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(Cracked)   Five things record labels don't want you to know. Also, Lars Ulrich is still a douche (but you already knew that)   (cracked.com) divider line 104
    More: Asinine, Lars Ulrich, record labels, MS Paint, douche bags, airplay, Nielsen SoundScan, bikini models, Carly Rae Jepsen  
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13120 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 20 Feb 2013 at 9:50 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-20 01:58:01 PM

devilEther: I thought Lars Ulrich was highly likable in the Monster documentary. He seems like he would be fun to hang out with and I think his drumming is very creative. Just wanted you all to know how I felt.


It actually is a really interesting documentary, even if you don't like Metallica.  In the end they are just people, each with their own lives and problems.
 
2013-02-20 02:04:36 PM

FirstNationalBastard: abigsmurf: sure haven't: I've heard horror stories about bands getting "Signed", then learning that they have to almost pay the company, so they try to leave, except now the company owns the band's name and its songs. Scary sh*t.

Lots of Naive/poorly advised acts get their $500,000 advance and think it's a signing on fee rather than royalties up front. They want to change labels after their first album only to be told that they hadn't earnt $500k in royalties yet so would need to pay back some of their advance to leave.

I've read quite a few articles saying this is an example of how evil record companies are when really its just people not knowing what an advance is.

When Jewel was on Stern a couple weeks back, she explained that exact deal was why she wound up going with whatever record company she wound up with, for a much lower dollar amount upfront, than to take an astronomical advance she may never make back.


If you like Jewel, you'll love this...

Warning! Wal-Mart propoganda:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=At7UvjzqioE
 
2013-02-20 02:09:31 PM

busy chillin': nice link to the second page, subby, kinda made that suck


It was a cracked link, it was bound to suck....and also spread a 5 item list across 2 pages.
 
2013-02-20 02:19:31 PM

dr.zaeus: FirstNationalBastard: abigsmurf: sure haven't: I've heard horror stories about bands getting "Signed", then learning that they have to almost pay the company, so they try to leave, except now the company owns the band's name and its songs. Scary sh*t.

Lots of Naive/poorly advised acts get their $500,000 advance and think it's a signing on fee rather than royalties up front. They want to change labels after their first album only to be told that they hadn't earnt $500k in royalties yet so would need to pay back some of their advance to leave.

I've read quite a few articles saying this is an example of how evil record companies are when really its just people not knowing what an advance is.

When Jewel was on Stern a couple weeks back, she explained that exact deal was why she wound up going with whatever record company she wound up with, for a much lower dollar amount upfront, than to take an astronomical advance she may never make back.

If you like Jewel, you'll love this...

Warning! Wal-Mart propoganda:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=At7UvjzqioE


No, I listen to Stern.

I didn't know Jewel had gone so far...
 
2013-02-20 02:35:57 PM

Mugato: Photoshop, anyone?

[i.crackedcdn.com image 220x320]


i975.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-20 02:41:38 PM

FirstNationalBastard: Generally, I'm someone who likes owning a hard copy of something... music, TV, movies, whatever, and have no problem paying for it.

But, fark the RIAA and the music industry. Artists see virtually nothing from album sales, so don't feel too bad about buying used, or just downloading music for free. Go see a live show by your favorite artists, instead. That's where they actually see money for their work, and the record companies aren't pocketing 99.9% of the profits.



Actually, if you pay to download a song, the songwriter gets about nine cents (.091).  That's assuming there was no cap, it was under 5:00, and they were the only writer.  If it's over 5:00 they get more and if there were more writers they split the total (again, assuming no special conditions).

If you buy the whole album they get the same amount per song, assuming no special conditions like going over cap (such as when you agree we only have to pay for something like 12 songs but record 13 songs to make the product more attractive to a buyer, or you provide only 12 songs but some are at a long song rate) (assuming none are repeats and/or you contractually stipulated payment for second use).

If they are also the performer they likely get paid a performance rate as well, but I only know about publisher royalties (aka, writer royalties) and if you go over your cap there may be excess charge backs there.

