If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Slate)   Stung: Citizen did you know the FBI has a clandestine cellphone tracking device known as the "Stingray", that's been deployed across the United States for almost two decades   (slate.com) divider line 110
    More: Interesting, FBI, United States, tracking system, cellphone tracking, stingray, Electronic Privacy Information Center, Southern District of Texas, Electronic Privacy  
•       •       •

13889 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Feb 2013 at 2:24 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



110 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2013-02-19 12:57:05 PM  
I dunno, I kinda just assume that if the Feds wanted to violate my rights they'll do it whenever they want.  I don't get a say in any of it and if I biatch about it, I'll end up in jail.
 
2013-02-19 01:02:26 PM  
The whole "expectation of privacy" thing gets cloudy when you're using a BROADCAST DEVICE, but I'm not a lawyer.
 
2013-02-19 01:09:38 PM  

MrBallou: The whole "expectation of privacy" thing gets cloudy when you're using a BROADCAST DEVICE, but I'm not a lawyer.


I don't even get that far.  between the war on drugs and the war on terror, my baseline assumption is that my phones are tapped, my emails are tracked and my bank accounts are monitored by everyone from the DEA to the TSA and beyond.  I just kind of assume I don't have the 4th or 5th amendment to protect me anymore...if the fedgov wants to dig into my life, they'll do it and they'll use it against me.  I don't get to complain, I can't stop it and if I don't like it well...too bad.
 
2013-02-19 01:20:01 PM  

Weaver95: MrBallou: The whole "expectation of privacy" thing gets cloudy when you're using a BROADCAST DEVICE, but I'm not a lawyer.

I don't even get that far.  between the war on drugs and the war on terror, my baseline assumption is that my phones are tapped, my emails are tracked and my bank accounts are monitored by everyone from the DEA to the TSA and beyond.  I just kind of assume I don't have the 4th or 5th amendment to protect me anymore...if the fedgov wants to dig into my life, they'll do it and they'll use it against me.  I don't get to complain, I can't stop it and if I don't like it well...too bad.


Agreed. The panic after 9/11 greased the slippery slope, but we've been on it a long time. I always assume somebody is watching, but I live in DC, so it's almost certainly true.

F*ck Hoover, yes, go ahead.
 
2013-02-19 01:34:34 PM  
As long as they get warrants they're all good. If they don't, good luck using that or any evidence derived from it in court.
 
2013-02-19 01:37:00 PM  

b2theory: As long as they get warrants they're all good. If they don't, good luck using that or any evidence derived from it in court.


oh i'm sure they'll find a way to make it work.
 
2013-02-19 02:30:02 PM  

Weaver95: b2theory: As long as they get warrants they're all good. If they don't, good luck using that or any evidence derived from it in court.

oh i'm sure they'll find a way to make it work.


Likely they'll argue inevitable discovery.
 
Ehh
2013-02-19 02:30:25 PM  

b2theory: As long as they get warrants they're all good. If they don't, good luck using that or any evidence derived from it in court.


You know how those fussy liberal judges in Law and Order toss out the warrant application because scruple, furrowing Jack McCoy's brow? Battlestar Galactica is more realistic.
 
2013-02-19 02:31:10 PM  

Weaver95: b2theory: As long as they get warrants they're all good. If they don't, good luck using that or any evidence derived from it in court.

oh i'm sure they'll find a way to make it work.


Back dating? It's really not that hard.
 
2013-02-19 02:31:49 PM  

Weaver95: b2theory: As long as they get warrants they're all good. If they don't, good luck using that or any evidence derived from it in court.

oh i'm sure they'll find a way to make it work.


we're talking about the same Administration that is gone through legal hurdles to make targeted drone attacks against US civilians legal
 
2013-02-19 02:33:31 PM  
Thus my nick.
 
2013-02-19 02:33:50 PM  
My "smart" phone cost me $9.88 at Wal-Mart and I paid in cash. The card was $22.04, so I was out the door for $30 and change.

These new phones have a 2--year contract at $1700 MINIMUM, and there are service charges on top of that.

They also want an automatic suction pump on your credit card, they get paid whether they deliver service or not.

Screw them.
 
2013-02-19 02:33:50 PM  
The government has been listening in on our telephone conversations, you say?  For decades, you say? Please hold the line wilst I adorn myself in my constipated fictional British detective attire.
 
2013-02-19 02:38:12 PM  

duffblue: Weaver95: b2theory: As long as they get warrants they're all good. If they don't, good luck using that or any evidence derived from it in court.

oh i'm sure they'll find a way to make it work.

we're talking about the same Administration that is gone through legal hurdles to make targeted drone attacks against US civilians legal


Two decades. We're talking about several administrations. Try to keep up.
 
2013-02-19 02:39:09 PM  
I knew about it subby. Some of us listened to Art Bell back in the 90's.
 
2013-02-19 02:39:40 PM  
FBI HQ:
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-19 02:40:01 PM  
Had someone at work who'd read an article on some fringe website that the US was going to start "chipping" people in the very near future, for tracking, amongst other purposes.

I replied: "Why would the gov't spend billions of dollars and risk being seen as an authoritarian overlord when someone behind a desk at the CIA or FBI can locate you to within a few feet of your current location at any time with a few keystrokes, read your email, see who you've been calling, and checking how much cash you've got in the bank while they do it?"
 
2013-02-19 02:40:21 PM  
MrBallou:

I always assume somebody is watching, but I live in DC, so it's almost certainly true.

You're probably not that interesting, and there's a pretty high bar even for the people they *do* watch.

CS,B in point: in the mid-00's I used to be housemate with a guy who had high-level clearance at both State and DOD... He had a habit of picking up strippers who would then move in with us, and after a few weeks they'd get in a screaming argument and run off (usually after stealing something of mine, dammit!)

This cycle happened 3-4 times while I was there. There was never any problem until the day the stripper-du-jour ran off and left a message on his personal cell phone mentioning there was a warrant out for her in another state.

The very next day he was called into the security office and they played the message back to him. When it became clear that he hadn't known stripperella had a warrant on her they dropped the matter.

So yeah... They have *always* had the ability to watch whomever they want. They just don't *care* 99.999999% of the time.
 
2013-02-19 02:42:16 PM  

b2theory: As long as they get warrants they're all good. If they don't, good luck using that or any evidence derived from it in court.


The federal government doesn't need warrants anymore.
 
2013-02-19 02:44:20 PM  

Red Shirt Blues: I knew about it subby. Some of us listened to Art Bell back in the 90's.


I am sorry
 
2013-02-19 02:46:21 PM  

olddinosaur: My "smart" phone cost me $9.88 at Wal-Mart and I paid in cash. The card was $22.04, so I was out the door for $30 and change.

These new phones have a 2--year contract at $1700 MINIMUM, and there are service charges on top of that.

They also want an automatic suction pump on your credit card, they get paid whether they deliver service or not.

