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(The Verge)   The new Galaxy S4 with 16 cores, yes 16 cores, comes out just shy of the Ides of March   (theverge.com) divider line 137
    More: Cool, Galaxy S, Galaxy Note, Samsung Electronics  
•       •       •

7103 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Feb 2013 at 11:22 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-19 05:10:43 PM  

RexTalionis: Klitch: So when does Samsung become the same as Apple for putting out new iterations of the same phone with small unnoticeable tweaks every year?

[cdn3.sbnation.com image 850x565]
Here's Samsung's curved-screen prototype. You can shut off the flat portion of the screen and only have a display on the curved "lip" so you can get text messages and alerts without turning on the entire screen and drawing power.


No slam here, but it's like having a pager again, at least one you could call back on. . It's almost we have gone full circle: have pager, complain that you can't do much with it : have cellphone, complain it takes up too much, just need to see one line notifications.

God, I thought I was a genius when I thought they should take a pager and put a phone on it back in 8th grade. Where's my Apple money?
 
2013-02-19 05:19:35 PM  

GavinTheAlmighty: kab: Using a phone to watch Netflix is pretty silly, I'll agree.

My data plan gives me unlimited data, so I watch Netflix when it's a cardio day at the gym.  It works out extremely well for me.  I have no other device that provides me with this opportunity.


I can circumvent a whole TV license by having Netflix on my phone. I never watch TV at home, but it's nice to have something to fall asleep to. TV license £130, Netflix £60. Per Annum. Ish.

I should say I have a TV license and don't have Netflix, but that seems to me to be a good reason to have it. I have watched stuff on my phone. It's fine. Yeah it's not a cinema, that's fine, so don't watch stuff on it you want the full experience from. If it's something to help you sleep it doens't matter what size the screen is.
 
2013-02-19 05:25:59 PM  

kab: kab: Earpj: I have a Nexus, Daughter has an S2, sons have iPhone 4s' (cause they were cheap). Know what? All of the phones work. We can all watch Netflix, text AND make phone calls.

/It's all silly to me.

Using a phone to watch Netflix is pretty silly, I'll agree.


You do realize some phones have an HDMI / MHL port so they can put said display onto a 60" home TV / stereo, right?  Most of these phones have CEC built in (called many things, like Samsung's AnyNet, Sony's Bravia Sync, etc), allowing you to use your existing TV's remote so you don't really have to learn anything else.

You have a portable media center in your pocket, why bother shelling out another $100 for a dedicated media box?
 
2013-02-19 05:46:26 PM  

Supes: rooftop235: Did anyone here read the part about how it will have an eye tracking feature? Why does me phone need to see where I am looking? Targeted advertising perhaps?

[991.com image 350x365]

Several people already noted, this is already in the current generation Galaxy, and primarily so the phone automatically shuts off when you're not looking at it.


Is that eye-tracking or facial recognition? And if it shuts off/goes to sleep when you're not looking at it, how does it detect when you are looking at it? Do motion-sensors wake it?

Honestly though, if Samsung chooses to pursue it, there's about a dozen additional and pretty cool ways that eye tracking can be utilized. Simple things like auto-scrolling/auto-page turning in books or websites, or for 3D video, would be easy to implement. It could also be used for games, augmented reality applications, a customized interface, etc... I don't know how high the quality of Samsung's eye-tracking is,  but expect to see it in more phones going forward and with lots of cool uses.

Not to mention Jakob Nielsen's next smartphone usability paper. ;-)
 
2013-02-19 06:11:35 PM  

SleepingEye: You do realize some phones have an HDMI / MHL port so they can put said display onto a 60" home TV / stereo, right?


The one time I tried to do that, it output the phone's resolution to the TV.  Needless to say, it wasn't pretty. Perhaps it's a setting I screwed up, but it was not palatable on a 42" TV.  Maybe I just had bad streaming quality that one time though.
 
