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(Mother Nature Network)   "Do you want to take a ride in my new car," "Do I have to be at work every day," "Could I get a pay advance," and other questions you should never ask during a job interview   (mnn.com) divider line 57
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9744 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Feb 2013 at 9:46 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2013-02-19 12:45:09 PM
4 votes:

cefm: How about "don't attempt to negotiate a salary that is CLEARLY outside of the range listed in the written job posting".

It makes me think you didn't read the job description, or you're an idiot, or you're a schemer.  All of these are bad.


You mean, "don't attempt to negotiate a salary that we CLEARLY stated as  competitive".  I rarely see the actual salary range stated in the job posting.
2013-02-19 10:28:28 AM
4 votes:

seadoo2006: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

So, I'll see you on Saturday and Sunday, right?  Asking what days you're working and what hours you're expected to work are not bad questions ... how else are you going to know when to come in the first day?


Yep, saying "Can I set my own hours?", or "Do I have to come in everyday?", aren't the proper way to word the question. You should ask, "What is the typical schedule I will be working?", "Will I always be working from this location?"

That would casually lead the manager to tell you about any flex schedule or working at home possibilities.
2013-02-19 10:21:58 AM
4 votes:

cfreak: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

As an IT worker it amazes me that there are still businesses who think my job is 9 - 5 and then turns around wanting late meetings, weekend work, etc.


This to the n'th degree.

I work a job now where they will dock pay and bonuses if I'm late or leave early.

They wanted me to come in on Saturday and rebuild someone's email.  I told them they would need to schedule their tragedies during business hours otherwise they would need to review their policy regarding my attendance.

If they fire me then so be it.  It's better to get it over now than dance around it and be stressed about it for years before it happens anyway.
2013-02-19 09:51:39 AM
4 votes:
I'm starting to understand why "millennials" are having such a tough time finding jobs...
2013-02-19 11:12:04 AM
3 votes:

xalres: I've sworn off dealing with recruiters with a face to face requirement because more often than not it's a massive waste of time. You waste the time and gas to get to their offices, waste $8 - $15 to park in the parking structure because they don't validate, only to have a 5 minute conversation with the head recruiter about your career goals before they sit you in a room and have different guys come in and pitch jobs at you that either don't meet your requirements (salary, location, contract instead of full-perm) or you're unqualified for (I'm looking for a .NET position, what makes you think I can also program in Java? Is it in my resume?).


You forgot the part where you have to sit in the lobby transcribing information off your resume onto a poorly designed paper form for a half hour before the receptionist will even tell the recruiter that you're there.

Never again.
2013-02-19 10:19:57 AM
3 votes:

Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.


Not a millennial here but I'm not going to work at a company that doesn't give me flexible hours. Not spending an extra hour a day in my car so I can be at work at a certain time. I'm either in early and out early or in late and out late. I have better things to do. Sometimes that includes learning things for my profession in my free time. I also know there's always someone else who will be flexible for me.

/jobs that have been flexible with my time, I've been flexible with their time.
2013-02-19 10:18:54 AM
3 votes:
I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.
2013-02-19 10:06:05 AM
3 votes:

Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.


As an IT worker it amazes me that there are still businesses who think my job is 9 - 5 and then turns around wanting late meetings, weekend work, etc.
2013-02-19 06:27:18 PM
2 votes:

durbnpoisn: You go in their database and never leave. I still get calls from Mr. Santa Monica Office, or, as I have him marked in my phone "DO NOT ANSWER! DICKHOLE ALERT!", despite my repeated refusals to work with his company. The "job application" you fill out is most likely so the data entry monkeys who put it into the system only have to work with one format for every applicant.

I've gotten so annoyed by that sort of thing that I write back to the recruiter saying, "Where on my resume does it say I'm anywhere near San Diego, or North Carolina?!"
It's even more amusing when they are offering a 6 month contract. Right... I will relocate my family for a 6 month contract.