Screw them.


i have prepaid and a got a double-minutes tracfone for 10.00 and 400 (800) minutes of time for 80.00 three years ago and haven't paid for a phone since then.  The 'smart' phone providers and their contracts are a major-league shakedown.

If you don't want to be tracked, take the battery out until you need it.
 
2013-02-19 02:46:42 PM  
It's for Federal use, not some local huckster P.D. So unless you're going to do something big, fuggedaboutit. All of you conspiracy theorists, know because they can, doesn't mean anyone cares about you little life. Just sayin' if you stay under the radar, there's no issue. Otherwise...
 
2013-02-19 02:50:44 PM  

MrBallou: when you're using a BROADCAST DEVICE



Not that it matters to the FBI but it's not a broadcast device.
 
2013-02-19 02:50:58 PM  

Cold_Sassy: If you don't want to be tracked, take the battery out until you need it.


Yeah....keep believing that. Have you looked closely at that collar on your dog? But I've said too much already.
 
2013-02-19 02:52:39 PM  

citizenj: Thus my nick.


Hey Josh, how's it going, you still play battlefield?
 
2013-02-19 02:53:09 PM  
Hurr Ron Paul or something...
 
2013-02-19 02:54:08 PM  

grinding_journalist: I replied: "Why would the gov't spend billions of dollars and risk being seen as an authoritarian overlord when someone behind a desk at the CIA or FBI can locate you to within a few feet of your current location at any time with a few keystrokes,


It occurs to me that, as I currently have two phones (work, personal), of which I usually, but not always, carry both -- I could totally screw with that system by randomly changing up which phone I leave behind. I'm like a man with two clocks.
 
2013-02-19 02:57:33 PM  

Red Shirt Blues: Cold_Sassy: If you don't want to be tracked, take the battery out until you need it.

Yeah....keep believing that. Have you looked closely at that collar on your dog? But I've said too much already.


Well then: Link

Knock yourself out.
 
2013-02-19 03:00:20 PM  
www.criticalcommons.org
'The President's Analyst' came out in 1967.
And we're almost there.
 
2013-02-19 03:04:32 PM  

Cold_Sassy: olddinosaur: My "smart" phone cost me $9.88 at Wal-Mart and I paid in cash. The card was $22.04, so I was out the door for $30 and change.

These new phones have a 2--year contract at $1700 MINIMUM, and there are service charges on top of that.

They also want an automatic suction pump on your credit card, they get paid whether they deliver service or not.

Screw them.

i have prepaid and a got a double-minutes tracfone for 10.00 and 400 (800) minutes of time for 80.00 three years ago and haven't paid for a phone since then.  The 'smart' phone providers and their contracts are a major-league shakedown.

If you don't want to be tracked, take the battery out until you need it.


Taking the battery out won't help. You do know that the little accelerometers in smart phones keep them in a low-power "always on" mode, much in the way that self winding watches are powered by you moving around during the course of the day.
 
2013-02-19 03:06:23 PM  

b2theory: As long as they get warrants they're all good. If they don't, good luck using that or any evidence derived from it in court.


Like someone already referenced, you have no expectation of privacy for any transmissions you send out through the air. They'd only need a warrant if they wanted to physically claim your phone, but that's really not necessary since everything can be monitored without possessing it.

The way the handle these sorts of things is to not act on every little thing they hear about, because that would make it obvious to the public, and they'd stop sending private information through those means. They only move on the big things, and tell the media it was an anonymous tip or something, keeping the public oblivious.
 
2013-02-19 03:06:31 PM  

neversubmit: citizenj: Thus my nick.

Hey Josh, how's it going, you still play battlefield?


Nope. Too busy studying for EMC IE and ISMv2.

My brain is leaking luns...
 
2013-02-19 03:07:03 PM  
Why does it seem that the worst haters of the US Government think the Obama administration is the same as what Bush was doing, or that it's comparable to the ultra-conservative warhawk regime of the late 1960s?
 
2013-02-19 03:09:06 PM  

neversubmit: citizenj: Thus my nick.

Hey Josh, how's it going, you still play battlefield?


However, if you want to play a quick online game of Go, I'm down like four flat tires.
 
2013-02-19 03:09:52 PM  
The federal government can kill you with a drone whenever it wants... you think THIS is a big deal?
 
2013-02-19 03:12:06 PM  

Weaver95: I dunno, I kinda just assume that if the Feds wanted to violate my rights they'll do it whenever they want.  I don't get a say in any of it and if I biatch about it, I'll end up in jail.


Kind of how I feel as well.  I hope/assume that I'm insignificant enough that they aren't going to waste any time on me, although I accept that if they wanted to there would be absolutely nothing I could do about it.
 
2013-02-19 03:14:59 PM  

citizenj: neversubmit: citizenj: Thus my nick.

Hey Josh, how's it going, you still play battlefield?

Nope. Too busy studying for EMC IE and ISMv2.

My brain is leaking luns...


No more DJ stuff? Anyway my point is that nicks don't provide the safety they once might have btw do you still have that phone number that ends with 2830?
 
2013-02-19 03:15:51 PM  
This text is now purple:


grinding_journalist: I replied: "Why would the gov't spend billions of dollars and risk being seen as an authoritarian overlord when someone behind a desk at the CIA or FBI can locate you to within a few feet of your current location at any time with a few keystrokes,

It occurs to me that, as I currently have two phones (work, personal), of which I usually, but not always, carry both -- I could totally screw with that system by randomly changing up which phone I leave behind. I'm like a man with two clocks.


I'm pretty sure they can associate two phones with one person of interest and tell if one has moved lately.
Even easier, they just ask Google for your latest location. If you use any of the features of an Android phone and haven't locked it down tight, Google knows where you are all the time. I'm sure Apple is the same way.

And if *THAT* isn't enough, there's the fact that a lot of carriers run CarrierIQ on their phones, which records and uploads what apps you run., what cells you're in, and details on the calls you make.

So all this information has been available in various ways for the asking. Telecoms in particular don't seem to have a problem handing over info to the feds.
 
2013-02-19 03:16:00 PM  
Oh, and you can bet they keep detailed records on as many citizens as possible, for your own safety, of course. Any of you could turn into a terrorist at any moment!
 
2013-02-19 03:16:09 PM  

GanjSmokr: Weaver95: I dunno, I kinda just assume that if the Feds wanted to violate my rights they'll do it whenever they want.  I don't get a say in any of it and if I biatch about it, I'll end up in jail.

Kind of how I feel as well.  I hope/assume that I'm insignificant enough that they aren't going to waste any time on me, although I accept that if they wanted to there would be absolutely nothing I could do about it.


I understand the concerns, but the tech is there.   It's unrealistic not to use it.

If anything, the real concern is making sure that people who do get busted are given a fair trial, and that 4th Amendment rights are still upheld.
 