2013-02-19 06:34:57 PM  

Mitch Taylor's Bro: Is that eye-tracking or facial recognition? And if it shuts off/goes to sleep when you're not looking at it, how does it detect when you are looking at it? Do motion-sensors wake it?


Samsung calls is eye-tracking. Whether that's technologically accurate phrasing, I have no idea.... while I don't have a SIII, I've played around with it. Based on my limited experience, it's more advanced than facial recognition (which has been in some Android phones for awhile now), but not quite actually eye-tracking yet (I think it recognizes "eyes," but not actually where you are looking, which pure eye tracking would do).

Honestly, I don't remember if there's a way to wake it up via the tracking feature... I just remember the phone has an eye icon that pops up periodically when you're reading something on it, to check that you're still looking. It worked perfectly if I closed my eyes, and I could fool it inconsistently by looking sideways.

Pretty cool stuff, though more ambitious practical applications are probably still an iteration or two away.
 
2013-02-19 06:39:33 PM  
Where is gingerjet claiming that the iphone 5 has the fastest processor in the market?

I am an tech manager at one of the largest carriers in the US.

My phone, an s2, never had a problem with it, and with juice defender, i get two days out of fairly heavy use.

But then again how many people leave gps and wifi on all the time?

Call me when apple lets you schedule every app on the phone, wait because you cannot.

My phone came out in 2011, I am running jellybean, 4g, nfc, and have a 64 gig chip in it.  Sorry, the iphone sucks, and I have only my most used apps on the home screen.

And I wanted to, I could buy a bigger battery...

We just did a study at work, and the largest part of our tech support dollars go to the iphone for either faulty hardware which apples says is our fault, or iphone users not understanding how to use their phone.
 
2013-02-19 06:40:39 PM  

Supes: Mitch Taylor's Bro: Is that eye-tracking or facial recognition? And if it shuts off/goes to sleep when you're not looking at it, how does it detect when you are looking at it? Do motion-sensors wake it?

Samsung calls is eye-tracking. Whether that's technologically accurate phrasing, I have no idea.... while I don't have a SIII, I've played around with it. Based on my limited experience, it's more advanced than facial recognition (which has been in some Android phones for awhile now), but not quite actually eye-tracking yet (I think it recognizes "eyes," but not actually where you are looking, which pure eye tracking would do).

Honestly, I don't remember if there's a way to wake it up via the tracking feature... I just remember the phone has an eye icon that pops up periodically when you're reading something on it, to check that you're still looking. It worked perfectly if I closed my eyes, and I could fool it inconsistently by looking sideways.

Pretty cool stuff, though more ambitious practical applications are probably still an iteration or two away.


I have it on my s2, it turns the front facing camera on and monitors the movements of your eyes, mainly blinking and it keeps the screen on.
 
2013-02-19 06:50:00 PM  

timujin: unlikely: And an extended battery life of 37 very long seconds will be one of the many reasons you love this device.

The "16 cores" in the headline were nowhere in the article.  That being said, my four-core Note II has great battery life, better than that of many of my friend's phones.


I love my Note II. The battery is indeed incredible. Unfortunately I dropped the goddamn thing 3 days after I got it and put a few cracks in the screen. Sprint can't fix it in store (They need something called a "clean room") even though I have a new screen and parts ordered and in my possession. I'm not ready to shell out $200 on the insurance deductible yet either so soon to the initial cost of the phone. It still works great though.
 
hej
2013-02-19 06:59:27 PM  

imgod2u: hej: hej: Slaxl: hej: I've heard this claim plenty of times, yet somehow the battery life still gets progressively worse as new models come out.  I suppose it's possible that it could be more to do with the unnecessarily high clock speed.

I thought battery life was improving. Of course we're still nowhere near the Nokia bricks of the early 00s, that lasted forever, but these are very different devices. They're more computer than phone. That they can last a day is amazing. It's going to be a long time before smartphones can last for a week. When they do something even better will come out with more power hungriness.

