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(Mother Nature Network)   "Do you want to take a ride in my new car," "Do I have to be at work every day," "Could I get a pay advance," and other questions you should never ask during a job interview   (mnn.com) divider line 198
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9747 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Feb 2013 at 9:46 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-19 01:41:35 PM  

Girion47: BarkingUnicorn: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

Sounds like you violated the ADA. ;-)  Disabled people are allowed to have helpers during job interviews.

You would think they would arrange that prior to the interview if they were going down that route.  She can't really violate the ADA if she wasn't notified of the disability.


But they can still get the lab to cut a check for denting her delicate psyche...
 
2013-02-19 01:44:10 PM  

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: After hours, who says it;s restricted to the restroom?


I like you - thanks for the lulz.

Related subject: I just got back from an interview for an IT job. It went pretty well. I did NOT ask for the busty receptionist's number, so at least I got that going for me.
 
2013-02-19 01:51:01 PM  

CtrlAltDestroy: The current 30-50 somethings don't get to biatch about the current teen and 20 somethings. You and your peers raised them.

/Not that every generation doesn't complain about every following generation anyway.
//Interviews as a tradesman sound easier than those in the business world.
///Grateful for that.


I'm 35 years old.  I didn't raise any of these 'em.
 
2013-02-19 01:51:04 PM  

xalres: abigsmurf: doczoidberg: I remember when I was looking for a new job, I sent out so many resumes and applications that I couldn't even remember them all.

Once or twice, I got called to an interview not knowing what the hell the position even was.

I didn't get those jobs.

Something far worse: sent off loads of applications, got a call asking for me to come in to talk about a job. Got all nervous, prepared for the interview, suit dry cleaned etc.

Did a quick check of the business before I left so I knew what they did... It was an agency. They'd acted like it was an actual job interview just so they could get my name on their books. I was mildly vexed to say the least.

I friggin hate it when they do that. I've sworn off dealing with recruiters with a face to face requirement because more often than not it's a massive waste of time. You waste the time and gas to get to their offices, waste $8 - $15 to park in the parking structure because they don't validate, only to have a 5 minute conversation with the head recruiter about your career goals before they sit you in a room and have different guys come in and pitch jobs at you that either don't meet your requirements (salary, location, contract instead of full-perm) or you're unqualified for (I'm looking for a .NET position, what makes you think I can also program in Java? Is it in my resume?). I really wish I could just work directly with companies but being in IT pretty much means everybody feels like they have to go through an agency.

I had a recruiter who insisted I drive from the San Gabriel Valley to meet with them at their office in Santa Monica after I got off work. He couldn't understand why I balked at spending what promised to be 2 1/2 hours in rush hour L.A. traffic just to have a 30 minute meeting. I had to hang up on him because he wouldn't take no for an answer.


The face to face requirement is typically to weed out anyone fishing for relocation or a visa or something.  Recruiters HATE it when a candidate springs that on the client after being submitted for consideration.

Yes, it's bullshiat and I also hate it.  Just saying there is a reason they do it.
 
2013-02-19 02:00:13 PM  

WhippingBoy: Girion47: Mikey1969: 6. "Can I set my own hours?"

9. "Do I have to be at work every day?"

These aren't all that strange, when taken in the proper context... Many places are moving to at least a partial tele-commute schedule, and this falls right in line with that. The questions could have been worded better, but I would be surprised if these two questions aren't relatively common.

The last time I've been to my company's office was 13 months ago.  All of our work is done on the clients' sites and then the rest of the time we're doing database updating.

I've never seen my company's office, and have never met my boss in person.


Sounds like your boss is sitting in his dark office right now stroking a white cat.
 
2013-02-19 02:02:54 PM  

DarkSoulNoHope: WhippingBoy: Girion47: Mikey1969: 6. "Can I set my own hours?"

9. "Do I have to be at work every day?"

These aren't all that strange, when taken in the proper context... Many places are moving to at least a partial tele-commute schedule, and this falls right in line with that. The questions could have been worded better, but I would be surprised if these two questions aren't relatively common.

The last time I've been to my company's office was 13 months ago.  All of our work is done on the clients' sites and then the rest of the time we're doing database updating.

I've never seen my company's office, and have never met my boss in person.

Sounds like your boss is sitting in his dark office right now stroking a white cat.


At least we hope it's a cat. We can't see under his desk from here.
 