I love the guys who email my college address and are like "I found your resume in our database and think you'd be a great fit for this entry level job for $35k/year"  Jesus guys, if you think the resume you got from me in 2004 is indicative of my current skill level, how can I be a "great fit" for any job?
Or: Why would I want to work for the software company that's not smart enough to sort search results by timestamp and/or discard expired documents?
2013-02-19 12:14:27 PM
2 votes:

durbnpoisn: After having done a gazillion or so interviews over the past few years, I deffinitely can say what is wrong with the interview process and hiring proctices today...


1.  Too many people lie or exagerate on their resume.  This is a REAL problem.  Because it has gotten companies so untrusting that they will grill you uneccessarily hard to make sure you're not one of those liars.  I've actually had to sit there and write JavaScipt on a pad and paper, or PHP on a white board, and explain how the code works. (Seriously?!)

2.  Many companies don't want to interview someone unless they are reasonably sure there is a point to it.  It's a waste of their time to try to screen all these people... So they let recruiters take care of the initial screening.  In many cases, the recruiter doesn't know anything about the position other than the buzz words they were told to ask about.  It also happens where a recruiter will set you up for an interview, and can tell you nothing about what the job entails.  Something like, "you know, typical JavaScript, CSS..."

3.  Companies don't know what they are really looking for.  Here is a scenerio:  I got hired to take on small projects, where using the full .NET with MVC3 was just entirely too bloated for the simplicity of the web pages (simple forms and stuff).  They brought me on to work in old school PHP.  Once I get in the door, I come to find that they have no means of executing PHP code.  So, I had to get that all set up for them on their IIS server.  They had no testing environment.  Had to set that up too.  Then I find out that the technology director doesn't agree with the guy who hired me about how my code should be written.  He wants to use the Zend MVC framework for PHP.  Which, for the record, is even more bloated than .Net.  Then they abruptly lost the client for whom I was supposed to be making these pages in the first place, and let me go.

4.  Many companies are not really thrilled about hiring people full time.  It's all a ...


The way to fix number 1 is for companies to quit lying about job expectations and requirements.  When they require 5 years experience to qualify for an entry level position, people are going to lie.   Companies have gotten lazy when it comes to their responsibility to the employees, you can't blame applicants for trying to bypass the bullshiat requirements when they know they're bullshiat.
2013-02-19 11:20:42 AM
2 votes:

GalFriday: WhippingBoy: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

Sounds like the poor girl had a debilitating mental illness and was trying her best.
At least you get to feel superior to her, and show the internet how cool you are.

Bring it on ITG!

What I had was a highly educated and well-trained serologist in front of me.  There was nothing mentally wrong with her other than her crippling immaturity.


A scientist lacking people skills?  UNPOSSIBLE!

Chances are, you either gave up an incredible asset to your team, or dodged a massive bullet.  I doubt there's much middle ground there.
Ant
2013-02-19 10:57:00 AM
2 votes:

DarkSoulNoHope: "Are you a company that tells me I work weekdays only, but will you still ask me to come in for Saturday and Sunday work and late night meetings, even when you know I will have other plans?"


I don't see a problem with this. Work is not life. A person should be able to plan stuff after work and on weekends without that person's employer feeling that they own all of their employees' time.
2013-02-19 10:30:09 AM
2 votes:

texdent: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

That's a new level of crazy.


The term now is "velcro parent"; "helicopter parent" involves more hovering protectively at a slight disance
2013-02-19 10:12:24 AM
2 votes:

Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.


So, I'll see you on Saturday and Sunday, right?  Asking what days you're working and what hours you're expected to work are not bad questions ... how else are you going to know when to come in the first day?
2013-02-19 10:07:06 AM
2 votes:

Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.


I negotiated a 30 hour work week last time I interviewed. And working from home a couple of days a week. A couple of the other guys negotiated relocation packages, which is like an advance you don't have to pay back.