/oh, and getting a kick, yada, yada...
 
2013-02-20 02:58:36 PM
The album Shaming of the True by Kevin Gilbert is an excellent story about these kind of shenanigans.
 
2013-02-20 03:13:48 PM
Still can't believe Lars (who is a mega-douche) dated this woman.
content9.flixster.com
 
2013-02-20 03:26:16 PM

PanicAttack: Still can't believe Lars (who is a mega-douche) dated this woman.
[content9.flixster.com image 462x260]


Reminds me of "Get him to the Greek".
 
2013-02-20 04:02:12 PM
Obviously the rest of us Rush fans are ignoring this thread, because I figured someone would've seen "Loudness War" and immediately thought of  Vapor Trails by now.  It's the frickin' hallmark of the failure of the loudness wars.
 
2013-02-20 04:14:10 PM

FriarReb98: Obviously the rest of us Rush fans are ignoring this thread, because I figured someone would've seen "Loudness War" and immediately thought of  Vapor Trails by now.  It's the frickin' hallmark of the failure of the loudness wars.


That's very true, though Death Magnetic is dangerously close if not in the same ballpark of horrid loudness.
 
2013-02-20 04:19:44 PM
K.B.O. Winston:
Actually, if you pay to download a song, the songwriter gets about nine cents (.091). That's assuming there was no cap, it was under 5:00, and they were the only writer. If it's over 5:00 they get more and if there were more writers they split the total (again, assuming no special conditions).

That's also assuming it went through a record company.

If you write, perform, and record the song yourself, you get about 65 percent of the price (from Apple, for example). That amount was so alien to the record companies when Apple came out with iTunes, many of them literally would not believe it was true - they all insisted that there would be huge hidden fees and costs to bring the artists' cut to record-industry prices.

Of course, the folks who still go through record producers still get the old, tiny percentages, but a lot of folks are finding out that's no longer necessary.
 
2013-02-20 04:34:08 PM

gunther_bumpass: Mugato: Photoshop, anyone?

[i.crackedcdn.com image 220x320]

[i975.photobucket.com image 220x320]


Do you have the original?
 
2013-02-20 04:34:11 PM
 
2013-02-20 04:39:04 PM

Robo Beat: I thought this link was obligatory for music industry threads.


Or this one

/bonus: the only time in recorded history that Courtney Love has been insightful and coherent.
 
2013-02-20 04:44:52 PM

FirstNationalBastard: Generally, I'm someone who likes owning a hard copy of something... music, TV, movies, whatever, and have no problem paying for it.

But, fark the RIAA and the music industry. Artists see virtually nothing from album sales, so don't feel too bad about buying used, or just downloading music for free. Go see a live show by your favorite artists, instead. That's where they actually see money for their work, and the record companies aren't pocketing 99.9% of the profits.

/again, fark the RIAA.


Just don't wear the shirt of the band you are going to see.  Don't be that guy!
 
2013-02-20 04:51:48 PM

Skarekrough: verbaltoxin: I'm in two bands at the moment, and I have no interest in either of them getting signed. We all have jobs. Music is purely passion for us. We're going to distribute online and perform live shows. We'll pocket whatever comes out of that minus costs.

The funny thing about the term "we" when you use it in reference to a band is that not everyone will always be on the same page.

In the early 2000's I joined a band, made a demo and it got some airplay.  We had interest from a management company to record a full length album with a 20k budget if we signed exclusively to them to shop it around to labels.

"We" thought it seemed like a pretty good idea.  Once the contract was in our hands "we" stopped existing.

My first reaction was to get the contract to a lawyer.  Everyone else was ready to sign that night.

That was when it stopped being "we."

The lawyer told me the implications of what would happen if we signed the contract.  In short, we could be on the hook for more than two decades to recoup all costs with nearly criminal amounts of interest if the band failed to live up to damned-near the whim of the management company.  He said it was the worst contract he had seen in over thirty years of working entertainment law.