2013-02-19 02:10:38 PM  

Girion47: Invisible Dynamite Monkey: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

Not a millennial here but I'm not going to work at a company that doesn't give me flexible hours. Not spending an extra hour a day in my car so I can be at work at a certain time. I'm either in early and out early or in late and out late. I have better things to do. Sometimes that includes learning things for my profession in my free time. I also know there's always someone else who will be flexible for me.

/jobs that have been flexible with my time, I've been flexible with their time.

Unofficial flexibility is great.  Maybe I don't want to take half an hour for lunch, I'd rather get in at 8, leave at 4.   If I get hungry I can eat at my desk and not slow work down, a granola bar doesn't take 30 minutes to eat.


THIS. My office used to have a strict "start at 7:30, leave at 4:30" rule, but eventually it got a lot more flexible. My assistant, a fantastic engineer, just cannot come in at her scheduled 8:00 in the morning if her life depended on it. She works over in the evening to make up the time though, and does enough work for two people, so it doesn't bother me.

Had one woman interview for an engineering position, and when I asked her if she had designed an interchange before (this is a highway design position, btw), she asks "what is an interchange?". She didn't get the job...
 
2013-02-19 02:20:26 PM  

Bendal: Had one woman interview for an engineering position, and when I asked her if she had designed an interchange before (this is a highway design position, btw), she asks "what is an interchange?". She didn't get the job...


That's scary.
 
2013-02-19 02:27:28 PM  

Proletariat In Charge: cefm: How about "don't attempt to negotiate a salary that is CLEARLY outside of the range listed in the written job posting".

It makes me think you didn't read the job description, or you're an idiot, or you're a schemer.  All of these are bad.

You mean, "don't attempt to negotiate a salary that we CLEARLY stated as  competitive".  I rarely see the actual salary range stated in the job posting.


I hate that. All companies do it these days. Probably because they don't want to put in the job description for a Retail Manager, "Must do $250,000 in sales a year" along with "Salary: $25,000 annually". They wouldn't get any people (cept for the really desperate ones, who probably don't have the experience) to apply for the job.
 
2013-02-19 02:32:51 PM  
What's with the "Please write down your salary expectations?" question ... uhhhhhhhh ... you really want ME to fill in what my salary expectations are? Why don't you tell me what you're willing to offer?

It's like going to a used car dealer without any prices on the car and then expecting someone is going to offer you $10k for a 1986 Yugo with 4 flat tires.

Fail.
 
2013-02-19 02:42:45 PM  
I always thought the correct answer when someone asks of salary expectations was to say "Open".

Although, I have had my share of times when that answer didn't cut the mustard, and I had to actually give a number.  In those cases, I would say, "Well, my last position I was making $suchAndSuch", and start from there.

$suchAndSuch > $myActualSalary, unless there was no way they could do that.
 
2013-02-19 02:44:09 PM  

FizixJunkee: I'm 35 years old.  I didn't raise any of these 'em.


Maybe not. But as I did say in that post, your peers did. No tree, no apple to fall from it.

/Gen Y/Millennial
//Doing well for myself, professionally.
 
2013-02-19 02:44:44 PM  
Salary expectations? I usual write either a) the advertised pay if there is one, or b) the state minimum wage.
 
2013-02-19 02:53:28 PM  

ThatGuyFromTheInternet: Salary expectations? I usual write either a) the advertised pay if there is one, or b) the state minimum wage.


Why would you put minimum wage when you know the job is worth (for example) 13-18 dollars per hour? That's just lowballing yourself.
 
2013-02-19 02:53:53 PM  

durbnpoisn: I always thought the correct answer when someone asks of salary expectations was to say "Open".

Although, I have had my share of times when that answer didn't cut the mustard, and I had to actually give a number.  In those cases, I would say, "Well, my last position I was making $suchAndSuch", and start from there.

$suchAndSuch > $myActualSalary, unless there was no way they could do that.


I agree with this. With companies eliminating raises these days and blaming it on phantom hardships (which most likely don't exist when the company newsletter states "3rd Qtr Record Profits!"), you need to over exaggerate your current salary in order to see if you can get a higher one in the new position.
 
2013-02-19 02:54:02 PM  

durbnpoisn: 1.  Too many people lie or exagerate on their resume.


I have the exact opposite problem. I tend to under-estimate my abilities. I'm not too good in interviews (nerves, social anxiety even) and am desperately afraid of being caught out if I pad my resume. But, I'm a quick learner and can figure things out on my own.

Example- I worked a few days for a video transfer place- they digitized VCR tapes onto DVDs. They used a script in Photoshop to import frames of the videos to make chapter listings for the DVD. On one of their 4 machines the script didn't work. I had never used Photoshop, per se, before, much less scripts for it, but I took a look, and found the problem- the paths it was using were wrong. Corrected it and increased their production by 33%!