My Nexus 4 gets about half the battery life of my Galaxy S.  And that's despite it having a batter that's about 50% bigger, and having an LCD display instead of AMOLED.  And I thought that the newer versions of Android were supposed to be more efficient than the older ones...

And yes, I suppose this could be an apples & oranges comparison, since I'm comparing Samsung VS Qualcomm cpu's.

The US Galaxy S3 uses the same Qualcomm processor.


I had the original Galaxy S, which was a single core 1ghz Samsung.
 
2013-02-19 07:05:34 PM  

MagSeven: timujin: unlikely: And an extended battery life of 37 very long seconds will be one of the many reasons you love this device.

The "16 cores" in the headline were nowhere in the article.  That being said, my four-core Note II has great battery life, better than that of many of my friend's phones.

I love my Note II. The battery is indeed incredible. Unfortunately I dropped the goddamn thing 3 days after I got it and put a few cracks in the screen. Sprint can't fix it in store (They need something called a "clean room") even though I have a new screen and parts ordered and in my possession. I'm not ready to shell out $200 on the insurance deductible yet either so soon to the initial cost of the phone. It still works great though.


I'm quite clumsy and have found that the $6/month charge for up to three full replacements is well worth it.  I think I might have a $50 deductible, but I'm not certain there's even that.
 
2013-02-19 07:08:35 PM  

timujin: MagSeven: timujin: unlikely: And an extended battery life of 37 very long seconds will be one of the many reasons you love this device.

The "16 cores" in the headline were nowhere in the article.  That being said, my four-core Note II has great battery life, better than that of many of my friend's phones.

I love my Note II. The battery is indeed incredible. Unfortunately I dropped the goddamn thing 3 days after I got it and put a few cracks in the screen. Sprint can't fix it in store (They need something called a "clean room") even though I have a new screen and parts ordered and in my possession. I'm not ready to shell out $200 on the insurance deductible yet either so soon to the initial cost of the phone. It still works great though.

I'm quite clumsy and have found that the $6/month charge for up to three full replacements is well worth it.  I think I might have a $50 deductible, but I'm not certain there's even that.


Hmm. I'm not sure Sprint ever offered me that deal (or if they had it). Would have been nice!
 
2013-02-19 07:13:03 PM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Guess I'm old enough to remember not having a phone to take to the slopes, and still having a good time when we were idle.


I can have a good time with other people when I'm idle. I also sometimes like to check things on my phone. Or take pictures of the dumbass that's HOLD UP THE DAMN LIF.....

Anyway, gotta learn to adapt, man. Integrate change, don't resist it just because it's different.
 
2013-02-19 07:21:22 PM  

timujin: MagSeven: timujin: unlikely: And an extended battery life of 37 very long seconds will be one of the many reasons you love this device.

The "16 cores" in the headline were nowhere in the article.  That being said, my four-core Note II has great battery life, better than that of many of my friend's phones.

I love my Note II. The battery is indeed incredible. Unfortunately I dropped the goddamn thing 3 days after I got it and put a few cracks in the screen. Sprint can't fix it in store (They need something called a "clean room") even though I have a new screen and parts ordered and in my possession. I'm not ready to shell out $200 on the insurance deductible yet either so soon to the initial cost of the phone. It still works great though.

I'm quite clumsy and have found that the $6/month charge for up to three full replacements is well worth it.  I think I might have a $50 deductible, but I'm not certain there's even that.


In the us any cell phone carrier, like tmobile, sprimt, att, and verizon that uses assurion as their insurance provider have 199 deductibles for smart phones, and it is only twice a year.
 
2013-02-19 07:21:38 PM  

theflatline: Where is gingerjet claiming that the iphone 5 has the fastest processor in the market?

I am an tech manager at one of the largest carriers in the US.

My phone, an s2, never had a problem with it, and with juice defender, i get two days out of fairly heavy use.

But then again how many people leave gps and wifi on all the time?

Call me when apple lets you schedule every app on the phone, wait because you cannot.