2013-02-19 03:17:55 PM  
Now if you think you do have rights, one last assignment for you. Next time you're at the computer, get on the Internet, go to Wikipedia. When you get to Wikipedia, in the search field for Wikipedia, I want you to type in "Japanese Americans 1942″ and you'll find out all about your precious farking rights, Okay? All right. You know about it. In 1942, there were 110,000 Japanese American citizens in good standing, law-abiding people who were thrown into internment camps simply because their parents were born in the wrong country. That's all they did wrong. They had no right to a lawyer, no right to a fair trial, no right to a jury of their peers no right to due process of any kind. The only right they had: "Right this way" into the internment camps! Just when these American citizens needed their rights the most, their government took them away! And rights aren't rights if someone can take them away. They're privileges. That's all we've ever had in this country, is a bill of temporary privileges. And if you read the news even badly, you know that every year the list gets shorter and shorter.

-Carlin
 
2013-02-19 03:18:34 PM  

GanjSmokr: Weaver95: I dunno, I kinda just assume that if the Feds wanted to violate my rights they'll do it whenever they want.  I don't get a say in any of it and if I biatch about it, I'll end up in jail.

Kind of how I feel as well.  I hope/assume that I'm insignificant enough that they aren't going to waste any time on me, although I accept that if they wanted to there would be absolutely nothing I could do about it.


that's my one saving grace out of all this crap - my life is boring.  so boring that I actually feel sorry for the poor dumb sonofabiatch who gets to sit down and comb through my cell phone records, text messages and emails.  esp since i'm the sort of person who likes to heavily encrypt his crock pot spaghetti recipe and email to random people i the middle east.  so not only am I boring, but i'm a time sink as well.  oh, and for the record, there is no law against encrypting computer viruses and emailing them as file attachments to blind drop email addresses.
 
2013-02-19 03:18:44 PM  

neversubmit: citizenj: neversubmit: citizenj: Thus my nick.

Hey Josh, how's it going, you still play battlefield?

Nope. Too busy studying for EMC IE and ISMv2.

My brain is leaking luns...

No more DJ stuff? Anyway my point is that nicks don't provide the safety they once might have btw do you still have that phone number that ends with 2830?


That was you? My bad, I'm on a conf call for work. I'll get back to you.

DJ'ing 4/4 at Kasai if you wanna come out.

No, the nick comment was meant as an Orwellian/THX1138 joke.

Citizen J. Just claiming that one now before the gubmint assigns me a different one.
 
2013-02-19 03:26:04 PM  

Weaver95: so boring that I actually feel sorry for the poor dumb sonofabiatch who gets to sit down and comb through my cell phone records, text messages and emails


It's all automated. Feel sorry for the people who had to do it manually in the early days of Project Echelon. None of this is a new development, it's just much more efficient now.
 
2013-02-19 03:26:28 PM  

Ex-Texan: It's for Federal use, not some local huckster P.D. So unless you're going to do something big, fuggedaboutit. All of you conspiracy theorists, know because they can, doesn't mean anyone cares about you little life. Just sayin' if you stay under the radar, there's no issue. Otherwise...


Federal use only?

Aren't you adorable.
 
2013-02-19 03:28:09 PM  

citizenj: neversubmit: citizenj: neversubmit: citizenj: Thus my nick.

Hey Josh, how's it going, you still play battlefield?

Nope. Too busy studying for EMC IE and ISMv2.

My brain is leaking luns...

No more DJ stuff? Anyway my point is that nicks don't provide the safety they once might have btw do you still have that phone number that ends with 2830?

That was you? My bad, I'm on a conf call for work. I'll get back to you.

DJ'ing 4/4 at Kasai if you wanna come out.

No, the nick comment was meant as an Orwellian/THX1138 joke.

Citizen J. Just claiming that one now before the gubmint assigns me a different one.


Sorry I didn't get the joke. That wasn't me on the phone a brief search of open dbs revealed your phone#, name, job, address, privacy is dead. Be safe everyone.
 
2013-02-19 03:28:49 PM  
Stung was great in the eighties.

/Rooooooxannne
 
2013-02-19 03:33:51 PM  

Rude Turnip: Cold_Sassy: olddinosaur: My "smart" phone cost me $9.88 at Wal-Mart and I paid in cash. The card was $22.04, so I was out the door for $30 and change.

These new phones have a 2--year contract at $1700 MINIMUM, and there are service charges on top of that.

They also want an automatic suction pump on your credit card, they get paid whether they deliver service or not.

Screw them.

i have prepaid and a got a double-minutes tracfone for 10.00 and 400 (800) minutes of time for 80.00 three years ago and haven't paid for a phone since then.  The 'smart' phone providers and their contracts are a major-league shakedown.

If you don't want to be tracked, take the battery out until you need it.

Taking the battery out won't help. You do know that the little accelerometers in smart phones keep them in a low-power "always on" mode, much in the way that self winding watches are powered by you moving around during the course of the day.



Heh, it is not a smartphone.  I already said in my Boobies what a hose-job those and their B.S. contracts, taxes and fees are.  I got better things to spend my money on.  (like dogbones and stuff ;)
 
2013-02-19 03:37:49 PM  
I made a snarky post about the TSA and I got a txt from them saying "we'll steal your laptop for that, asshole! And speaking of your asshole, heh heh heh...."
 
2013-02-19 03:45:27 PM  
Does this mean the FBI knows about all of the porn I look at on my phone so I can whack off in the bathroom without my wife knowing?

I'm really worried about this because I am concerned about civil rights and privacy laws and stuff like that.
 
2013-02-19 03:45:38 PM  

grinding_journalist: Had someone at work who'd read an article on some fringe website that the US was going to start "chipping" people in the very near future, for tracking, amongst other purposes.

I replied: "Why would the gov't spend billions of dollars and risk being seen as an authoritarian overlord when someone behind a desk at the CIA or FBI can locate you to within a few feet of your current location at any time with a few keystrokes, read your email, see who you've been calling, and checking how much cash you've got in the bank while they do it?"


I was watching an episode of White Collar with my wife a few weeks ago and there was a scene where an FBI agent looks up someone's credit card, phone, and criminal record history in a minute or two.  She asked me if I thought they could really get all of that info, and I responded that I didn't even think it would take the minute that it did on screen.
 
2013-02-19 03:46:42 PM  

spickus: MrBallou: when you're using a BROADCAST DEVICE

Not that it matters to the FBI but it's not a broadcast device.


I don't want to get into a tech quibble with an expert, which you may be, but doesn't a cell phone emit an RF signal in the microwave range that is omnidirectional (can be detected in any direction with an appropriate receiver)? That's the definition of broadcast I was using.
 
2013-02-19 03:49:14 PM  
Oh I thought they just gave us free ObamaBushphones out of the goodness of their hearts!
 
2013-02-19 03:50:01 PM  

roc6783: grinding_journalist: Had someone at work who'd read an article on some fringe website that the US was going to start "chipping" people in the very near future, for tracking, amongst other purposes.

