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(Washington Post)   DC Office of Weights and Measures investigators fight to ensure you don't get stiffed by short pours   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 33
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3859 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Feb 2013 at 7:44 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-20 07:45:46 AM  
I'm all for punishing bar owners who deliberately short pour their drinks, but this effort could easily turn the corner and become an investigation into bars that are pouring *too much* alcohol for what's considered a "standard pour." We don't want to go there, people.
 
2013-02-20 07:50:09 AM  
I think the US needs to adopt the European standard of marked glasses. You order 12oz of beer, and you get a glass filled to the standardized by law line.
 
2013-02-20 07:50:40 AM  
I don't really have a problem with the amount of alcohol there. Besides, most places will top it off if you bring it up. My problem is when they cut the beer or liqor ... drinking a cut beverage is friggin' disgusting.

/DNRTFA
 
2013-02-20 07:53:14 AM  
Pretty sure around here any bartender that did that would be run out of town on a rail.
 
2013-02-20 07:53:29 AM  
Waiting for someone to post picture of the Subway sandwich with the tape measure on it.
 
2013-02-20 07:56:05 AM  
I get a couple of rusty nails and by the fourth one, the effing bartender is just putting a drop or two of Drambuie in it.  Bastards
 
2013-02-20 08:02:00 AM  

Pocket Ninja: I'm all for punishing bar owners who deliberately short pour their drinks, but this effort could easily turn the corner and become an investigation into bars that are pouring *too much* alcohol for what's considered a "standard pour." We don't want to go there, people.


I've never had the luxury of that "problem". Bars and clubs are always so crowded, I can't imagine that a random bartender would decide to make any given customer's drink a little stronger. There are exceptions like if you know someone working there.
 
2013-02-20 08:05:01 AM  

HellRaisingHoosier: I don't really have a problem with the amount of alcohol there. Besides, most places will top it off if you bring it up. My problem is when they cut the beer or liqor ... drinking a cut beverage is friggin' disgusting.

/DNRTFA



Now that deserves tarring and feathering.
 
2013-02-20 08:09:48 AM  
"It's an unnecessary burden on business owners - we've been through all the regulations and approvals, and we pay a hefty tax margin of 10 percent on our sales."

Yes, how dare the moochers in the District government keep them from cheating their customers.  They should all go Galt (under a Metro train).
 
2013-02-20 08:27:17 AM  
"What about dessert wines?," asked Jamie Smith, general manager of Veritas Wine Bar in Northwest Washington. "We always pour less of those because they're sweet and heavy."

And that's fine. Just don't charge for the amount you're not pouring, asswipe.
 
2013-02-20 08:27:51 AM  
IIRC, Granville Moores (one of the bars mentioned) serves their drinks in mason jars.  It wouldn't surprise me if those jars weren't as large as typical pints, actually.
 
2013-02-20 08:30:46 AM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: "What about dessert wines?," asked Jamie Smith, general manager of Veritas Wine Bar in Northwest Washington. "We always pour less of those because they're sweet and heavy."

And that's fine. Just don't charge for the amount you're not pouring, asswipe.


Other bars in DC (Reef, Churchkey, Jack Rose) spell out on the drinks menu what kind of glass you're getting if it isn't a standard pint (e.g. 10oz Tulip).  That might actually be the requirement
 
2013-02-20 08:33:16 AM  

VRaptor117: I can't imagine that a random bartender would decide to make any given customer's drink a little stronger.


www.hotbloggirls.com

I can.
 
2013-02-20 08:33:30 AM  
What a great job to have though. If they need investigators to make sure the weed in CO and WA is being weighed properly, they should let us know.
 
2013-02-20 08:57:29 AM  
Can't see why any upstanding joint would have a problem with yearly anti-fraud efforts, particularly if no one is getting fined.

I do miss the South Carolina mini-bottles, however. A single Long Island Iced Tea made with all 1.7 oz pours could get an entire sorority buzzed; two, sloppy and topless.
 
2013-02-20 09:42:01 AM  
What about dessert wines?," asked Jamie Smith, general manager of Veritas Wine Bar in Northwest Washington. "We always pour less of those because they're sweet and heavy."