My phone came out in 2011, I am running jellybean, 4g, nfc, and have a 64 gig chip in it.   Sorry, the iphone sucks, and I have only my most used apps on the home screen.

And I wanted to, I could buy a bigger battery...

We just did a study at work, and the largest part of our tech support dollars go to the iphone for either faulty hardware which apples says is our fault, or iphone users not understanding how to use their phone.


LOL, sorry you feel that way. I love mine.
 
2013-02-19 07:56:12 PM  

theflatline: timujin: MagSeven: timujin: unlikely: And an extended battery life of 37 very long seconds will be one of the many reasons you love this device.

The "16 cores" in the headline were nowhere in the article.  That being said, my four-core Note II has great battery life, better than that of many of my friend's phones.

I love my Note II. The battery is indeed incredible. Unfortunately I dropped the goddamn thing 3 days after I got it and put a few cracks in the screen. Sprint can't fix it in store (They need something called a "clean room") even though I have a new screen and parts ordered and in my possession. I'm not ready to shell out $200 on the insurance deductible yet either so soon to the initial cost of the phone. It still works great though.

I'm quite clumsy and have found that the $6/month charge for up to three full replacements is well worth it.  I think I might have a $50 deductible, but I'm not certain there's even that.

In the us any cell phone carrier, like tmobile, sprimt, att, and verizon that uses assurion as their insurance provider have 199 deductibles for smart phones, and it is only twice a year.


I lost/destroyed my previous phone three times, that was the end of my coverage.  Each time the deductible was $50.  This time I got the next step up in insurance, though I don't remember offhand what the terms were and I'm much too lazy to bother looking them up right now.
 
2013-02-19 09:51:02 PM  

theflatline: Where is gingerjet claiming that the iphone 5 has the fastest processor in the market?

I am an tech manager at one of the largest carriers in the US.

My phone, an s2, never had a problem with it, and with juice defender, i get two days out of fairly heavy use.

But then again how many people leave gps and wifi on all the time?

Call me when apple lets you schedule every app on the phone, wait because you cannot.

My phone came out in 2011, I am running jellybean, 4g, nfc, and have a 64 gig chip in it.  Sorry, the iphone sucks, and I have only my most used apps on the home screen.

And I wanted to, I could buy a bigger battery...

We just did a study at work, and the largest part of our tech support dollars go to the iphone for either faulty hardware which apples says is our fault, or iphone users not understanding how to use their phone.


Geez, what a fanboi.
 
2013-02-19 09:51:07 PM  
I want to point out that you can buy an original Samsung Galaxy S in good condition for 85$ on Ebay. It is very easy to stably overclock it to 1.3ghz and run Jellybean on it. The roms are VERY MATURE, running better than anything you've seen from the factory.

I've set four of these up for relatives and they are pleased. How often can you use a 2 year old phone and still run your crap at full speed? Thats how good the real Galaxy S models are.
 
2013-02-19 10:37:46 PM  

Arkanaut: I come to bury the iPhone, not to praise it.


While Apple have been busy suing their competitors, said competitors have been innovating. Apple is stupid.
 
2013-02-20 12:40:25 AM  

MagSeven: timujin: unlikely: And an extended battery life of 37 very long seconds will be one of the many reasons you love this device.

The "16 cores" in the headline were nowhere in the article.  That being said, my four-core Note II has great battery life, better than that of many of my friend's phones.

I love my Note II. The battery is indeed incredible. Unfortunately I dropped the goddamn thing 3 days after I got it and put a few cracks in the screen. Sprint can't fix it in store (They need something called a "clean room") even though I have a new screen and parts ordered and in my possession. I'm not ready to shell out $200 on the insurance deductible yet either so soon to the initial cost of the phone. It still works great though.