I walked in to rehearsal with what I had found out and there were three guys putting even more pressure on me to sign what they all knew what a terrible contract.  I spent around $900 to have the lawyer negotiate a good deal for us that would give them a year to shop it around and would leave us with a clean break after a year.

It was never really "we" after that no matter how hard everyone tried for it to be.

The management company didn't like the new contarct but since the basic tracks had already been laid down in good faith they ate the contract and we got to work.

Within three months the head of the company dropped off the map.  We later found he'd been busted for fraud.  During that time he spent hours on the phone with the lea ...


Well worth the $900. Sadly, most aspiring musos can't afford to do the same, but they need to figure out a way.  I've seem more than a few bands screwed aside from the story I mentioned above.
 
2013-02-20 05:04:25 PM
So don't buy stuff from them, its pretty simple really.

/What do you call the guy that hangs around with the musicians and lugs  the heavy gear between shows?
//The Drummer.
 
2013-02-20 05:37:24 PM

abigsmurf: sure haven't: I've heard horror stories about bands getting "Signed", then learning that they have to almost pay the company, so they try to leave, except now the company owns the band's name and its songs. Scary sh*t.

Lots of Naive/poorly advised acts get their $500,000 advance and think it's a signing on fee rather than royalties up front. They want to change labels after their first album only to be told that they hadn't earnt $500k in royalties yet so would need to pay back some of their advance to leave.

I've read quite a few articles saying this is an example of how evil record companies are when really its just people not knowing what an advance is.


We are talking about record company accounting, so it takes selling about 10 millions albums to make back the $500,000 advance.
 
kab
2013-02-20 06:11:03 PM

farkeruk: Nowadays, there are people out there like the folk singer Kate Rusby who did the whole thing. She got a following by gigging, and selling CDs to people and built it up via word-of-mouth. You can make a record in your bedroom (or at least, hire a studio that costs very little).


And has been signed to a label since her debut album.. which wasn't recorded in a bedroom.
 
2013-02-20 06:33:08 PM
FirstNationalBastard: Go see a live show by your favorite artists, instead.

Great idea! Oh wait......I live near downtown Los Angeles and ever since Coachella became huge, forget seeing any of the bands that play there locally, due to contract prohibitions. Coachella counts as their "LA/Southern California" show and that especially sucks if Coachella is that band/performers only show west of the Mississippi on their tour itinerary.

I'm a huge fan of Robert Fripp and King Crimson and he/they are the perfect example of why record executives have such shoddy reputations. When KC started, they formed a partnership with their two managers. Within a year, one of those managers left and was replaced by a guy who had no clue about the music business but had money from his family's department store fortune. Within a few more years, the other original guy left and was replaced by a shyster who worked it that KC paid a cut to the management for everything they did. The label has been sold multiple times to multinational corporations who --GASP!-- use a wall of lawyers to prevent paying money due from the 1980's and on.

I can see why Robert Fripp has quit the life of a professional musician.

My favorite record company shenanigans involve things buried in the contract like "returns". That's a relic from the vinyl-only days when, for example, I had to return a Simple Minds album six times before I got a playable copy. All those copies returned? Charged to the band. Sorry Simple Minds!

neritz: They were already doing most of those things, and for a long time. What they were lacking were the connections to be able to go nationwide. Without the label, they would not have been able to get someone like him and him to produce/engineer their next album.

This ^^ Great, I have a little home studio and I'm learning to get good sounds, but there simply is nothing like a perfectly tuned Les Paul with hot pickups going through a Marshall head that sounds great in a great sounding room > a $3000 mic picking up the sound > going through a Neve console with Yamaha monitors > professional mastering, there simply isn't.

I have a friend who made a very good sounding hip-hop album in his bedroom using ProTools and all that, but there's still parts --maybe just handclaps on one song-- that sound like crap because he didn't have the money to have it professionally mastered by a person who is an experienced mastering engineer.
/*sigh* You damn kids on my lawn, will you ever get off it?
 
2013-02-20 07:02:10 PM

Mugato: gunther_bumpass: Mugato: Photoshop, anyone?