Uhh, sir or ma'am, I'll determine how much dessert wine to drink when you give it to me. What's the logic here? You drink less of it because it's sweet and heavy, so we all should? Stop skimping on the booze, please.
 
2013-02-20 09:45:36 AM  
Are we sure this isn't an Onion article?  Each business decides what they charge for a drink, so it's not like this measuring system can regulate value for the customer.
 
2013-02-20 09:45:57 AM  
That's why I pour my own.

http://eatatcheeky.com/pyob/
 
2013-02-20 09:51:48 AM  

dr.zaeus: That's why I pour my own.

http://eatatcheeky.com/pyob/


The "pour your own" joint around here has a flow meter and charges you by the ounce.

If you do the math, you're paying more to pour your own drink.
 
2013-02-20 10:07:26 AM  
We have the opposite problem in WI.

Often if my wife orders wine here they fill the wine glass up - so it's at least a double portion.

One Mexican restaurant here has 2-for-1's on Tuesdays.  The first time we went there my wife ordered wine and they brought her a water goblet that was at least 12 ounces full.  She assumed that was both her drinks and she was plenty smiley when she finished it - only to have them bring her free one after.  It had to be at least an entire normal bottle of wine between the two glasses.

Too bad we didn't have a baby sitter that night - might have gotten some adventurous loving out of her after she finished the second one.
 
2013-02-20 10:15:05 AM  
There are only a few places around here that give you 16 oz of beer when you buy a pint. Most of the time, it's a pint glass with 12-14 oz in it. The honest places use Imperial pint glasses and give you what you are paying for.
 
2013-02-20 10:47:03 AM  
I prefer a bartender who does real counts when pouring out liquor----I also prefer that they have a stutter when doing said counts
 
2013-02-20 10:50:05 AM  

Sharksfan: We have the opposite problem in WI.

Often if my wife orders wine here they fill the wine glass up - so it's at least a double portion.

One Mexican restaurant here has 2-for-1's on Tuesdays.  The first time we went there my wife ordered wine and they brought her a water goblet that was at least 12 ounces full.  She assumed that was both her drinks and she was plenty smiley when she finished it - only to have them bring her free one after.  It had to be at least an entire normal bottle of wine between the two glasses.

Too bad we didn't have a baby sitter that night - might have gotten some adventurous loving out of her after she finished the second one.


Yep. Nothing better the getting the wife liqueured up, passed out, and then having sex with the baby sitter.
 
2013-02-20 10:50:07 AM  

natazha: There are only a few places around here that give you 16 oz of beer when you buy a pint. Most of the time, it's a pint glass with 12-14 oz in it. The honest places use Imperial pint glasses and give you what you are paying for.


And a lot of those 'pint' glasses are not capable of holding a pint even if filled to overflowing because they're a thicker bottomed, more tapered glass that at maximum can hold 14 oz.
 
2013-02-20 11:02:42 AM  
Know your bartender, and tip them well. I walked into to a local pub by my house. Gave the bartender $10, said I just want whiskey. She brought me back a PINT GLASS full of whiskey. Gave her another $5 and I was good for the night.
 
2013-02-20 11:27:19 AM  
Don't short me on that purple drank, son.
 
2013-02-20 11:38:53 AM  
Headline reminded me of that scene in one of the Karate Kid movies where Ralph discovers a vendor is using weights that appear to be metal, but are actually a lighter substance.
 
2013-02-20 11:57:36 AM  
Every state has these types of weights and measures requirements, but very few spend any money to enforce them (Virginia only has two or three inspectors for the entire state). They check things like gas pumps to make sure a gallon is really a gallon; they check shelf tags in grocery stores to make sure the price on the shelf matches the scan price; they check by-weight items that aren't sold immediately to make sure the weight hasn't been affected by moisture loss; they make sure scales are properly calibrated; etc etc.

Basically they keep people from getting ripped off (stores are never fined if the error is in the customer's favor), but like I said before, there's almost no enforcement.

Regarding the article, most states have definitions of what constitutes a "drink"--X ounces of beer/wine/liquor. Unless otherwise stated, if you buy a drink it has to meet those specific volume requirements. A pitcher has to be XX ounces, a pint has to be YY ounces, etc.
 