I like to fool around with automating tasks. One job I had (retail helpdesk), we had to run various SQL commands during yearly inventory to clear the inventory tables and such. I poked around and found 'isql', the command line version. A few batch files and a little Qbasic later, and I had a handy program that could do in seconds what the other techs took a half hour to do.

I'm good with computer hardware too. Built several computers, even a TVPC (it's a 'Home Theater PC', but I don't really have a "home theater", just the TV, so...). A job doing computer repair and custom builds would be great... but I don't deal well with customers directly. (Like many nerds/geeks, I'm socially... awkward. I prefer computers to people.)

Also, I don't have any real 'formal' training. Combine that with my poor interviewing and dislike of padding my resume, and I can't get hired, although I could probably do a lot of the jobs out there, with minimal training. Anyone in the Milwaukee area need a smart guy who both likes working with computers and is good at it, but doesn't interview well or like dealing with customers?
 
2013-02-19 02:59:12 PM  

lackadaisicalfreakshow: ThatGuyFromTheInternet: Salary expectations? I usual write either a) the advertised pay if there is one, or b) the state minimum wage.

Why would you put minimum wage when you know the job is worth (for example) 13-18 dollars per hour? That's just lowballing yourself.


I ain't worth shiat.
 
2013-02-19 03:10:20 PM  
Does this skirt make my dick look fat?
 
2013-02-19 03:13:26 PM  

seadoo2006: What's with the "Please write down your salary expectations?" question ... uhhhhhhhh ... you really want ME to fill in what my salary expectations are? Why don't you tell me what you're willing to offer?

It's like going to a used car dealer without any prices on the car and then expecting someone is going to offer you $10k for a 1986 Yugo with 4 flat tires.

Fail.


This is done so often, you may appear unprepared if you're uncomfortable with the question. When you have a certain range of talent, charisma and experience, there's no need to lowball yourself unless you really really need the job.  Research the market value for similar positions in the area.

/you also have to do your own annual reviews now
 
2013-02-19 03:22:45 PM  
THIS topic makes me grumble, grumble, grumble.

1)  HR people are overpaid word finders.  They don't know shiat about the jobs they post, and if you don't know shiat about it, you shouldn't be in charge of finding someone for it.
     a)  They wanted someone to teach classes to government employees, classes I'm very well accustomed to as I worked for the gov.  They wanted someone with a degree in Education, Psych., or English.
          I have a Master's in Linguistics and used to teach English at a community college and university.  I did not get considered for the job because I did not have the degrees they were looking for.
2)  Apparently, the corporate world finds my previous work as a teacher and manager of a division for a large city inefficient for their "very different work environment."  That's what the lady at the temp
     agency told me.  So, here I am farking around on Fark at my corporate temp job that is so ridiculously easy, I have time to fark around on Fark.  And here is the big difference between the government
     job and the corporation: Money.  The corporation has more money.
 
2013-02-19 03:23:06 PM  
Sim Tree - You might consider making a professional, non-threatening report to send to some of the board members, anyway. Many of them are probably ignorant that this entire thing is taking place.

Which, interestingly enough, is why I see no reason to try that. They live in a bigger bubble than he does, and they do not like people making waves. That's why I thought about what I mentioned. Trust me, you want something to change at your workplace? Get the client base riled up. Nothing gets the brass to alter their way of life like threatening their income. For myself, it is over. I am tired of working myself into an early grave for people who don't give a crap about me except when I am making them look good (and the people who I made them look good to are present, otherwise, I don't even get that). What kills me is their statement that they 'like to 'do things' for their staff. Things like buying cheap snack foods that are overloaded with sugar to make sure we all become diabetics. Things like giving us all stupid little calendar books and other cheap and useless trinkets. I once mentioned that if they wanted to reward us for doing a good job, they could give us a raise. You would have thought I said i was going to run up the hall and gun down the entire staff and then burn down the building. Face it, to be a successful in the business world, you have to be less than human in order to do the disgusting things you have to do to be a success. I am just not that evil, nor do I want to be.

//Still no word on those Seconals?
///a gun would work,  but its looking like I won't be able to get one of those either.
//// figures... can't get a job, can't remove myself from the equation... lovely
 
2013-02-19 03:28:34 PM  

payattention: Sim Tree - You might consider making a professional, non-threatening report to send to some of the board members, anyway. Many of them are probably ignorant that this entire thing is taking place.