A clean room is a room built with filtration to be dust free, as whenever you work on an unprotected screen the slightest dust spec can pretty much ruin the job and annoy you every time you look at the screen. Years ago when I added the Afterburner kit to my old Game Boy Advanced that was a concern. The way you got around it was to run a hot shower for a while so the bathroom gets all steamy, and the steam will keep the air more dust free than usual. So you do whatever part of the assembly that the screen is exposed during in the bathroom while the shower is going (not actually IN the shower, of course).
 
2013-02-20 01:25:23 AM  
Huh. It takes a lot of fancy gizmos to ring someone these days. I'm sure glad I kept my old Nokia, it doesn't need half this fancy stuff and it still takes calls!
 
2013-02-20 02:21:45 AM  

hej: imgod2u: hej: hej: Slaxl: hej: I've heard this claim plenty of times, yet somehow the battery life still gets progressively worse as new models come out.  I suppose it's possible that it could be more to do with the unnecessarily high clock speed.

I thought battery life was improving. Of course we're still nowhere near the Nokia bricks of the early 00s, that lasted forever, but these are very different devices. They're more computer than phone. That they can last a day is amazing. It's going to be a long time before smartphones can last for a week. When they do something even better will come out with more power hungriness.

My Nexus 4 gets about half the battery life of my Galaxy S.  And that's despite it having a batter that's about 50% bigger, and having an LCD display instead of AMOLED.  And I thought that the newer versions of Android were supposed to be more efficient than the older ones...

And yes, I suppose this could be an apples & oranges comparison, since I'm comparing Samsung VS Qualcomm cpu's.

The US Galaxy S3 uses the same Qualcomm processor.

I had the original Galaxy S, which was a single core 1ghz Samsung.


I'm *still* using an original Galaxy S, because my OMGWORSTPOSPHONEEVER LG Nitro finally bricked itself one too many times, and I was tired of popping out the battery every time I made or received a call, so I went back to my old one.

/Will be getting the S4 when I am eligible for an upgrade in June.
 
2013-02-20 02:23:49 AM  

Ciper: I want to point out that you can buy an original Samsung Galaxy S in good condition for 85$ on Ebay. It is very easy to stably overclock it to 1.3ghz and run Jellybean on it. The roms are VERY MATURE, running better than anything you've seen from the factory.

I've set four of these up for relatives and they are pleased. How often can you use a 2 year old phone and still run your crap at full speed? Thats how good the real Galaxy S models are.


Yeah, but it still has no flash and a terrible transceiver on it. I get no signal at all in my house with the S, but I had 3 bars here with my Nitro, and the roommates S2 has no issues either.
 
2013-02-20 02:27:36 AM  

Ciper: I want to point out that you can buy an original Samsung Galaxy S in good condition for 85$ on Ebay. It is very easy to stably overclock it to 1.3ghz and run Jellybean on it. The roms are VERY MATURE, running better than anything you've seen from the factory.

I've set four of these up for relatives and they are pleased. How often can you use a 2 year old phone and still run your crap at full speed? Thats how good the real Galaxy S models are.


Actually, ok.. I'll bite. I have a backup if this goes tits up. You have a stepped out instruction set up, or just "doing it for them?"

I spent all last weekend trying to get my Nitro stable, and I think I am kinda done with "lets see what works" modding for awhile, but if you have a step by step, I'd shoot for it.

JB? Really? I would be happy with ICS. I'm running GB on it. Saw someone running KL last weekend though. That was awesome.
 
2013-02-20 03:27:11 AM  

timujin: theflatline: timujin: MagSeven: timujin: unlikely: And an extended battery life of 37 very long seconds will be one of the many reasons you love this device.

The "16 cores" in the headline were nowhere in the article.  That being said, my four-core Note II has great battery life, better than that of many of my friend's phones.

I love my Note II. The battery is indeed incredible. Unfortunately I dropped the goddamn thing 3 days after I got it and put a few cracks in the screen. Sprint can't fix it in store (They need something called a "clean room") even though I have a new screen and parts ordered and in my possession. I'm not ready to shell out $200 on the insurance deductible yet either so soon to the initial cost of the phone. It still works great though.