I guess if you are applying to be an anonymous cog in a corporate machine maybe the idea of the interview is to prove you will be able to fit in that regime and these sorts of recommendations might be useful.
2013-02-19 10:01:34 AM
2 votes:
Seems like the author has been out of the workforce for a while. Flexible work arrangement are fairly common for white-collar jobs these days, particularly at larger companies.
2013-02-19 09:58:49 AM
2 votes:
People still get job interviews?
That's a bizarre idea.
I thought there was a massive shortage of skilled, qualified workers in the US and A.
2013-02-19 09:51:09 AM
2 votes:
Eh, some of those are really off-base.  Like the ones about hours and being in the office every day.  You might have a schedule that requires you to work wonky hours and/or WFH.  If that's going to be a problem, I'd rather have it put out there early than waste everybody's time interviewing you.

Same with the "job for my partner" bit.  If you're looking at a job that would require you to move, you need to let them know what factors would affect your move.  I wouldn't stop an interview over that, but it gives the employer a heads up as to what kind of time frame they'll be looking at if they want to hire you.  (I would maybe advise caution about using the word "partner" though.  If it's your spouse, you're pretty safe to bet that won't affect your interview.  But if it's an unmarried or--ghasp--homosexual partner, you might inadvertently push an asshat interviewer against you).

I've learned to hate the "how do you think I did" thing, and I'm pretty sure our recruiter advises all the candidates to ask that one.  I used to get upset when companies would turn me down without feedback, but being on the other side of the fence, I'm starting to see how awkward it is when some moron asks that and you don't feel comfortable saying "you're a moron and you clearly bombed the interview.  Why are you even asking?" to their face.
2013-02-19 07:33:36 PM
1 votes:

serial_crusher: I love the guys who email my college address and are like "I found your resume in our database and think you'd be a great fit for this entry level job for $35k/year"  Jesus guys, if you think the resume you got from me in 2004 is indicative of my current skill level, how can I be a "great fit" for any job?
Or: Why would I want to work for the software company that's not smart enough to sort search results by timestamp and/or discard expired documents?


Just cause they found your resume doesn't mean they read your resume.
2013-02-19 06:33:36 PM
1 votes:

serial_crusher: WordyGrrl: abigsmurf:  Something far worse: sent off loads of applications, got a call asking for me to come in to talk about a job. Got all nervous, prepared for the interview, suit dry cleaned etc.

Did a quick check of the business before I left so I knew what they did... It was an agency. They'd acted like it was an actual job interview just so they could get my name on their books. I was mildly vexed to say the least.

I had the same thing happen, though I didn't find out it was a headhunter agency until I took the day off (without pay) from my temp job for the "interview." After about 30 minutes of "interview chit chat," the gal finally revealed that they were a headhunter agency and wanted to charge me $4,000 for them to find me a job. "Most young people just put it on their credit card," she said.

Why are you people not checking into the company in advance?  Even if not to weed out scammers, managers like it when you know something about the company when you show up.  You should be researching them as part of your normal interview preparation.


My headhunter encounter happened in the mid-90s, and the company didn't have any sort of internet presence yet. At the time, most of my resumes went out by snail mail to damn near any company advertising in the want ads. But to this day, I refuse to apply to any company with "agency" in the title.
2013-02-19 03:22:45 PM
1 votes:
THIS topic makes me grumble, grumble, grumble.

1)  HR people are overpaid word finders.  They don't know shiat about the jobs they post, and if you don't know shiat about it, you shouldn't be in charge of finding someone for it.
     a)  They wanted someone to teach classes to government employees, classes I'm very well accustomed to as I worked for the gov.  They wanted someone with a degree in Education, Psych., or English.
          I have a Master's in Linguistics and used to teach English at a community college and university.  I did not get considered for the job because I did not have the degrees they were looking for.
2)  Apparently, the corporate world finds my previous work as a teacher and manager of a division for a large city inefficient for their "very different work environment."  That's what the lady at the temp
     agency told me.  So, here I am farking around on Fark at my corporate temp job that is so ridiculously easy, I have time to fark around on Fark.  And here is the big difference between the government
     job and the corporation: Money.  The corporation has more money.
2013-02-19 02:54:02 PM
1 votes:

durbnpoisn: 1.  Too many people lie or exagerate on their resume.