2013-02-20 12:04:28 PM  

Teknowaffle: I think the US needs to adopt the European standard of marked glasses. You order 12oz of beer, and you get a glass filled to the standardized by law line.


Yes, by all means, let's have the US lower its standards of all things we do and mimic the way Europeans do things. Then we would be better off. HA!!!!!!

Bite the big one!
 
2013-02-20 01:28:32 PM  

Robo Beat: "It's an unnecessary burden on business owners - we've been through all the regulations and approvals, and we pay a hefty tax margin of 10 percent on our sales."

Yes, how dare the moochers in the District government keep them from cheating their customers.  They should all go Galt (under a Metro train).


Haha I laughed at that line too - more so because consumers pay the 10 percent tax on sales....
 
2013-02-20 04:48:03 PM  

8Fingers: Teknowaffle: I think the US needs to adopt the European standard of marked glasses. You order 12oz of beer, and you get a glass filled to the standardized by law line.

Yes, by all means, let's have the US lower its standards of all things we do and mimic the way Europeans do things. Then we would be better off. HA!!!!!!

Bite the big one!


If we follow the English lead I'm ok with it. Beer is so sacrosanct that they refused to metricize it!
 
2013-02-20 09:15:57 PM  

8Fingers: Teknowaffle: I think the US needs to adopt the European standard of marked glasses. You order 12oz of beer, and you get a glass filled to the standardized by law line.

Yes, by all means, let's have the US lower its standards of all things we do and mimic the way Europeans do things. Then we would be better off. HA!!!!!!

Bite the big one!


I think the Europeans have it right this time though. A pint is a specific amount of beer--16 ounces in the US, 20 ounces in the UK. If I pay for a pint of beer, I should get a pint of beer. The line on the glass makes it obvious to the bartender and customer alike how much beer should be in that glass. Plus, at least on the continent, the line is far enough from the top that there's room for a head on the beer. The line on the famous German Maß is the transition from the dimpled part to the smooth part.

The standard Libbey 16oz pint glass that most American places use looks surprisingly close to full with only 12oz of beer in it. Glasses with thicker walls and bottoms are full with 12-13oz in them. You wouldn't want to pay for 20 gallons of gasoline and get 15, so why is it somehow OK to pay for 16 ounces of beer and get 12?

Mandatory drink sizes are an overreach for sure, but I don't think anyone's proposing that (though, incidentally, bottle sizes for liquor have been regulated by Uncle Sam for decades, which is why you've never seen a 700mL liquor bottle stateside). Bars can sell drinks in whatever size they want--16oz for pale ale, 10oz for a dubbel, 8oz for a barleywine, etc. but they shouldn't be advertising and charging for 16oz and delivering 12.
 
2013-02-20 09:52:16 PM  

saeufer82: 8Fingers: Teknowaffle: I think the US needs to adopt the European standard of marked glasses. You order 12oz of beer, and you get a glass filled to the standardized by law line.

Yes, by all means, let's have the US lower its standards of all things we do and mimic the way Europeans do things. Then we would be better off. HA!!!!!!

Bite the big one!

I think the Europeans have it right this time though. A pint is a specific amount of beer--16 ounces in the US, 20 ounces in the UK. If I pay for a pint of beer, I should get a pint of beer. The line on the glass makes it obvious to the bartender and customer alike how much beer should be in that glass. Plus, at least on the continent, the line is far enough from the top that there's room for a head on the beer. The line on the famous German Maß is the transition from the dimpled part to the smooth part.

The standard Libbey 16oz pint glass that most American places use looks surprisingly close to full with only 12oz of beer in it. Glasses with thicker walls and bottoms are full with 12-13oz in them. You wouldn't want to pay for 20 gallons of gasoline and get 15, so why is it somehow OK to pay for 16 ounces of beer and get 12?

Mandatory drink sizes are an overreach for sure, but I don't think anyone's proposing that (though, incidentally, bottle sizes for liquor have been regulated by Uncle Sam for decades, which is why you've never seen a 700mL liquor bottle stateside). Bars can sell drinks in whatever size they want--16oz for pale ale, 10oz for a dubbel, 8oz for a barleywine, etc. but they shouldn't be advertising and charging for 16oz and delivering 12.


on the continent?

Really?
cue archiebunker_rasbberynoise.mpg
 
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