I'm quite clumsy and have found that the $6/month charge for up to three full replacements is well worth it.  I think I might have a $50 deductible, but I'm not certain there's even that.

In the us any cell phone carrier, like tmobile, sprimt, att, and verizon that uses assurion as their insurance provider have 199 deductibles for smart phones, and it is only twice a year.

I lost/destroyed my previous phone three times, that was the end of my coverage.  Each time the deductible was $50.  This time I got the next step up in insurance, though I don't remember offhand what the terms were and I'm much too lazy to bother looking them up right now.


The deductible on the Note 2 is 150. Great phone, though. I have one myself. Phenomenal device.

gingerjet:
/always amused when the first thing any of my friends do when they come over is plug in their Samsung phones into an outlet

Do you have a humiliation and degredation fetish or something, because advertising either your incredible ignorance or your incredible trollishness so early in a thread pretty much invalidates any attempt by anybody else to take you seriously in any way.
 
2013-02-20 03:31:23 AM  
gingerjet:
/always amused when the first thing any of my friends do when they come over is plug in their Samsung phones into an outlet

You have friends when you're that much of a blithering idiot or that much of a jackass? I'm surprised.
 
2013-02-20 03:32:06 AM  
Woops. Doubleposted my shock at the troll. Apologies.
 
2013-02-20 04:01:51 AM  

Slaxl: hej: I've heard this claim plenty of times, yet somehow the battery life still gets progressively worse as new models come out.  I suppose it's possible that it could be more to do with the unnecessarily high clock speed.

I thought battery life was improving. Of course we're still nowhere near the Nokia bricks of the early 00s, that lasted forever, but these are very different devices. They're more computer than phone. That they can last a day is amazing. It's going to be a long time before smartphones can last for a week. When they do something even better will come out with more power hungriness.


Depends on what you mean by "improving".  My Nokia "brick" from 2000 could use interchangeable batteries ranging from less than a quarter inch (quite thin at the time) to actual brick size.  The little battery gave me a couple days of use, the brick gave me a couple weeks.  That two week brick is no longer an option and I don't consider that an improvement.  I can't even go for a weekend in Vegas without packing my charger and cable.  My very first cell phone was a Sony Z100.  Came with a lithium battery that gave me a full 24 hours.  Even at 2 years old, it was giving me around 18 hours.  About the same as my Galaxy Nexus gets today.  So, 15 or 16 years down the road, I'm not seeing a big boost in Away From Charger time.   My current phone's been off the charger for about 10 hours and it's at 40% with very light use.

Sure my current phone does a lot more but all of the advances in energy storage have been immediately absorbed by increased power requirements.
 
2013-02-20 05:17:39 AM  

mongbiohazard: MagSeven: timujin: unlikely: And an extended battery life of 37 very long seconds will be one of the many reasons you love this device.

The "16 cores" in the headline were nowhere in the article.  That being said, my four-core Note II has great battery life, better than that of many of my friend's phones.

I love my Note II. The battery is indeed incredible. Unfortunately I dropped the goddamn thing 3 days after I got it and put a few cracks in the screen. Sprint can't fix it in store (They need something called a "clean room") even though I have a new screen and parts ordered and in my possession. I'm not ready to shell out $200 on the insurance deductible yet either so soon to the initial cost of the phone. It still works great though.


A clean room is a room built with filtration to be dust free, as whenever you work on an unprotected screen the slightest dust spec can pretty much ruin the job and annoy you every time you look at the screen. Years ago when I added the Afterburner kit to my old Game Boy Advanced that was a concern. The way you got around it was to run a hot shower for a while so the bathroom gets all steamy, and the steam will keep the air more dust free than usual. So you do whatever part of the assembly that the screen is exposed during in the bathroom while the shower is going (not actually IN the shower, of course).