I have the exact opposite problem. I tend to under-estimate my abilities. I'm not too good in interviews (nerves, social anxiety even) and am desperately afraid of being caught out if I pad my resume. But, I'm a quick learner and can figure things out on my own.

Example- I worked a few days for a video transfer place- they digitized VCR tapes onto DVDs. They used a script in Photoshop to import frames of the videos to make chapter listings for the DVD. On one of their 4 machines the script didn't work. I had never used Photoshop, per se, before, much less scripts for it, but I took a look, and found the problem- the paths it was using were wrong. Corrected it and increased their production by 33%!

I like to fool around with automating tasks. One job I had (retail helpdesk), we had to run various SQL commands during yearly inventory to clear the inventory tables and such. I poked around and found 'isql', the command line version. A few batch files and a little Qbasic later, and I had a handy program that could do in seconds what the other techs took a half hour to do.

I'm good with computer hardware too. Built several computers, even a TVPC (it's a 'Home Theater PC', but I don't really have a "home theater", just the TV, so...). A job doing computer repair and custom builds would be great... but I don't deal well with customers directly. (Like many nerds/geeks, I'm socially... awkward. I prefer computers to people.)

Also, I don't have any real 'formal' training. Combine that with my poor interviewing and dislike of padding my resume, and I can't get hired, although I could probably do a lot of the jobs out there, with minimal training. Anyone in the Milwaukee area need a smart guy who both likes working with computers and is good at it, but doesn't interview well or like dealing with customers?
2013-02-19 02:32:51 PM
1 votes:
What's with the "Please write down your salary expectations?" question ... uhhhhhhhh ... you really want ME to fill in what my salary expectations are? Why don't you tell me what you're willing to offer?

It's like going to a used car dealer without any prices on the car and then expecting someone is going to offer you $10k for a 1986 Yugo with 4 flat tires.

Fail.
2013-02-19 02:27:28 PM
1 votes:

Proletariat In Charge: cefm: How about "don't attempt to negotiate a salary that is CLEARLY outside of the range listed in the written job posting".

It makes me think you didn't read the job description, or you're an idiot, or you're a schemer.  All of these are bad.

You mean, "don't attempt to negotiate a salary that we CLEARLY stated as  competitive".  I rarely see the actual salary range stated in the job posting.


I hate that. All companies do it these days. Probably because they don't want to put in the job description for a Retail Manager, "Must do $250,000 in sales a year" along with "Salary: $25,000 annually". They wouldn't get any people (cept for the really desperate ones, who probably don't have the experience) to apply for the job.
2013-02-19 01:06:37 PM
1 votes:

WordyGrrl: abigsmurf:  Something far worse: sent off loads of applications, got a call asking for me to come in to talk about a job. Got all nervous, prepared for the interview, suit dry cleaned etc.

Did a quick check of the business before I left so I knew what they did... It was an agency. They'd acted like it was an actual job interview just so they could get my name on their books. I was mildly vexed to say the least.

I had the same thing happen, though I didn't find out it was a headhunter agency until I took the day off (without pay) from my temp job for the "interview." After about 30 minutes of "interview chit chat," the gal finally revealed that they were a headhunter agency and wanted to charge me $4,000 for them to find me a job. "Most young people just put it on their credit card," she said.


Wow.  I would have to resist the urge to ask how many people punch them in the face after making such an asinine proposal.
2013-02-19 12:51:48 PM
1 votes:

BarkingUnicorn: nickerj1: It's obvious that article was written by a woman.  "Do you want to take a ride in my car?" wouldn't put me off from an interviewee as I'm a guy. It's kinda weird, but wouldn't be an instant "don't hire them".  If in the interview we got to talking about cars and he asked it, it wouldn't even be weird.

I'm trying to find a job-related reason to ask such a question.


