company to record a full length album with a 20k budget if we signed exclusively to them to shop it around to labels.

"We" thought it seemed like a pretty good idea.  Once the contract was in our hands "we" stopped existing.

My first reaction was to get the contract to a lawyer.  Everyone else was ready to sign that night.

That was when it stopped being "we."

The lawyer told me the implications of what would happen if we signed the contract.  In short, we could be on the hook for more than two decades to recoup all costs with nearly criminal amounts of interest if the band failed to live up to damned-near the whim of the management company.  He said it was the worst contract he had seen in over thirty years of working entertainment law.

I walked in to rehearsal with what I had found out and there were three guys putting even more pressure on me to sign what they all knew what a terrible contract.  I spent around $900 to have the lawyer negotiate a good deal for us that would give them a year to shop it around and would leave us with a clean break after a year.

It was never really "we" after that no matter how hard everyone tried for it to be.

The management company didn't like the new contarct but since the basic tracks had already been laid down in good faith they ate the contract and we got to work.

Within three months the head of the company dropped off the map.  We later found he'd been busted for fraud.  During that time he spent hours on the phone with the lead-singer trying to get him to unload the rest of us and go as a solo artist because "we were holding him back."  The recording studio never got paid, the second run of CD's never got made and after a year it was all done.  I got to send a registered letter to a P.O. Box notifying them that we were terminating the agreement.

"We" got to walk away from it all because I had common sense.  Years later I found out they were close to just firing me because they thought my actions were going to sour the deal.  They'd actually tried to set it up so they could get together and sign before I showed up to rehearsal one night.

They had all these dreams of the "record contract" fairy coming down and waving her wand and limos and guitars and gear would just appear.  Considering they were all blue-collar guys I can't begrudge them for wanting better.  But it's just something to think about when you use the term "we" in reference to a band; at best it can only represent a span of unknown time.
2013-02-20 01:16:47 PM  
1 votes:

abigsmurf: sure haven't: I've heard horror stories about bands getting "Signed", then learning that they have to almost pay the company, so they try to leave, except now the company owns the band's name and its songs. Scary sh*t.

Lots of Naive/poorly advised acts get their $500,000 advance and think it's a signing on fee rather than royalties up front. They want to change labels after their first album only to be told that they hadn't earnt $500k in royalties yet so would need to pay back some of their advance to leave.

I've read quite a few articles saying this is an example of how evil record companies are when really its just people not knowing what an advance is.


I work in book publishing.  You might know that we're the industry where advances pretty much originated, or at least where they became most commonplace and widespread, and they're still given all the time.

What the record labels call an advance is a farking joke and also, in my opinion, it's evil bull crap that our society shouldn't put up with.

Instead of fronting advance money to the author/artist and then putting more money into production and then splitting the profits like we do, record company "advances" are loans to musicians that they have to pay all of their own production and marketing costs out of, and then the record labels pay them a smaller share of profit split than book publishers do.

Also, in book publishing, you keep the money in the advance even if the book doesn't make back that amount in royalties.  If it falls short, the publishing company takes the loss (as well as the loss on the production costs, which are usually a lot more).  That encourages the publisher to make a bigger effort on the part of marketing the book because if it doesn't sell they won't make money either.

What the record companies do should be illegal.  It's basically robbing artists and calling it an "industry."
2013-02-20 01:09:15 PM  
1 votes:

sure haven't: Saw this yesterday, interesting read.
I've heard horror stories about bands getting "Signed", then learning that they have to almost pay the company, so they try to leave, except now the company owns the band's name and its songs. Scary sh*t.
.


The life and premature death of Mary's Danish

/one of my favorite "could have been huge" bands of the early 90's
2013-02-20 11:29:27 AM  
1 votes:
Nope -- for the most part, the artist doesn't make shiat from record sales. Not only can the label wind up keeping all of the profits on even an album that goes platinum, but the band can actually wind up deeply in debt to the label.


Exactly ^^^THIS^^^

I did my semester project on the recording industry in my Media Concepts class. The artists get screwed. The advance isn't some kind of pre-signing bonus, it's just what it says-and advance, so they get billed for that. They also have to pay for the studio time, the promotion of their album(Advertising, posters, commercial, etc.), and they have to pay for the pressing of their own music. The industry doesn't end up on the hook for anything. I used to have a link to a webpage that broke it down beautifully, using a mythical new band as an illustration of the issue. The RIAA farks these people, and doesn't even give them a towel to clean up with after it's over.
2013-02-20 11:02:42 AM  
1 votes:

Champion of the Sun: You'd think that artists would make their own distribution company to get around this.  There's already a billion record labels owned by rappers to feed the distribution companies.  Wasn't United Artists created to combat this kind of thing in the movie industry?  You'd think money grubbers like Bono or Jagger would've tried to start something up


The record label stuff is the worst.  Young bands have this goal of getting "signed".  Which is in reality a high interest loan.  The label wants a piece of EVERYTHING.