Cool. That makes sense. The guy was trying to explain it to me and he made it sound like he needed sterile clothes and a "boy in the plastic bubble" sort of area. I think I'm just gonna throw an extra 25 into checking every week and pay the deductible in a month or so. Maybe sell the screen and adhesive housing I already bought on Ebay. I just hate to pay $200 on top of what I paid for the phone so soon. There is one last cell repair store I haven't looked into. Keeping my fingers crossed....
 
2013-02-20 05:19:42 AM  

Shadow Blasko: hej: imgod2u: hej: hej: Slaxl: hej: I've heard this claim plenty of times, yet somehow the battery life still gets progressively worse as new models come out.  I suppose it's possible that it could be more to do with the unnecessarily high clock speed.

I thought battery life was improving. Of course we're still nowhere near the Nokia bricks of the early 00s, that lasted forever, but these are very different devices. They're more computer than phone. That they can last a day is amazing. It's going to be a long time before smartphones can last for a week. When they do something even better will come out with more power hungriness.

My Nexus 4 gets about half the battery life of my Galaxy S.  And that's despite it having a batter that's about 50% bigger, and having an LCD display instead of AMOLED.  And I thought that the newer versions of Android were supposed to be more efficient than the older ones...

And yes, I suppose this could be an apples & oranges comparison, since I'm comparing Samsung VS Qualcomm cpu's.

The US Galaxy S3 uses the same Qualcomm processor.

I had the original Galaxy S, which was a single core 1ghz Samsung.

I'm *still* using an original Galaxy S, because my OMGWORSTPOSPHONEEVER LG Nitro finally bricked itself one too many times, and I was tired of popping out the battery every time I made or received a call, so I went back to my old one.

/Will be getting the S4 when I am eligible for an upgrade in June.


I had an LG Rumor that I used to have to keep in the freezer for an hour in order to see the screen display for three hours. Once I figured out the system, It worked!
 
2013-02-20 08:02:44 AM  
The design is a tightly guarded secret?

Spoiler Alert!

Its a rectangle with rounded edges.
 
2013-02-20 12:39:33 PM  

Omis: The design is a tightly guarded secret?

Spoiler Alert!

Its a rectangle with rounded edges.


Sorry, Apple has that patented.
 
2013-02-20 12:56:27 PM  
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9ZNgL15Q2IQ&feature=youtube_gdata_play er

Formula match ftw
 
2013-02-20 01:37:48 PM  

starsrift: Huh. It takes a lot of fancy gizmos to ring someone these days. I'm sure glad I kept my old Nokia, it doesn't need half this fancy stuff and it still takes calls!


No, these "fancy gizmos" aren't needed to "ring someone" and that's hardly the point any more.  The device I carry in my pocket is a portal into the entire history of mankind, a near sum of all of our knowledge available at my fingertips whenever I need it.  I also happens to make phone calls.

/also, the "hyuk, hyuk" yokel routine is going from stale to sad.  You don't have to want this capability, but acting as though that is somehow a more pure choice is stupid.  You sound like someone ten years ago saying they can make calls just fine, <yokel voice> all they need to do is go into their living room where their perfectly good phone is wired into the wall, they don't need to carry one o' them fancy portable phones around just to talk to folks.</yokel voice>
 
2013-02-20 03:26:59 PM  
I have the Galaxy SII and its battery life blows. I take it off the charger around 9am and by 5pm it's beeping "low battery".  This is not good enough.  I used to have a blackberry curve for work.  That bastard would laste four days on a single charge.  Last week they replaced it with the Sony "James Bond" phone.  I'm not sure I'm happy with this "upgrade", especially since the only requirements for my work phone are SMS and phone calls.  I don't need fancy Android features.

I won't get new phone that won't last a single day on a charge.   I've learned my lesson.
 
2013-02-20 09:42:42 PM  

timujin: starsrift: Huh. It takes a lot of fancy gizmos to ring someone these days. I'm sure glad I kept my old Nokia, it doesn't need half this fancy stuff and it still takes calls!