[i.crackedcdn.com image 220x320]

[i975.photobucket.com image 220x320]

Do you have the original?


www.holdinoutforahero.org

/get a new meme
 
2013-02-20 07:07:18 PM
the reporting end of music has had some great shady moments.  chief among them, in my eyes, is Garth Brooks.  Before he released a big double live set years ago, he had them change the way record were counted.  It used to be that record sales were counted Friday to the next Thursday.

however, albums are always released on a Tuesday.  So, when the first week of record sales is so important... you lose the first few days.

Garth had them change, just in time for that record release, the counting to go from Monday to the next Sunday.  This made his album pop up at #1.  Another trick he tried (and this is fine because it was above board) was releasing the album with two covers.   a "collect them all" move.

Another jerk move Garth pulled was he told the guys in Pearl Jam he was going to support their battle against ticketmaster.  He promised to show up the Congress for the hearing, and then backed out.  Many many other artists did the same, which made the arugment weak.  Pearl Jam made their point, but it was voted down.  The thinking of Congress was "if this is such a huge injustice, why are you the only one here".

A funny follow up to that.  Pearl Jam was fighting to keep ticket prices under $10 for that tour.  The last time I saw Pearl Jam, not good seats were $100 each.

So, who is a hero?  Who can stand up to Congress and risk a super bad career move?  John Denver!  he offered to show up for the PMRC hearings.  Everyone assumed he was going to be pro=PMRC... because his music is so PG.  He didn't.  he fought for freedome of speech for his peers.

in closing, I don't care for Garth's music, OR John Denver.  At least we know Denver wasn't a dick, though.
 
2013-02-20 07:11:42 PM
and here is something interesting about the accounting you need to know.  They touch on it in this article, but it is scary stuff.  The average artists gets about 25 cents per CD sold.  Let's say the CD sells for $10.

They (the artist) have to pay for the recording and publicity out of that 25 cents.  So... the $9.75 profit does not go to repay band's costs.  All of that comes out of the band's pockets.  Lisa Left Eye Lopes explained it very eloquently in a behind the music when she was asked how the best selling woman's group in history was completely broke.

same thing they said about Lyle Lovett not seeing a penny for any work he has done.  This, I think, is why there was so little outcry about people stealing music.  The artist would rather not make that 25 cents off you, but have you go and see them in concert for $50 a head because you loved their bootleg CD your friend made for you.

I am not justifying it... just explaining it.
 
2013-02-20 07:11:58 PM
The Baron:

So, who is a hero?  Who can stand up to Congress and risk a super bad career move?  John Denver!  he offered to show up for the PMRC hearings.  Everyone assumed he was going to be pro=PMRC... because his music is so PG.  He didn't.  he fought for freedome of speech for his peers.

in closing, I don't care for Garth's music, OR John Denver.  At least we know Denver wasn't a dick, though.


Weren't John Denver and Frank Zappa unlikely allies during the PMRC hearings?
 
2013-02-20 07:12:41 PM
That's not even the start of it.

I work for a venue out here in Vegas and the promotion group I am with is trying to promote local and independent artists.

... until the owner of the venue reached out to me and calmly explained that I had to cancel my next show because the major labels were each sending the venue a 2,000 dollar bill because the artist in the upcoming show was not signed to any of them, and apparently the contract with the venue provides their jukebox/dj/cover/karaoke license at the cost of a non-competition agreement of sorts.

It is, literally, racketeering, and collusion, and is so incredibly farked up, unethical, and anticapitalist that it pisses me off every time I think about it.
 
2013-02-20 07:20:18 PM
The Baron:

So, who is a hero?  Who can stand up to Congress and risk a super bad career move?  John Denver!  he offered to show up for the PMRC hearings.  Everyone assumed he was going to be pro=PMRC... because his music is so PG.  He didn't.  he fought for freedome of speech for his peers.

in closing, I don't care for Garth's music, OR John Denver.  At least we know Denver wasn't a dick, though.


Ya considering the government in 1973 trying to crack down on drugs, the FFC was asking radio to not play "Rocky Mountain High".
 