Want to do a guest slot on your buddy's CD?  Even if they're a local act that MIGHT sell a few thousand copies?  Better do it anonymously, because the 360 deal you(r band) signed gives the label a cut.

Band breaks up?  Doesn't matter, the label STILL gets  a cut of whatever you end up doing because of the deal you signed.

It used to be that bands made money touring and selling merch.  Now, you can't get signed to a big record contract without signing away slices of that stuff, too.

This will be the end of big record companies.  The playing field is getting level, and self-distribution is becoming more common.  Or, you foot the bill with your own money up front, or give the studio/producer a few percentage points, and the label's function is merely distribution, not total ownership of your art.  Or, you hire a licensing group to get you paid for using your self-produced song in a video game or movie, and use THAT money as seed money to produce the rest of your album.

Record labels are the real criminals in all this.
2013-02-20 10:53:08 AM  
1 votes:
You'd think that artists would make their own distribution company to get around this.  There's already a billion record labels owned by rappers to feed the distribution companies.  Wasn't United Artists created to combat this kind of thing in the movie industry?  You'd think money grubbers like Bono or Jagger would've tried to start something up
2013-02-20 10:51:31 AM  
1 votes:

sure haven't: Hard truth: Fark is not an accurate sample of what people think of music and FM radio.


Thank you for saying that.

We don't play Nickelback because all the "wacky DJs" LOVE them some Nickelback.  It is because the general public does.  If they didn't sell millions of albums and sell out arenas left and right, then we wouldn't play them as much.

Black folks are even worse.  I've known black record store owners.  Customers literally come in and ASK what's charting, and the answer steers their purchase.

But, this thread will devolve into HURRR DURR CLEARCHANNEL HURR DURR NICKELBACK by this afternoon.
2013-02-20 10:42:49 AM  
1 votes:

dc0012c: sure haven't: Radio hasn't been it for years (not a stab at radio, it just isn't for 'new' music anymore. Radio is now a product of success, not an avenue to it).

I'd agree for most radio, but the diversity of Sirius/XM is an exception. I've heard some awesome tunes on Alt Nation, Underground Garage, and The Coffeehouse from obscure bands that now have a place in my iTunes collection. I agree that self-promotion & publication is king and that labels are going the way of the dodo, but satellite radio seems to be more of a willing participant than just a series of commercials with some songs tossed in. I know it's still not easy to get on Sirius, but certainly easier than the business of bullish*t that terrestrial radio has become.


Actually yeah I'd agree with that, they have a ton of 'signals', whereas FM radio has to get it right. And the reason they don't play that unknown or un'proven' music, is because no one listens. They try to play "new" music, and it fails in the ratings. Hard truth: Fark is not an accurate sample of what people think of music and FM radio.
2013-02-20 10:25:27 AM  
1 votes:

sure haven't: I've heard horror stories about bands getting "Signed", then learning that they have to almost pay the company, so they try to leave, except now the company owns the band's name and its songs. Scary sh*t.


Lots of Naive/poorly advised acts get their $500,000 advance and think it's a signing on fee rather than royalties up front. They want to change labels after their first album only to be told that they hadn't earnt $500k in royalties yet so would need to pay back some of their advance to leave.

I've read quite a few articles saying this is an example of how evil record companies are when really its just people not knowing what an advance is.
2013-02-20 10:19:30 AM  
1 votes:

busy chillin': nice link to the second page, subby, kinda made that suck


randroid: Hey guys, I've got a great idea! Let's link the last page of a multi-page thing!


Obiwontaun: For a second there I thought I had blacked out and forgot about reading the first page


My understanding is people do this because someone has already tried to link the first page and it was red-lighted. Who knows why. Who knows what twisted reason lurks in the hearts of Fark moderators. Bent and twisted in ash and shadow. We will never know.
But that's why people link second/third pages, etc.
2013-02-20 10:02:56 AM  
1 votes:
It's widely known you get very little royalties for recording a pop album.

If you want the big chunk of royalties from releasing an album, you'll need to write your own music. If you're just singing someone else's music, you're little more than just another instrument (why should you get royalties and not the backing singers and studio guitarists?).

Do concerts, release merchandise, (ghost)write your autobiography, work for the money and don't expect it to roll in after releasing an album.
 
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