No, these "fancy gizmos" aren't needed to "ring someone" and that's hardly the point any more.  The device I carry in my pocket is a portal into the entire history of mankind, a near sum of all of our knowledge available at my fingertips whenever I need it.  I also happens to make phone calls.

/also, the "hyuk, hyuk" yokel routine is going from stale to sad.  You don't have to want this capability, but acting as though that is somehow a more pure choice is stupid.  You sound like someone ten years ago saying they can make calls just fine, <yokel voice> all they need to do is go into their living room where their perfectly good phone is wired into the wall, they don't need to carry one o' them fancy portable phones around just to talk to folks.</yokel voice>


The word you've lost with your portal into the entire history of mankind is luddite.
You missed the point. You're trapped into a cycle of hardware and software upgrades, just to make phone calls. Meanwhile, the other things you do with your phone there is a time and place for, which is also when you can access non-mobile devices. While you're out eating dinner, attending a meeting, or a billion other tasks of life, is not really the time to be pulling out your portal to the entire history of mankind. The world's going on around you, but you're focused into a little 5 inch screen while it passes you by. When is a time for these things? Well, when you're sitting down to work, or relax. Your office, most like. Or your couch at home.
 
2013-02-20 10:49:02 PM  

starsrift: timujin: starsrift: Huh. It takes a lot of fancy gizmos to ring someone these days. I'm sure glad I kept my old Nokia, it doesn't need half this fancy stuff and it still takes calls!

No, these "fancy gizmos" aren't needed to "ring someone" and that's hardly the point any more.  The device I carry in my pocket is a portal into the entire history of mankind, a near sum of all of our knowledge available at my fingertips whenever I need it.  I also happens to make phone calls.

/also, the "hyuk, hyuk" yokel routine is going from stale to sad.  You don't have to want this capability, but acting as though that is somehow a more pure choice is stupid.  You sound like someone ten years ago saying they can make calls just fine, <yokel voice> all they need to do is go into their living room where their perfectly good phone is wired into the wall, they don't need to carry one o' them fancy portable phones around just to talk to folks.</yokel voice>

The word you've lost with your portal into the entire history of mankind is luddite.
You missed the point. You're trapped into a cycle of hardware and software upgrades, just to make phone calls. Meanwhile, the other things you do with your phone there is a time and place for, which is also when you can access non-mobile devices. While you're out eating dinner, attending a meeting, or a billion other tasks of life, is not really the time to be pulling out your portal to the entire history of mankind. The world's going on around you, but you're focused into a little 5 inch screen while it passes you by. When is a time for these things? Well, when you're sitting down to work, or relax. Your office, most like. Or your couch at home.


I don't find that the descriptor applies, you're still using a phone, you're not sending your messages via semaphore or smoke signal.  And, no, I'm not "trapped" in anything, I upgraded my phone recently after having my previous Droid for three years.  I had the Q before that for just as long.  But it's still not "just to make phone calls", that's the exact point I was making, the device is for all of the other things I can do.  The fact that it also has the capability to make phone calls is nice.  It's also nice that my computer has a calculator app, but it's not the primary purpose for having one anymore.

As for the "time and place" argument, it is you who are missing the point.  You are again echoing those who a decade before would have said that the time and place for talking on the phone is when you're at home on the couch.  You don't, I hope, talk on your cellphone while eating dinner, attending a meeting or dealing with those "billion other tasks".  Nor am I "focused on a little 5 inch screen" during those times.

But purchasing a new CD by a band I just heard over a store speaker, finding out what the best Thai restaurant is in a five block radius of some random street corner I've never been to and will likely never be at again, taking a pic of something randomly beautiful or simply answering a question that has come up in conversation, all of those are things that this device allows me to do "in the moment" and that would be lost by the time I got to my home computer.

And since I can take all of that with me, since I can take care of those things as they come, I find I'm much more rarely on my couch.

Again, you don't have to want that capability, there's nothing wrong with not having it.  But to pretend that abstaining from it grants you some sort of purity of purpose makes you seem desperate for a sense of superiority.
 
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