I always put a "Hobbies/activities" section on my resume.  Back in the day, when I was fresh out of college, every single interview brought up my hobbies listed.  Interviewers like to feel out your personality, and it's especially useful for some jobs/companies if you find common ground there.  If the interviewee had "restoring old cars" or "rally racing" or something on there, and I asked them about it, and then they offered to give me a ride in their car, it wouldn't be weird.  I'd probably defer the ride to after they were hired though.
2013-02-19 12:46:12 PM
1 votes:
Basically, it can be summed up as HR sucks.
2013-02-19 12:44:05 PM
1 votes:
Interviewed with a company one time and at the reception desk is a big countdown clock, I asked what is the countdown for?  Apparently a full blown SAP implementation in 6 weeks.  Interviewed with 6 folks that afternoon and the next day.  This was a big company also.  Average tenure about 5 months.  My main would be manager started about 2 weeks before the interview.  His manager had been there about 1 month.  Most of the peer group, 6 months or less.

Met the IT lead for the SAP implementation, consultant, leaving in about 8 weeks

Could not leave fast enough, declined the invitation for final interview

My question should have been "are you all bat shiat crazy or is it just me?"
2013-02-19 12:38:31 PM
1 votes:
6. "Can I set my own hours?"

9. "Do I have to be at work every day?"


These aren't all that strange, when taken in the proper context... Many places are moving to at least a partial tele-commute schedule, and this falls right in line with that. The questions could have been worded better, but I would be surprised if these two questions aren't relatively common.
2013-02-19 12:30:29 PM
1 votes:
How about "don't attempt to negotiate a salary that is CLEARLY outside of the range listed in the written job posting".

It makes me think you didn't read the job description, or you're an idiot, or you're a schemer.  All of these are bad.
2013-02-19 12:27:50 PM
1 votes:

durbnpoisn: After having done a gazillion or so interviews over the past few years, I deffinitely can say what is wrong with the interview process and hiring proctices today...

1.  Too many people lie or exagerate on their resume.  This is a REAL problem.  Because it has gotten companies so untrusting that they will grill you uneccessarily hard to make sure you're not one of those liars.  I've actually had to sit there and write JavaScipt on a pad and paper, or PHP on a white board, and explain how the code works. (Seriously?!)


This isn't helped by insane shopping lists of skills that few people going after low level dev jobs would have (especially for web developers).

"looking for graduate web developer, must know HTML 5, CSS, JS, JQuery, Java, Flash, PHP, VB.net, perl, mysql, mssql, Linux, Windows server, Active Directory, our proprietary CMS. Must have 2 years professional experience"

Someone coming out of university may have half of those skills, a reasonably skilled one around 4/5th. Annoys the hell out of me.
2013-02-19 12:26:20 PM
1 votes:

YodaBlues: durbnpoisn:
1.  Too many people lie or exagerate on their resume.  This is a REAL problem.  Because it has gotten companies so untrusting that they will grill you uneccessarily hard to make sure you're not one of those liars.  I've actually had to sit there and write JavaScipt on a pad and paper, or PHP on a white board, and explain how the code works. (Seriously?!)

Software companies do this not only to verify you actually understand how to code, but also to see how you think about coding. I can't freehand code to save my life, but I understand the proper way to sort an array or execute a SQL statement and being able to explain what I was trying to accomplish is just as important to them as being to memorize a languages' API and syntax.


I'm always a bit skeptical when someone can freehand a complete, useful program on a whiteboard with absolutely no syntax errors. I've found that in the majority of cases, extreme book-smarts generally translates to "mostly useless when dealing with real-world problems" (there are exceptions, of course).
2013-02-19 12:23:28 PM
1 votes:
durbnpoisn:
1.  Too many people lie or exagerate on their resume.  This is a REAL problem.  Because it has gotten companies so untrusting that they will grill you uneccessarily hard to make sure you're not one of those liars.  I've actually had to sit there and write JavaScipt on a pad and paper, or PHP on a white board, and explain how the code works. (Seriously?!)

Software companies do this not only to verify you actually understand how to code, but also to see how you think about coding. I can't freehand code to save my life, but I understand the proper way to sort an array or execute a SQL statement and being able to explain what I was trying to accomplish is just as important to them as being to memorize a languages' API and syntax.
2013-02-19 12:19:25 PM
1 votes:

Cuyose: I am going through this right now and it really is ridiculous.  There are a few recruiting companies that really seem to care and have good relationships with many area employees, but I would love to see some documentary on how some of these resume mills make their money.