2013-02-20 07:22:35 PM
@ firstnationalbastard - Yes, they were unlikely allies.  But, we knew Frank was going to be pro- freedom of speech.  You have seen his lyrics, there was no surprise what team he was on.  When Denver showed up, no one knew what team he was on.  I think Dee Snider even had rebuttals ready and planned to attack Denver... expecting him to attack them.

but John Denver, mister nice guy himself, coming out to say artists should be able to say whatever they want?  That was about as expected as Mister Rogers coming to the defense of 2 Live crew.

What was fun about those hearings is how alarmingly cogent and articulate Dee Snider and Frank Zappa were.  Congress expected dumb ass wasted half wit rock stars and got quite the opposite.  How great was it when Dee had to explain what SMF stood for in his fan club "it was the sick mother**** fans of Twister Sister".
 
2013-02-20 07:35:30 PM

The Baron: @ firstnationalbastard - Yes, they were unlikely allies.  But, we knew Frank was going to be pro- freedom of speech.  You have seen his lyrics, there was no surprise what team he was on.  When Denver showed up, no one knew what team he was on.  I think Dee Snider even had rebuttals ready and planned to attack Denver... expecting him to attack them.

but John Denver, mister nice guy himself, coming out to say artists should be able to say whatever they want?  That was about as expected as Mister Rogers coming to the defense of 2 Live crew.

What was fun about those hearings is how alarmingly cogent and articulate Dee Snider and Frank Zappa were.  Congress expected dumb ass wasted half wit rock stars and got quite the opposite.  How great was it when Dee had to explain what SMF stood for in his fan club "it was the sick mother**** fans of Twister Sister".



I saw a interview with him on those meetings. It was hilarious watching him explain how they all expected him to be a drugged out loser who they were going to steamroll and he just DEMOLISHED all of them.
 
2013-02-20 07:43:01 PM

The Baron: but John Denver, mister nice guy himself, coming out to say artists should be able to say whatever they want? That was about as expected as Mister Rogers coming to the defense of 2 Live crew.


There was a VH1 made for TV movie about the incident.  Zappa and Snyder saw Denver talking to some NASA guys about going up in the shuttle, and they though Denver was gonna sink their argument.  Then Denver got up and demolished the people who wanted to censor music.  Pretty funny scene, probably apocryphal at Denver talking to the NASA guys.  Zappa was probably too big an asshole to hang with Snyder too.
 
kab
2013-02-20 07:43:18 PM
As someone who's releasing a 100% self-financed album in mid-March, I'm getting a kick out of this thread.
 
2013-02-20 07:44:29 PM

sure haven't: Saw this yesterday, interesting read.
I've heard horror stories about bands getting "Signed", then learning that they have to almost pay the company, so they try to leave, except now the company owns the band's name and its songs. Scary sh*t.

Go subscribe to a guy named Bob Lefsetz. He writes a daily/weekly coloumn and sends it via email. I have no idea how he gets paid, but he's a friggin genius. Almost 60 yrs old and he gets it. Hates record companies, and knows that you DON'T NEED them anymore to make it. YouTube is the new promoter and music delivery service. Radio hasn't been it for years (not a stab at radio, it just isn't for 'new' music anymore. Radio is now a product of success, not an avenue to it).


Radio exists to sell ads and only ads.  It hasn't meant much to music for at least 25 years.
 
2013-02-20 07:44:29 PM
On a somewhat related topic, rumor has it that Saul Zaentz is unable to physically articulate musical rhythms...
 
kab
2013-02-20 07:45:32 PM

Leishu: It is, literally, racketeering, and collusion, and is so incredibly farked up, unethical, and anticapitalist that it pisses me off every time I think about it.


What blows my mind is the clubs that are apparently still in existence that charge the bands to play there, nevermind paying them anything after the fact.
 
2013-02-20 07:50:27 PM

bump: On a somewhat related topic, rumor has it that Saul Zaentz is unable to physically articulate musical rhythms...


However, he is very good at screwing musicians out of their own songs, and suing them when they put out a song that sounds like it may have a couple of the same chords in it.