I replied: "Why would the gov't spend billions of dollars and risk being seen as an authoritarian overlord when someone behind a desk at the CIA or FBI can locate you to within a few feet of your current location at any time with a few keystrokes, read your email, see who you've been calling, and checking how much cash you've got in the bank while they do it?"

I was watching an episode of White Collar with my wife a few weeks ago and there was a scene where an FBI agent looks up someone's credit card, phone, and criminal record history in a minute or two.  She asked me if I thought they could really get all of that info, and I responded that I didn't even think it would take the minute that it did on screen.


That is major hard core dude.

Just some advice - if you ask a cop or an FBI agent if they are a cop, they MUST answer yes. Could be good to know in the future. You never know how close they really are.
 
2013-02-19 03:52:47 PM  

Ex-Texan: It's for Federal use, not some local huckster P.D. So unless you're going to do something big, fuggedaboutit. All of you conspiracy theorists, know because they can, doesn't mean anyone cares about you little life. Just sayin' if you stay under the radar, there's no issue. Otherwise...


TFA:  They shed light on how, far from being a "new" tool used by the authorities to track down targets, Stingray-style technology has been in the hands of the feds since about 1995 (at least). During that time, local and state law enforcement agencies have also been able to borrow the spy equipment in "exceptional circumstances," thanks to an order approved by former FBI Director Louis Freeh.

I don't blame you for your lack of reading comprehension. You did spend some time in Texas.
 
2013-02-19 03:58:40 PM  

b2theory: As long as they get warrants they're all good. If they don't, good luck using that or any evidence derived from it in court.


They can get them rubberstamped en masse by tame judges. "They didn't have a warrant" is no longer a thing.
 
2013-02-19 04:02:47 PM  

This text is now purple: grinding_journalist: I replied: "Why would the gov't spend billions of dollars and risk being seen as an authoritarian overlord when someone behind a desk at the CIA or FBI can locate you to within a few feet of your current location at any time with a few keystrokes,

It occurs to me that, as I currently have two phones (work, personal), of which I usually, but not always, carry both -- I could totally screw with that system by randomly changing up which phone I leave behind. I'm like a man with two clocks.


There was an article a while ago on Fark about a guy who works for/with drug dealers and sets up a rotating schedule of phones and sim cards to prevent/reduce the chance of cops catching one of the phones' data, then tapping it.  i wonder if that would prevent this situation or if these devices completely blow out his business?

Also, this guy doesn't worry about stuff like that, as you're just a prank caller.

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2013-02-19 04:03:00 PM  

maxheck: It occurs to me that, as I currently have two phones (work, personal), of which I usually, but not always, carry both -- I could totally screw with that system by randomly changing up which phone I leave behind. I'm like a man with two clocks.

I'm pretty sure they can associate two phones with one person of interest and tell if one has moved lately.
Even easier, they just ask Google for your latest location. If you use any of the features of an Android phone and haven't locked it down tight, Google knows where you are all the time. I'm sure Apple is the same way.


Sure sure, but which one am I currently using? Which location am I in?

The secret today isn't to try to avoid being a data point at all, it's to become an unreliable data point. They're going to find something. The game is to make that something indecipherable from noise.
 
2013-02-19 04:04:02 PM  
Frankly, I had just sort of assumed.
 
2013-02-19 04:04:21 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: Like someone already referenced, you have no expectation of privacy for any transmissions you send out through the air.


You know, even trivial encryption makes something illegal to break without a warrant.
 
2013-02-19 04:06:09 PM  

I Like Shiny Things: roc6783: grinding_journalist: ***snip***

That is major hard core corps dude.

Just some advice - if you ask a cop or an FBI agent if they are a cop, they MUST answer yes. Could be good to know in the future. You never know how close they really are.


Sorry, pet peeve.

//If you are going to be a douche, at least try to be funny.
 
2013-02-19 04:09:39 PM  

neversubmit: citizenj: neversubmit: citizenj: neversubmit: citizenj: Thus my nick.

Hey Josh, how's it going, you still play battlefield?

Nope. Too busy studying for EMC IE and ISMv2.

My brain is leaking luns...

No more DJ stuff? Anyway my point is that nicks don't provide the safety they once might have btw do you still have that phone number that ends with 2830?

That was you? My bad, I'm on a conf call for work. I'll get back to you.

DJ'ing 4/4 at Kasai if you wanna come out.

No, the nick comment was meant as an Orwellian/THX1138 joke.

Citizen J. Just claiming that one now before the gubmint assigns me a different one.

Sorry I didn't get the joke. That wasn't me on the phone a brief search of open dbs revealed your phone#, name, job, address, privacy is dead. Be safe everyone.


Ah, but you didn't find my topless sexy pics in all their awesomeness....

/i keed, i keed
//besides, ain't no one got time for that.
 
2013-02-19 04:09:59 PM  
What the www1.american.edu has to say about this.

What the farm6.staticflickr.comhas to say about this.

Maybe, if you're worried about "This Sort of Thing™", you can put your money where your mouth is.
 
2013-02-19 04:10:32 PM  
I'm sorry, I lost interest in this story when I saw this headline link next to the article.

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/dear_prudence/2013/02/dear_pruden ce _my_wife_and_i_came_from_the_same_sperm_donor.html

/Wtf?
 
2013-02-19 04:12:29 PM  

Man On Fire: b2theory: As long as they get warrants they're all good. If they don't, good luck using that or any evidence derived from it in court.

They can get them rubberstamped en masse by tame judges. "They didn't have a warrant" is no longer a thing.


It isn't so much that they usually don't have warrants so much as it is what they find is often beyond the scope of a warrant.  For example, a warrant to search a house does not cover their employer's location, other houses, girlfriend's handbag in the trunk of their car in their locked garage.  They have to be pretty specific as to what they're looking for and where.  It can come down to certain rooms.  Also if the defense can go back and ascertain that there was no cause for the initial warrant to be issued, it can be invalidated.  Like if I were an officer and got some stupid judge to give me a warrant to search your house, me and you are both farked when the defense shows up and asks for concrete evidence as to why the warrant was pursued and signed.  It isn't like 'probable cause' where you can just flip open your nightstick and start hitting because you 'smelled marijuana.'

What we need is some way in which judges can be punished for issuing warrants with insufficient evidence, and some way cops can be punished for pursuing warrants with no evidence.  Think about a warrant almost as a mini-trial.  The judge is supposed to look over the evidence and consider risk versus reward.  A suspect selling drugs out of their house which was caught on camera would likely get a warrant issued to search their house, but someone that smelled like marijuana at the mall shouldn't have a warrant issued to search their house even if they turn out to have marijuana on them and get arrested for it.
 
2013-02-19 04:15:31 PM  

This text is now purple: You know, even trivial encryption makes something illegal to break without a warrant.


Which is probably why there's a push to demonize anyone who encrypts their data as potential terrorists.
 
2013-02-19 04:16:18 PM  

roc6783: I Like Shiny Things: roc6783: grinding_journalist: ***snip***

That is major hard core corps dude.