It's really fascinating, especially in IT. A few months ago, I went through a recruiting agency for software development and the agency I used was actually interested in matching my skillset with what employers are looking for. They got me a nice job that I genuinely enjoy.

A different agency pretty much told me to lie on my resume to up-sell my Oracle skills, even though my only experience with PL/SQL was one class in college 2 years ago. Everything since then had been MS SQL/T-SQL. While the languages are similar, there still a huge gap between knowing the ins and outs of SQL server and Oracle. He wanted me to make all these changes to my resume, add focus to tech that I only had marginal experience with.

After the call, I just blocked his number. Google voice is awesome. Here's a protip:  NEVER POST YOUR REAL PHONE NUMBER TO A CAREER WEBSITE.

/Number was posted to Hotjobs, Careerbuilder, etc etc.
//Leave it on Do not disturb.
2013-02-19 11:44:13 AM
1 votes:
FTA "Did some of these questions surprise you? I know I was surprised as I read through this list, which was compiled by OfficeTeam, an administrative staffing company."

Temp agency. Enough said. Those places tend to draw in some true morons, so I'm not too surprised by these 10 questions.
2013-02-19 11:43:56 AM
1 votes:

WTFDYW: Invisible Dynamite Monkey: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

Not a millennial here but I'm not going to work at a company that doesn't give me flexible hours. Not spending an extra hour a day in my car so I can be at work at a certain time. I'm either in early and out early or in late and out late. I have better things to do. Sometimes that includes learning things for my profession in my free time. I also know there's always someone else who will be flexible for me.

/jobs that have been flexible with my time, I've been flexible with their time.

Sorry pal. You aren'r so speacial that we have to dance around your schedule. THe company doesn't depend on YOU and you alone. Get over it and keep job hopping.


I spend an evening or two a month at professional group meet ups relating to my profession.  I work on my own projects in my spare time that are often directly relatable to work.  My employer gets things from me outside of the standard 8.5 hour day.  And if some place isn't going to give me the flexibility to start and end my day +/-2 hours from the standard day someone else will.  The biggest mistake I ever made early in my career was thinking I couldn't do better in my career.  Until the economy goes to crap for my profession I'm going to ride it for what it's worth.
2013-02-19 11:30:19 AM
1 votes:

DarkVader: GalFriday: WhippingBoy: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

Sounds like the poor girl had a debilitating mental illness and was trying her best.
At least you get to feel superior to her, and show the internet how cool you are.

Bring it on ITG!

What I had was a highly educated and well-trained serologist in front of me.  There was nothing mentally wrong with her other than her crippling immaturity.

A scientist lacking people skills?  UNPOSSIBLE!

Chances are, you either gave up an incredible asset to your team, or dodged a massive bullet.  I doubt there's much middle ground there.


I have NEVER hired a scientist for their people skills, I expect them to have little to no social skills.  These people very rarely interact with each other, let alone the rest of the office and NEVER the clients.  But, if she is going to cry when she has to interview without her dad there, what is she doing to do if she has to give testimony in open court, or even closed court where her father most certainly would not be allowed?

I think I dodged a bullet.
2013-02-19 11:27:32 AM
1 votes:
This is a tough one because I know that instant feedback is always appreciated, but asking this question during an interview is really taboo.

Maybe the question is taboo, but godammit, interviewers should really give the interviewee at least a hint on how well it went, and not that subtle of one. I know there are some standard hints, but in a better world, the interviewee would pretty well know what the opinion upon leaving.
2013-02-19 11:18:23 AM
1 votes:

poot_rootbeer: xalres: I've sworn off dealing with recruiters with a face to face requirement because more often than not it's a massive waste of time. You waste the time and gas to get to their offices, waste $8 - $15 to park in the parking structure because they don't validate, only to have a 5 minute conversation with the head recruiter about your career goals before they sit you in a room and have different guys come in and pitch jobs at you that either don't meet your requirements (salary, location, contract instead of full-perm) or you're unqualified for (I'm looking for a .NET position, what makes you think I can also program in Java? Is it in my resume?).

