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(Yahoo)   A horse is a horse, of course, of course. Unless, of course, that horse, of course, is pasta with beef   (news.yahoo.com) divider line 4
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4297 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Feb 2013 at 10:00 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-19 10:16:01 AM
2 votes:

CipollinaFan: Still don't really understand this story. Horses are not bread for their meat like cattle are. Horses have less meat on them then cows. Raising or buying a horse seems like it would cost around the same in not more than a cow. Substituting horse meat sounds like it would cost the exact same if not more then it would to just have pure cow meat.


In countries that slaughter horses, you can sell your old/extras to an abattoir.   My guess is that someone is using unsold horsemeat as filler for their 'beef'.

When demand for horsemeat is low, there is perhaps economic incentive to make use of it.  Complicating matters though is that these foodmakers and/or their suppliers mix together meat that can come from many different origins.  For some reason, there seems to be little oversight to discourage the practice.
2013-02-19 10:09:32 AM
2 votes:
Still don't really understand this story. Horses are not bread for their meat like cattle are. Horses have less meat on them then cows. Raising or buying a horse seems like it would cost around the same in not more than a cow. Substituting horse meat sounds like it would cost the exact same if not more then it would to just have pure cow meat.
2013-02-19 11:09:13 AM
1 votes:
A horse is a course. Period.

The scale of this operation suggests mafia involvement. An earlier article attributed the ample supply of unwanted horses to the banning of horses and horse carts on roads in Romania. There's probably plenty of shady dealers in Romania, but an estimated one tenth of EU subsidies for agriculture go to the Italian mafia and they have invested heavily in windmills because of the profitability after subsidies. This is an EU-wide operation and I'm not going to be surprised when I learn that some horse meat has trickled into the beef supply of North America or elsewhere. Money is money no matter where made.

I expect the British food safety authorities are as elaborate and efficient as the FDA or better. Most countries have better regulation and inspection that the US, which is owned by the big corporations. Imagine what shenanigans  our processed meat industry gets up to.

Just remember when you bad mouth the FDA, you are badmouthing the agency that made American food safer than China's food supply. Children were dying from drinking fake milk (chalk water) in the US until the FDA was founded, just as they still do in China. You think the lead in Latin American or Chinese candy is bad--American food fraudsters were adulterating food with prussian blue, and other known toxins. There was a roaring trade in wooden nutmegs in New England, and horses are fine Kobe beef compared to the road kill that goes into rendered fat and sub-human grade meat such as dog and cat food. Without the FDA you'd be eating a heck of a lot more fake milk, meat, etc., as well as toxic additives.

Even with the FDA, manufacturers are allowed to carry on old frauds such as soaking meat in brine to increase its weight at low cost. Ham, chicken and other meat is half farking salt water. You can find "premium" chicken in the stores with labels which boast that this is not done. Top brand chicken. Hey! We haven't adulterated this chicken. Pay us more!

Food safety is too important to leave to mafiosi, er, corporations. Because the profit motive is a criminal motive about half the time. Sure, there are honest businessmen. There may be executives who eat their own product. There may be. Don't count on it if what you are eating is more than 50% white flour, salt, sugar, fat, oil, soya byproduct, or filler.

You don't get what you pay for. This is business. What you pay for is easily and quickly redefined as profit if not "economic rent".

Even buying "whole" foods isn't a guarantee of quality. A lot of beef is bits from the abattoir floor glued together with an "edible" glue to look like a nice cut of meat. It's not a cut of meat--it is trimmings and glue.

Also, things like fruit and vegetables are forced with so much water and artificial ripening, that they bear little or no resemblance to real food. Oranges, for example, have one eighth as much vitamin C as they did in the 1950s. Natural oranges are seldom uniformly colored and they tend to be a much paler orange than the dayglo stuff you find supermarkets today.

Milo Mindbender, in the novel Catch-22, buys a lot of Egyptian cotton and then finds there is no market for it. So he tries feeding it to the troops. He was a man ahead of his time, Milo Mindbender. A man devious enough to hire out a USA airforce squadron to the Nazis to bomb his fellow American troops (at the same base as he was stationed, IIRC) would go far on Madison Avenue, or anywhere in the industrial-military-media-congressional complex today.

There's no such thing as a crime-free lunch. And if there is, it's only because the crime was made legal by Congress or some other legislative or regulatory body in the employ of the upper criminal classes.
2013-02-19 10:11:58 AM
1 votes:

CipollinaFan: Still don't really understand this story. Horses are not bread for their meat like cattle are. Horses have less meat on them then cows. Raising or buying a horse seems like it would cost around the same in not more than a cow. Substituting horse meat sounds like it would cost the exact same if not more then it would to just have pure cow meat.


That said, I don't have any particular problem eating a horse. Hard for me to consider horse meat scandalous outside of false advertising and deceptive business practices.
 
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