Just some advice - if you ask a cop or an FBI agent if they are a cop, they MUST answer yes. Could be good to know in the future. You never know how close they really are.

Sorry, pet peeve.

//If you are going to be a douche, at least try to be funny.


Dammit. I swear I actually did consider saying corps instead of core but thought it would be too obscure and possibly take away from the real facts at hand - that you are a nancy.

Lesson learned.

/do I just say 'shakes tiny fist' or do I have to post one of those cool meme images.  Not sure of the proper etiquette here
 
2013-02-19 04:19:22 PM  
I think I am just going to start dropping off a stool, urine samples and video of the previous night's masturbation sessions at my local FBI field office each morning.

/problem solved
//"Careful with that one. I had a few Loco Tacos last night after a night of cheap Mexican tequila drinking."
 
2013-02-19 04:21:36 PM  
Forget the FBI, most bigger municipal police departments having been using Stingray for years to locate fugitives. That being said, as long as they get a warrant, who cares?
 
2013-02-19 04:23:01 PM  

MrBallou: I don't want to get into a tech quibble with an expert, which you may be, but doesn't a cell phone emit an RF signal in the microwave range that is omnidirectional (can be detected in any direction with an appropriate receiver)? That's the definition of broadcast I was using.


Actually I'm an amateur and that's why I know the definition of broadcast according to the FCC and the dictionary.

1.To transmit (a radio or television program) for public or general use.

You are specifically prohibited from broadcasting.
 
2013-02-19 04:23:08 PM  

citizenj: neversubmit: citizenj: neversubmit: citizenj: neversubmit: citizenj: Thus my nick.

Hey Josh, how's it going, you still play battlefield?

Nope. Too busy studying for EMC IE and ISMv2.

My brain is leaking luns...

No more DJ stuff? Anyway my point is that nicks don't provide the safety they once might have btw do you still have that phone number that ends with 2830?

That was you? My bad, I'm on a conf call for work. I'll get back to you.

DJ'ing 4/4 at Kasai if you wanna come out.

No, the nick comment was meant as an Orwellian/THX1138 joke.

Citizen J. Just claiming that one now before the gubmint assigns me a different one.

Sorry I didn't get the joke. That wasn't me on the phone a brief search of open dbs revealed your phone#, name, job, address, privacy is dead. Be safe everyone.

Ah, but you didn't find my topless sexy pics in all their awesomeness....

/i keed, i keed
//besides, ain't no one got time for that.


email in profile if you want ;)
 
2013-02-19 04:26:03 PM  
Yawn, and before Stingray there was Triggerfish.  Most cellphone users don't realize that anyone -- not just law enforcement -- can set up a GSM cell site and use it to monitor nearby conversations by posing as part of the network.  This costs a couple thousand bucks at most.

Personally, I miss the days when the network was all analog and TVs went up to channel 83...
 
2013-02-19 04:28:42 PM  

Hrist: It isn't so much that they usually don't have warrants so much as it is what they find is often beyond the scope of a warrant. For example, a warrant to search a house does not cover their employer's location, other houses, girlfriend's handbag in the trunk of their car in their locked garage. They have to be pretty specific as to what they're looking for and where. It can come down to certain rooms. Also if the defense can go back and ascertain that there was no cause for the initial warrant to be issued, it can be invalidated. Like if I were an officer and got some stupid judge to give me a warrant to search your house, me and you are both farked when the defense shows up and asks for concrete evidence as to why the warrant was pursued and signed. It isn't like 'probable cause' where you can just flip open your nightstick and start hitting because you 'smelled marijuana.'


Remember we are talking about Federal law enforcement here. Your post only applies to stuff like state and local.

If the Feds go after you, they get a warrant for everything, because all they need is 5 minutes with a judge that will say "yes" every time, and is on-call to sign 24/7. Wiretaps, home/work/boat, they get paper for everything, because they got burned a few times not doing it right in the 80s and 90s trying to take down drug kingpins.
 
2013-02-19 04:34:13 PM  

I Like Shiny Things: roc6783: I Like Shiny Things: roc6783: grinding_journalist: ***snip***

Dammit. I swear I actually did consider saying corps instead of core but thought it would be too obscure and possibly take away from the real facts at hand - that you are a nancy.

Lesson learned.

/do I just say 'shakes tiny fist' or do I have to post one of those cool meme images.  Not sure of the proper etiquette here


You could post a cool meme image of a tiny fist.  That would do it.
 
2013-02-19 04:49:43 PM  

spickus: MrBallou: I don't want to get into a tech quibble with an expert, which you may be, but doesn't a cell phone emit an RF signal in the microwave range that is omnidirectional (can be detected in any direction with an appropriate receiver)? That's the definition of broadcast I was using.

Actually I'm an amateur and that's why I know the definition of broadcast according to the FCC and the dictionary.

1.To transmit (a radio or television program) for public or general use.

You are specifically prohibited from broadcasting.


There's the difference. I wasn't using the legal (and correct) term. I only meant broadcast, as opposed to tight-beam.

My point was that it's a little like shouting on the street. You don't really have any expectation of control over who hears you.
 
2013-02-19 05:05:04 PM  
Yes. It's why my cell phone account is in your name.
 
2013-02-19 05:08:10 PM  

Red Shirt Blues: I knew about it subby. Some of us listened to Art Bell back in the 90's.


I actually listened to Art Bell when he played it straight, before going all X-Files, tinfoil hats and ghost stories.
/First gulf war period actually.

As to the article, I think the plan all along has been to keep the right focused on the second amendment, the left focused on the first amendment, and while we're all getting all "My precious" about these two, they slowly pull away the rest of the Bill of Rights.
 
2013-02-19 05:12:24 PM  
Someone recently told me that they can watch me through my lcd tv.  I replied 'That is why I watch tv with no pants on, that'll learn 'em.'
 
2013-02-19 05:16:02 PM  
True Story

Best friend's wife works for Lockheed Martin, at the missile factory. 1999, at her Department summer picnic, my pal is down by the lake when he notices a dragonfly following him. Doesn't think much about it, Until he walks back to the picnic and the dragonfly follows him. All day that dragonfly followed him. He mentioned it to spouse and she told him lay off the booze. But ten years later we start seeing these insect sized drone stories.

So, if that was 1999, what are they working on now?
 
2013-02-19 05:31:44 PM  

jim32rr: Red Shirt Blues: I knew about it subby. Some of us listened to Art Bell back in the 90's.

I am sorry


why? back then coast 2 coast was a pretty dang good program & art was a great host

the show has trailed off considerably since then

considerably
 
2013-02-19 05:37:30 PM  
There's a REDACTED near my house that is frequently REDACTED.  It's obvious when REDACTED is being REDACTED because my cell phone goes full strength for a while and then gets stuck in SOS mode until it's rebooted.
 
2013-02-19 05:40:48 PM  
roc6783:You could post a cool meme image of a tiny fist.  That would do it.