You forgot the part where you have to sit in the lobby transcribing information off your resume onto a poorly designed paper form for a half hour before the receptionist will even tell the recruiter that you're there.

Never again.


RRRRRRAAAAAAAAAAGE!!!!!

Ahem...yeah I totally forgot about that part. They have a printer and an electronic copy of my resume don't they? What's the point of doing that?

Not really looking forward to starting that whole process again but...ehhhh just eff this place.
2013-02-19 11:15:11 AM
1 votes:

over_and_done: The honeymoon night for a pair of millennials involves up to 4 parents, all heaping praise on their fragile snowflakes.


Given the prevalence of divorce and remarriage, the honeymoon could likely involve more than 4 parents.
2013-02-19 10:58:50 AM
1 votes:

GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.


You did check he wasn't there because of health issues first right? If he was there acting as a helper, you'll have given her a pretty horrible experience.

"and she had this white cane and didn't remove her sunglasses to meet me! I kicked her right out into the street and she just started sobbing quietly! Serves her right for being so rude!"
2013-02-19 10:57:55 AM
1 votes:

Girion47: BarkingUnicorn: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

Sounds like you violated the ADA. ;-)  Disabled people are allowed to have helpers during job interviews.

You would think they would arrange that prior to the interview if they were going down that route.  She can't really violate the ADA if she wasn't notified of the disability.


She answered "no" to the legally stated ADA question and disclaimer.
2013-02-19 10:52:11 AM
1 votes:

nickerj1: Also, the flexible schedule question is quite reasonable.  There's no reason not to have flex schedules in this modern world unless your jobs requires you to directly interact with customers.


I expect the question wasn't "do you have flexible work hours", but rather something along the lines of "I'm not planning on coming in Mondays or Fridays. You'd better not have a problem with that".
2013-02-19 10:51:30 AM
1 votes:

BarkingUnicorn: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

Sounds like you violated the ADA. ;-)  Disabled people are allowed to have helpers during job interviews.


You would think they would arrange that prior to the interview if they were going down that route.  She can't really violate the ADA if she wasn't notified of the disability.
2013-02-19 10:46:22 AM
1 votes:

abigsmurf: doczoidberg: I remember when I was looking for a new job, I sent out so many resumes and applications that I couldn't even remember them all.

Once or twice, I got called to an interview not knowing what the hell the position even was.

I didn't get those jobs.

Something far worse: sent off loads of applications, got a call asking for me to come in to talk about a job. Got all nervous, prepared for the interview, suit dry cleaned etc.

Did a quick check of the business before I left so I knew what they did... It was an agency. They'd acted like it was an actual job interview just so they could get my name on their books. I was mildly vexed to say the least.


I friggin hate it when they do that. I've sworn off dealing with recruiters with a face to face requirement because more often than not it's a massive waste of time. You waste the time and gas to get to their offices, waste $8 - $15 to park in the parking structure because they don't validate, only to have a 5 minute conversation with the head recruiter about your career goals before they sit you in a room and have different guys come in and pitch jobs at you that either don't meet your requirements (salary, location, contract instead of full-perm) or you're unqualified for (I'm looking for a .NET position, what makes you think I can also program in Java? Is it in my resume?). I really wish I could just work directly with companies but being in IT pretty much means everybody feels like they have to go through an agency.

I had a recruiter who insisted I drive from the San Gabriel Valley to meet with them at their office in Santa Monica after I got off work. He couldn't understand why I balked at spending what promised to be 2 1/2 hours in rush hour L.A. traffic just to have a 30 minute meeting. I had to hang up on him because he wouldn't take no for an answer.
2013-02-19 10:41:39 AM
1 votes:

GalFriday


I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview. I wouldn't let him and she almost cried. She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.


Frankly I'm surprised you took the time to conduct the interview; I wouldn't have. I'm not sure if there is any level of awesome-at-the-job that would overshadow her ridiculous approach to the process.
2013-02-19 10:41:06 AM
1 votes:

YouSirAreAMaroon: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

Actually the question was regarding location of work, and is completely valid. Less and less jobs require a physical presence in the office 5 days a week.