/but that's not a very catchy title for a song.
 
2013-02-20 08:43:01 PM
@ Leishu - true.  The business side of music absolutely sucks all the way down to the street level.  I am in a working rock band in Denver, Co.  I get bar managers who tell me if we can bring in 30 people to drink (think 30 people spending $30 each)... that is a grand.  He will pay us $200.

I got another guy who has been pretty good to us, but expects us to bring in 30 people and we get a 45 minute set.  Do you know how much crap you have to load as a rock band to do a 45 minute set?  That is an hour of set up, and an hour of tear down.

Why am I filling your bar, and entertaining?  Thank god we all have regular corporate jobs.  I can't imagine making a living as a musician.

I tell you to learn guitar, it's awesome. I tell you to join a band, it's awesome.  Then, I tell you to get a real job, just like your parents said
 
2013-02-20 08:45:09 PM

23FPB23: sure haven't: Hard truth: Fark is not an accurate sample of what people think of music and FM radio.

Thank you for saying that.

We don't play Nickelback because all the "wacky DJs" LOVE them some Nickelback.  It is because the general public does.  If they didn't sell millions of albums and sell out arenas left and right, then we wouldn't play them as much.

Black folks are even worse.  I've known black record store owners.  Customers literally come in and ASK what's charting, and the answer steers their purchase.

But, this thread will devolve into HURRR DURR CLEARCHANNEL HURR DURR NICKELBACK by this afternoon.


Oh, we all know that 70% of America has severe brain damage. Jersey Shore, Honey Boo Boo, 16 and Pregnant. All HUGE successes that should never have existed, let alone recieved attention. Yet here we are. Wallowing in Nickleback and spray-tanned STDs. People, by and large, are farking stupid.
 
2013-02-20 08:55:29 PM
Lars Ulrich = douche

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-20 08:55:50 PM
Lars isn't a douche.  His complaint was 100% valid.  They were getting robbed blind.  His mistake was being the face of the issue.  That was a PR nightmare.  he should have hidden behind lawyers and lobbyists like everyone else does.

his point, though, was true.  His lyrics are not public domain, or gifts.  That is his day job, and he deserves to be compensated.
 
2013-02-20 09:00:52 PM

buttsmckracken: PanicMan: I don't think Lars Ulrich is a douche.

Nice try, Lars.


snort. GOOD one.

As for payola? I don't know about now, but early/mid 90s? Yep.
 
2013-02-20 09:02:10 PM

randroid: Hey guys, I've got a great idea! Let's link the last page of a multi-page thing!

That's because someone else posted the first page of the multi-page thing and it didn't get green-lit. What do? Keep submitting pages until someone greenlights it, of course!
Proof:

Holy jumpin' Jesus! Things are all farked up! Bad kitty!!This link was already submitted (by someone else), most recently about 1 day ago ... and was not listed.Link submission thingee
 
2013-02-20 10:06:03 PM

PanicMan: I don't think Lars Ulrich is a douche.


You're right, he's more of a leaky colostomy bag attached to someone who lives on a diet of cheap beer, cheese, eggs, and jalapeños.
 
2013-02-20 10:40:59 PM

Macular Degenerate: randroid: Hey guys, I've got a great idea! Let's link the last page of a multi-page thing!
That's because someone else posted the first page of the multi-page thing and it didn't get green-lit. What do? Keep submitting pages until someone greenlights it, of course!
Proof:

Holy jumpin' Jesus! Things are all farked up! Bad kitty!!This link was already submitted (by someone else), most recently about 1 day ago ... and was not listed.Link submission thingee


That's only what you do if you don't know to add a "?" and some text at the end of the link to the first page so you can submit it with your own headline... Such as:
http://www.cracked.com/article_20256_5-things-record-labels-dont-wan t- you-to-know-they-do.html?whodoesntknowhowtodothis
 