                                                 www.dreamwidth.org
 
2013-02-19 05:49:50 PM  
I hear it was for barter only.

www.flickscribe.com
 
2013-02-19 05:58:39 PM  

roc6783: I Like Shiny Things: roc6783: I Like Shiny Things: roc6783: grinding_journalist: ***snip***

Dammit. I swear I actually did consider saying corps instead of core but thought it would be too obscure and possibly take away from the real facts at hand - that you are a nancy.

Lesson learned.

/do I just say 'shakes tiny fist' or do I have to post one of those cool meme images.  Not sure of the proper etiquette here

You could post a cool meme image of a tiny fist.  That would do it.


I really wish you two would keep me out of your shenanigans.
 
2013-02-19 06:01:30 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: b2theory: As long as they get warrants they're all good. If they don't, good luck using that or any evidence derived from it in court.

Like someone already referenced, you have no expectation of privacy for any transmissions you send out through the air. They'd only need a warrant if they wanted to physically claim your phone, but that's really not necessary since everything can be monitored without possessing it.

The way the handle these sorts of things is to not act on every little thing they hear about, because that would make it obvious to the public, and they'd stop sending private information through those means. They only move on the big things, and tell the media it was an anonymous tip or something, keeping the public oblivious.


If you are broadcasting with a Ham radio I would agree with you. If you are on a mobile phone, which are encrypted, you are no longer in the domain of "plain sight".

While I recognize that things have gone off the rails on the national security wire tapping front, the FBI/local law enforcement can't tap you unless they have a warrant related to a criminal investigation. In other words, you may end up at Gitmo but you won't end up in county.
 
2013-02-19 06:22:05 PM  

b2theory: If you are broadcasting with a Ham radio I would agree with you. If you are on a mobile phone, which are encrypted, you are no longer in the domain of "plain sight".


I'm no expert, but there seems to be a thriving industry for applications providing encryption to cellphone users, so i'm guessing it's not standard on your average cellphone.
 
2013-02-19 06:34:28 PM  

spickus: MrBallou: I don't want to get into a tech quibble with an expert, which you may be, but doesn't a cell phone emit an RF signal in the microwave range that is omnidirectional (can be detected in any direction with an appropriate receiver)? That's the definition of broadcast I was using.

Actually I'm an amateur and that's why I know the definition of broadcast according to the FCC and the dictionary.

1.To transmit (a radio or television program) for public or general use.

You are specifically prohibited from broadcasting.


That the law is still on the books suggests that spark-gap transmitters still work as wide-band jammers.

What's handy is that at this point, very few people realize that little lightning generator is a jammer.
 
2013-02-19 06:41:30 PM  

Ex-Texan: It's for Federal use, not some local huckster P.D. So unless you're going to do something big, fuggedaboutit. All of you conspiracy theorists, know because they can, doesn't mean anyone cares about you little life. Just sayin' if you stay under the radar, there's no issue. Otherwise...


Bullshiat.

There is no such thing as 'staying under the radar' especially if you assume that the gov doesn't care.  The thing is, they DO care, they just CAN'T.  When technology catches up and makes ubiquitous surveillance possible, that's when CAN and CARE come together.

But I'm sure that such a system like your's never has any 'uninteresting' person end up on a terror watch or no-fly list.  I'm really looking forward to all the laws which try to tie the no-fly list with a firearm background check purchase denial.
 
2013-02-19 06:42:26 PM  
I'd say TOR, but it'd been developed by the Navy, and it's a pedophile den in the western society, for the most part.
 
2013-02-19 06:46:08 PM  

Weaver95: I dunno, I kinda just assume that if the Feds wanted to violate my rights they'll do it whenever they want.  I don't get a say in any of it and if I biatch about it, I'll end up in jail.


So, basically we're stuck in the worst Cyberpunk novel ever, since:

1.- The government has less power than corporations
2.- The government and the corporations are watching you
3.- We have the technology to make life better, but we're still dicks
4.- Yet... We have no weaponized cyborg limbs, or plasma guns
 
2013-02-19 06:49:08 PM  

Clemkadidlefark: True Story

Best friend's wife works for Lockheed Martin, at the missile factory. 1999, at her Department summer picnic, my pal is down by the lake when he notices a dragonfly following him. Doesn't think much about it, Until he walks back to the picnic and the dragonfly follows him. All day that dragonfly followed him. He mentioned it to spouse and she told him lay off the booze. But ten years later we start seeing these insect sized drone stories.

So, if that was 1999, what are they working on now?


True Story, I used to work at Lockheed Martin.  There are a lot of 'missile factories', no 'the missile factory.'

Also, in 1999 there is no way in hell a dragonfly sized drone could pack enough energy to stay aloft for an entire day.  If you could pack that much energy into something of that size, you could quit your job, fly your dragonfly around Elon Musk's head for an hour and convince him to give you $50 million dollars just to consult.
 
2013-02-19 06:50:52 PM  

inner ted: jim32rr: Red Shirt Blues: I knew about it subby. Some of us listened to Art Bell back in the 90's.

I am sorry

why? back then coast 2 coast was a pretty dang good program & art was a great host

the show has trailed off considerably since then

considerably


I was apologizing for my submission, not for Art Bell's radio show
 
2013-02-19 06:52:17 PM  

This text is now purple: It occurs to me that, as I currently have two phones (work, personal), of which I usually, but not always, carry both -- I could totally screw with that system by randomly changing up which phone I leave behind. I'm like a man with two clocks.


"Ok, one of the phones he regularly carries has been sitting at his home address for the last six hours, the other appears to be moving around town. I just wish we could figure out which one he had on him right now."

Yeah, I don't think it's going to take a super sleuth to figure out where you are.
 
2013-02-19 06:57:54 PM  

kim jong-un: Clemkadidlefark: True Story

Best friend's wife works for Lockheed Martin, at the missile factory. 1999, at her Department summer picnic, my pal is down by the lake when he notices a dragonfly following him. Doesn't think much about it, Until he walks back to the picnic and the dragonfly follows him. All day that dragonfly followed him. He mentioned it to spouse and she told him lay off the booze. But ten years later we start seeing these insect sized drone stories.

So, if that was 1999, what are they working on now?

True Story, I used to work at Lockheed Martin.  There are a lot of 'missile factories', no 'the missile factory.'

Also, in 1999 there is no way in hell a dragonfly sized drone could pack enough energy to stay aloft for an entire day.  If you could pack that much energy into something of that size, you could quit your job, fly your dragonfly around Elon Musk's head for an hour and convince him to give you $50 million dollars just to consult.


Waitaminute. Are you seriously suggesting that between "dragonfly drones with enough oomph to follow someone around all afternoon (a decade ago!)" and "dude got drunk and paranoid and started noticing that while he was at a lake, he didn't have to look long/far to find an identical dragonfly", "dude should lay off the hard stuff" is more likely? Please.
 
2013-02-19 07:08:00 PM  

Cold_Sassy: olddinosaur: My "smart" phone cost me $9.88 at Wal-Mart and I paid in cash. The card was $22.04, so I was out the door for $30 and change.