I've actually asked about a location of a few positions, but this was because the company was building a new main office and some positions were moving to the new building and others were staying in the old building, and in the event I got the position, I wanted to know which building to go to.

In some interviews, the interviewer flat out mentioned the possibilty of flex time, but with some restrictions.  I believe in one case, the person who got the position had to participate in a phone bank one Friday a month and needed to have a certain number of hours in designated "prime time" hours.
2013-02-19 10:37:54 AM
1 votes:

doczoidberg: I remember when I was looking for a new job, I sent out so many resumes and applications that I couldn't even remember them all.

Once or twice, I got called to an interview not knowing what the hell the position even was.

I didn't get those jobs.


I keep a date-stamped directory for every job I've applied for containing a PDF of the ad and the cover letter and resume that I submitted. If the application required an online form I save screenshots of that as well. Each directory is color coded to reflect how far along in the process I got, e.g., sent application, automatic acknowledgement, human acknowledgement, request for more information, phone interview, face-to-face interview, etc. (It's easy to stay organized when you have nothing else to do all day.)

Not only does this make it easy for me to recall what I applied for and when, but I also know which companies never sent any acknowledgement at all, so I can resend an application, and/or boycott them forever.

/This also proves useful when you're supposed to write one of those "what are your job responsibilities" things for management. Just go to the ad you saved from when you applied and work from there.
2013-02-19 10:27:44 AM
1 votes:

Invisible Dynamite Monkey: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

Not a millennial here but I'm not going to work at a company that doesn't give me flexible hours. Not spending an extra hour a day in my car so I can be at work at a certain time. I'm either in early and out early or in late and out late. I have better things to do. Sometimes that includes learning things for my profession in my free time. I also know there's always someone else who will be flexible for me.

/jobs that have been flexible with my time, I've been flexible with their time.


Unofficial flexibility is great.  Maybe I don't want to take half an hour for lunch, I'd rather get in at 8, leave at 4.   If I get hungry I can eat at my desk and not slow work down, a granola bar doesn't take 30 minutes to eat.
2013-02-19 10:26:16 AM
1 votes:

Invisible Dynamite Monkey: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

Not a millennial here but I'm not going to work at a company that doesn't give me flexible hours. Not spending an extra hour a day in my car so I can be at work at a certain time. I'm either in early and out early or in late and out late. I have better things to do. Sometimes that includes learning things for my profession in my free time. I also know there's always someone else who will be flexible for me.

/jobs that have been flexible with my time, I've been flexible with their time.


Sorry pal. You aren'r so speacial that we have to dance around your schedule. THe company doesn't depend on YOU and you alone. Get over it and keep job hopping.
2013-02-19 10:25:29 AM
1 votes:

GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.


Sounds like the poor girl had a debilitating mental illness and was trying her best.
At least you get to feel superior to her, and show the internet how cool you are.
2013-02-19 10:24:23 AM
1 votes:

GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.


You should hire her dad.
2013-02-19 10:22:08 AM
1 votes:

GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.


That's a new level of crazy.
2013-02-19 10:00:32 AM
1 votes:

HotIgneous Intruder: People still get job interviews?
That's a bizarre idea.
I thought there was a massive shortage of skilled, qualified workers in the US and A.


There is.  That's why we're interviewing...
2013-02-19 09:58:39 AM
1 votes:

brobdiggy: True story:

Job candidate on the morning of his interview:  "Something happened last night, and now I'm in jail.  I'll be late for the interview."


I'd hire him. I like employees with an edge.
2013-02-19 09:56:29 AM
1 votes:
I remember when I was looking for a new job, I sent out so many resumes and applications that I couldn't even remember them all.

Once or twice, I got called to an interview not knowing what the hell the position even was.

I didn't get those jobs.
2013-02-19 08:53:26 AM
1 votes:
*points to a picture on the interviewers desk* Who's the coont?
 
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