2013-02-20 10:52:35 PM

peewinkle: kroonermanblack: peewinkle: This is a decent, quick synopsis of the record industry today, although it didn't discuss the internet platform. It still points out some of the key points of what's wrong; my main gripe being the Loudness Wars, which began 20 years ago (It just gets worse as it we go along, cite the point from TFA regarding the Metallica album). I also used to run a small Indy label 20 years ago, I released 36 vinyl record by different bands, was able to make just enough to fund the next project kind of thing.  Once people could DL music, I was out within a year.
The whole game has already changed, the current record industry are just trying to hold on and the probably will... for awhile.  But now any Hesher can now record an album on their iMac in their bedroom and that's not necessarily a good thing either.  I have to now double check all of my final mixes for 128bps mp3 because that's how 30-50% of people are going to listen to it.  And it always sounds like garbage.  Dre's Beats are popular because they compensate for this.
I just had a client send a long-term recording project I engineered/co-produced over six months to the mastering house and they just applied the generic smash and bash Loudness sound to it; I'm still upset.
/ex pro-musician/A&R rep
//current studio owner/engineer
///always have YOUR lawyer read a recording deal contract before you sign ANYTHING.

This doesn't make sense to me. You were releasing vinyl up until digital, which suddenly make you obsolete? There was a 10-15 year period of tapes and CDs well before pure digital was practical, were you skipping stuff or using hyperbole?

Also: if I want to buy albums in a way to benefit the artists, what's the way to do that? Since buying doesn't really.

And/or anyone recommend a place to grab tunes free now adays? All the websites I used for .tor have either died, dried up, or have nothing.

I was pressing 500-1000 records for each release, one every 3-4 months.  Some I repressed up t ...


Sorry dude, I'm not trying to be thick. I just can't comprehend how you went straight from vinyl pressings to 'digital killed me' without hitting CDs or anything else, especially since vinyl has been resurging something crazy the last 3-5 years?
 
2013-02-20 11:12:01 PM

buttsmckracken: PanicMan: I don't think Lars Ulrich is a douche.

Nice try, Lars.


Not counting Ron McGovney, who doesn't account for anything really in Metallica's history, I count a total of seven musicians. Burton, Newsted, and Hammett are the only three that don't strike me as douchebags. Lars is quite possibly the biggest twat in all of music.
 
2013-02-21 12:30:39 AM

The Baron: @ Leishu - true.  The business side of music absolutely sucks all the way down to the street level.  I am in a working rock band in Denver, Co.  I get bar managers who tell me if we can bring in 30 people to drink (think 30 people spending $30 each)... that is a grand.  He will pay us $200.

I got another guy who has been pretty good to us, but expects us to bring in 30 people and we get a 45 minute set.  Do you know how much crap you have to load as a rock band to do a 45 minute set?  That is an hour of set up, and an hour of tear down.

Why am I filling your bar, and entertaining?  Thank god we all have regular corporate jobs.  I can't imagine making a living as a musician.

I tell you to learn guitar, it's awesome. I tell you to join a band, it's awesome.  Then, I tell you to get a real job, just like your parents said


I cannot imagine what kind of band you are in that it takes you and hour to set up your gear for a small enough stage that you only need to bring in 30 people to please the club owner. I guess it isn't punk rock.
 
2013-02-21 12:33:54 AM
kroonermanblack:

It was quick and it hurt. I had my last batch printed up in 1999.

Sorry I'm not rough enough\tough enough.
 
2013-02-21 12:44:07 AM
this guy nailed it right here.


Radio exists to sell ads and only ads.  It hasn't meant much to music for at least 25 years.

homerun.  close the thread.  conversation over.  That is why I just listen to podcasts these days.  It is the last bastion of free speech and great conversation.  As for music, use Pandora (NOT I heart radio.  I heart radio is a Clear Channel app)
 
2013-02-21 04:35:47 AM
Magnatune
 
2013-02-21 06:13:02 AM
One of the worst stories about the record industry involves the Bay City Rollers. 25 years, more than 70 million albums sold, one royalty payment (their advance) of $254,000. Sony (Arista) "lost" the original contract and "claimed not to know who to pay."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/entertainment/6473877.stm
 
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