These new phones have a 2--year contract at $1700 MINIMUM, and there are service charges on top of that.

They also want an automatic suction pump on your credit card, they get paid whether they deliver service or not.

Screw them.

i have prepaid and a got a double-minutes tracfone for 10.00 and 400 (800) minutes of time for 80.00 three years ago and haven't paid for a phone since then.  The 'smart' phone providers and their contracts are a major-league shakedown.



One word, Ting. I'm using a Galaxy SIII and my highest monthly bill has been a tad over $30. Normally it's under $30. They adjust your plan level based on your usage so if you only use the lowest plan level that's what you pay. Next month you send 1000 texts your text plan jumps to that tier. You only pay for what you use. Additional devices are $6.
 
2013-02-19 07:08:35 PM  

Weaver95: GanjSmokr: Weaver95: I dunno, I kinda just assume that if the Feds wanted to violate my rights they'll do it whenever they want.  I don't get a say in any of it and if I biatch about it, I'll end up in jail.

Kind of how I feel as well.  I hope/assume that I'm insignificant enough that they aren't going to waste any time on me, although I accept that if they wanted to there would be absolutely nothing I could do about it.

that's my one saving grace out of all this crap - my life is boring.  so boring that I actually feel sorry for the poor dumb sonofabiatch who gets to sit down and comb through my cell phone records, text messages and emails.  esp since i'm the sort of person who likes to heavily encrypt his crock pot spaghetti recipe and email to random people i the middle east.  so not only am I boring, but i'm a time sink as well.  oh, and for the record, there is no law against encrypting computer viruses and emailing them as file attachments to blind drop email addresses.


There aught'a be; that shiat killed my last computer!
 
2013-02-19 07:24:17 PM  

J. Frank Parnell: b2theory: If you are broadcasting with a Ham radio I would agree with you. If you are on a mobile phone, which are encrypted, you are no longer in the domain of "plain sight".

I'm no expert, but there seems to be a thriving industry for applications providing encryption to cellphone users, so i'm guessing it's not standard on your average cellphone.


Cell phone transmissions are encrypted.  It isn't robust encryption, but it IS there.  The industry surrounding cell phone encryption is an extra layer in which all the pieces are controlled by the transmitter/receiver and no untrusted third parties.  Regardless of that, the concept he is trying to put across is one similar used for first class mail.  An envelope is one of the most primitive technologies you could employ for blocking the letter from 'plain sight', but it is sufficient enough measure that the police can NOT open that letter without a warrant.  It's a simple piece of paper, you might even be able to hold it up to a candle and read the words through the paper, but even doing that would be a violation of a person's rights.

It's trivial, easily circumvented, and provides no guarantee that your message was not read while in transit, but from a legal perspective, it's enough that even the slightest effort was made to conceal the contents to render those contents protected by law.  That's what he is getting at when he mentions plain sight.  It's not much in the way of concealment, but it is sufficient.
 
2013-02-19 07:42:09 PM  
KillerAttackParrot:
One word, Ting. I'm using a Galaxy SIII and my highest monthly bill has been a tad over $30. Normally it's under $30. They adjust your plan level based on your usage so if you only use the lowest plan level that's what you pay. Next month you send 1000 texts your text plan jumps to that tier. You only pay for what you use. Additional devices are $6.

Hey thanks
I've been looking for a reasonable carrier for a family and didn't think one existed. These guys might fit the bill (no pun intended)
 
2013-02-19 07:59:06 PM  
For all you people comfortable in the idea that "you are not that interesting" and that "they don't care about you" I offer you some wisdom given by Arlo Guthrie something like 40 years ago:

During these hard days and hard weeks, everybody always
has it bad once in a while. You know, you have a bad time of
it, and you always have a friend who says "Hey man, you
ain't got it that bad. Look at that guy"; And you look at that
guy, and he's got it worse than you. And it makes you feel
better that there's somebody that's got it worse than you.

But think of the last guy. For one minute, think of the last
guy. Nobody's got it worse than that guy. Nobody in the
whole world. That guy...he's so alone in the world that he
doesn't even have a street to lay in for a truck to run him over.
He's out there with nothin'. Nothin's happenin' for that cat.

And all that he has to do to create a little excitement in his
own life is to bum a dime from somewhere, call up the FBI.
Say "FBl?";, they say "Yes";, say "I think Uncle Ho and Chair-
man Mao and their friends are comin' over for dinner"; (click)
Hang up the phone.

And within two minutes, and not two minutes from when he
hangs up the phone, but two minutes from when he first put
the dime in, they got 30,000 feet of tape rollin'; files on tape;
pictures, movies, dramas, actions on tape. But then they send
out a half a million people all over the entire world, the globe,
they find out all they can about this guy.

'Cause there's a number of questions involved in the guy. I
mean, if he was the last guy in the world, how'd he get a dime
to call the FBI? There are plenty of people that aren't the last
guys that can't get dimes. He comes along and he gets a dime.

I mean, if he had to bum a dime to call the FBI, how was he
gonna serve dinner for all of those people? How could the
last guy make dinner for all those people. And if he could
make dinner, and was gonna make dinner, then why did he
call the FBI?

They find out all of those questions within two minutes. And
that's a great thing about America. I mean, this is the only
country in the world...l mean, well, it's not the only country
in the world that could find stuff out in two minutes, but it's
the only country in the world that would take two minutes
for that guy.

Other countries would say "Hey, he's the last guy...screw
him";, you know? But in America, there is no discrimination,
and there is no hypocrisy,'cause they'll get anybody. And that's
a wonderful thing about America.

And that's why tonight I'd like to dedicate it to every FBI
man in the audience. ...................
 
2013-02-19 08:23:59 PM  

kim jong-un: Cell phone transmissions are encrypted. It isn't robust encryption, but it IS there.


Caused me to do a little research on the matter.

There are many different kinds of cell phones, each with a different security profile. Before you can understand the security of your cell phone, you need to know what kind of cell phone you have.


Analog Cell Phones, also called AMPS (Advanced Mobile Phone System). These were the first cellular telephones. Developed in the 1970s and deployed in the 1980s and still used today. These phones transmit voice as an analog signal without any encryption of scrambling. As a result, they can be eavesdropped upon using handheld scanners sold at places like Radio Shack.Analog systems are widely deployed throughout the US, especially in rural areas. Although analog cell phones are still sold but not a good deal, as analog providers generally charge a lot of money, the phones do not have good battery life, and the sound quality is generally poor. The big advantage of analog cell phones is that they have the best nation-wide coverage, but that's changing fast. If you have an analog cell phone, you probably want to get a new one. (Note: many "dual-mode" digital phones support have analog for roaming in remote areas; roaming fees are sometimes included in a one's monthly plan, but other times they are extra.)


GSM (Global System Mobile, recently renamed Global System for Mobile Communications) is the cell phone system used by most of the world, and increasingly by carriers in the United States. GSM phones usually have a "chip" in them that contains your account number and other information. GSM phones use digital, encrypted communication between your phone and the cellular telephone base station. At the base station your voice is decrypted and sent over the telephone network. Like all digital systems, GSM phones provide substantially more voice privacy than analog systems, but they can still be eavesdropped upon by either the cellular telephone company, the government, or any organization that has access to the telephone network's switching equipment. The GSM encryption algorithm (called A5) can also be cracked by a suitably motivated attacker.


TDMA (Time Division Multiple Access) is the digital telephone standard that was deployed by AT&T in the 1990s. AT&T's telephones had a "voice privacy" or "voice security" setting which enables encryption. Unfortunately, if your turned this feature on, your phone won't work with AT&T's network, because AT&T never enabled the encryption feature in their base stations. As a result, TDMA phones can be eavesdropped upon using a some kinds of digital scanners and "soft radios." In practice, this equipment is not generally available. AT&T is migrating its network to GSM; if you buy an AT&T phone today, you're running GSM.


CDMA (Code Division Multiple Access) is the digital telephone standard that was developed by Qualcomm and deployed by Sprint PCS and by Verizon. CDMA used RC4 encryption but the protocol doesn't keep the keys secret, so in practice CDMA communications can be eavesdropped by a motivated attacker. In practice, though, it's must easier to wiretap a CDMA telephone on the provider's network. Today CDMA is used by the Sprint part of Sprint/Nexteland by Verizon.


iDEN (Integrated Digital Enhanced Network) is a technology developed by Motorola for multiplexing fleet radio systems in the 1980s. This technology was adopted by Fleet Call which renamed itself Nextel. Besides providing digital telephone communications, iDEN has a "push-to-talk" feature that allows the units to be used as if they were a walkie-talkie. It's used by the Nextel part of the Sprint/Nextel network.



From here.
 
2013-02-19 08:24:10 PM  

Red Shirt Blues: I knew about it subby. Some of us listened to Art Bell back in the 90's.


Ditto, though not from Art Bell. I got mine through the standard media.

Howcome these things that always get blamed on TEH EBIL GOVERMINT (by one side or the other) usually come down to "Why weren't you paying attention?" These deep dark secrets are really never very secret, you know.
 
2013-02-19 08:32:24 PM  

maxheck: MrBallou:

I always assume somebody is watching, but I live in DC, so it's almost certainly true.

You're probably not that interesting, and there's a pretty high bar even for the people they *do* watch.

CS,B in point: in the mid-00's I used to be housemate with a guy who had high-level clearance at both State and DOD... He had a habit of picking up strippers who would then move in with us, and after a few weeks they'd get in a screaming argument and run off (usually after stealing something of mine, dammit!)

This cycle happened 3-4 times while I was there. There was never any problem until the day the stripper-du-jour ran off and left a message on his personal cell phone mentioning there was a warrant out for her in another state.

The very next day he was called into the security office and they played the message back to him. When it became clear that he hadn't known stripperella had a warrant on her they dropped the matter.

So yeah... They have *always* had the ability to watch whomever they want. They just don't *care* 99.999999% of the time.


Story sucks w/o pix.
 
2013-02-19 08:59:52 PM  

TheKingHippo: I'm sorry, I lost interest in this story when I saw this headline link next to the article.

http://www.slate.com/articles/life/dear_prudence/2013/02/dear_pruden ce _my_wife_and_i_came_from_the_same_sperm_donor.html

/Wtf?


wtf indeed. I think that made my head hurt
 
2013-02-19 09:02:31 PM  
The ADSL equipment in many phone exchanges is now in a room that used to be called "the tape room" or "the recording room" depending on when the exchange was built if it was built during the cold war.  While I don't think it was ever done, they had enough room for tape recorders to record 10% of all active calls at any given time.
 
2013-02-19 09:40:12 PM  

nmemkha: I think I am just going to start dropping off a stool, urine samples and video of the previous night's masturbation sessions at my local FBI field office each morning.

/problem solved
//"Careful with that one. I had a few Loco Tacos last night after a night of cheap Mexican tequila drinking."


That's almost what this guy did.
http://www.ted.com/talks/hasan_elahi.html

Also, Your life can be made to be pretty miserable for quite a long time before warrants get thrown out or evidence is ruled inadmissible.
 
2013-02-19 11:04:41 PM  
I don't worry about it.

Had to get a top secret rating in the service.

They knew things about me that I was surprised to find out.
 
2013-02-19 11:41:44 PM  

Slam1263: I don't worry about it.

Had to get a top secret rating in the service.

They knew things about me that I was surprised to find out.


:"if" this is actually true, you should know that publicly demonstrating possession of a clearance of any level (esp. above Confidential or Secret) in any public forum is kinda highly frowned upon. You can directly submit a clearance level to a recruiter, but posting it to, say, Monster, ClearanceJobs, etc boards is frowned upon. Just a heads up.
 
2013-02-20 02:29:24 AM  

TinyFist: Slam1263: I don't worry about it.

Had to get a top secret rating in the service.

They knew things about me that I was surprised to find out.

:"if" this is actually true, you should know that publicly demonstrating possession of a clearance of any level (esp. above Confidential or Secret) in any public forum is kinda highly frowned upon. You can directly submit a clearance level to a recruiter, but posting it to, say, Monster, ClearanceJobs, etc boards is frowned upon. Just a heads up.


You shoulda been here in 2004-6. One of us, won't say who, actually posted his Intelink-S home page to Fark.

THAT was interesting. They found that sucker faster than you could have imagined.
 
2013-02-20 07:53:42 AM  

TinyFist: Slam1263: I don't worry about it.

Had to get a top secret rating in the service.

They knew things about me that I was surprised to find out.

:"if" this is actually true, you should know that publicly demonstrating possession of a clearance of any level (esp. above Confidential or Secret) in any public forum is kinda highly frowned upon. You can directly submit a clearance level to a recruiter, but posting it to, say, Monster, ClearanceJobs, etc boards is frowned upon. Just a heads up.


Honestly, you are expected to list your clearance on your resume now.  You won't get past the HR drones without it if the job description mentions it.  In DC there are career fairs where you can't even enter unless you have a TS, and since that's the first question out of any recruiter's mouth, it's honestly a waste of time if you don't.
 
2013-02-20 08:19:42 AM  

whidbey: Why does it seem that the worst haters of the US Government think the Obama administration is the same as what Bush was doing, or that it's comparable to the ultra-conservative warhawk regime of the late 1960s?


He is the same as Bush in matters of personal privacy. Obama's positions on that subject were originally laid out in his campaign platform when he was running against Hillary Clinton in the Democratic primaries back in 2008.

At the time, Obama supported many of the Bush administration's anti-privacy initiatives (like warrantless wiretapping) and stated he planned to continue them as President. So it's not like he didn't give us fair warning.

Power corrupts.
 
Displayed 110 of 110 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report