Which, interestingly enough, is why I see no reason to try that. They live in a bigger bubble than he does, and they do not like people making waves. That's why I thought about what I mentioned. Trust me, you want something to change at your workplace? Get the client base riled up. Nothing gets the brass to alter their way of life like threatening their income. For myself, it is over. I am tired of working myself into an early grave for people who don't give a crap about me except when I am making them look good (and the people who I made them look good to are present, otherwise, I don't even get that). What kills me is their statement that they 'like to 'do things' for their staff. Things like buying cheap snack foods that are overloaded with sugar to make sure we all become diabetics. Things like giving us all stupid little calendar books and other cheap and useless trinkets. I once mentioned that if they wanted to reward us for doing a good job, they could give us a raise. You would have thought I said i was going to run up the hall and gun down the entire staff and then burn down the building. Face it, to be a successful in the business world, you have to be less than human in order to do the disgusting things you have to do to be a success. I am just not that evil, nor do I want to be.

//Still no word on those Seconals?
///a gun would work,  but its looking like I won't be able to get one of those either.
//// figures... can't get a job, can't remove myself from the equation... lovely


If you really want to die, go hang out in a ghetto, someone will oblige you.
 
2013-02-19 03:44:05 PM  

payattention: Sim Tree - You might consider making a professional, non-threatening report to send to some of the board members, anyway. Many of them are probably ignorant that this entire thing is taking place.

Which, interestingly enough, is why I see no reason to try that. They live in a bigger bubble than he does, and they do not like people making waves. That's why I thought about what I mentioned. Trust me, you want something to change at your workplace? Get the client base riled up. Nothing gets the brass to alter their way of life like threatening their income. For myself, it is over. I am tired of working myself into an early grave for people who don't give a crap about me except when I am making them look good (and the people who I made them look good to are present, otherwise, I don't even get that). What kills me is their statement that they 'like to 'do things' for their staff. Things like buying cheap snack foods that are overloaded with sugar to make sure we all become diabetics. Things like giving us all stupid little calendar books and other cheap and useless trinkets. I once mentioned that if they wanted to reward us for doing a good job, they could give us a raise. You would have thought I said i was going to run up the hall and gun down the entire staff and then burn down the building. Face it, to be a successful in the business world, you have to be less than human in order to do the disgusting things you have to do to be a success. I am just not that evil, nor do I want to be.

//Still no word on those Seconals?
///a gun would work,  but its looking like I won't be able to get one of those either.
//// figures... can't get a job, can't remove myself from the equation... lovely


Seriously, man. Everyone needs to get their information from some source. If the upper management is collectively going rogue to hide something from the board, the board has no way of finding out about it directly. Everything goes through the game of telephone. At least consider it. If you've already lost the job, what would you have to lose from simply telling them why? Consider it an exit interview in reverse.
 
2013-02-19 04:25:10 PM  

Sim Tree


If you've already lost the job, what would you have to lose from simply telling them why? Consider it an exit interview in reverse.


And be sure to provide verifiable corroborating information so you don't look like the bitter loner who just got fired.

The phrase "I have reason to believe that my termination was unlawful in this jurisdiction" may help, too.
 
2013-02-19 04:34:48 PM  
Do I have to wait a whole year before I can take a vacation?
 
2013-02-19 04:44:26 PM  

YodaBlues: mcreadyblue: Having been to Chik's HDQ and seen them open/close meetings with a prayer, I don't think they hire anyone who does not acknowledge Jesus as Lord and Savior.

So that one is a pretty valid question.

Actually it's not, it can be seen as a form religious discrimination in hiring practices and is against the law.


Thats one big reason companies use a recruiter.


I've had recruiters tell me a company is looking for a minority or younger applicant. Saves both me and them time.
 
2013-02-19 04:47:18 PM  
Girion47 - If you really want to die, go hang out in a ghetto, someone will oblige you.

Yep. As a older white guy, that should do the trick. However, I live in an area that the rest of the city feels is 'ghetto'... so I guess I should go to the 'ritzy' section of town. They are mostly gun-toting Republicans and would have no qualms about shooting some 'lefty-looking, non-conformist-acting, librul hippy' in the face. And the irony of it is that's where most of the 'upstanding' people who work where i used to work reside...

Sim Tree - ...what would you have to lose from simply telling them why?

I was informed that I would get a good referral from the boss... the implication was 'as long as you just leave and don't say anything'. I do not have the strength, the knowledge, or the money to challenge these people. Plus, even if I wanted to, how do you think the hiring world is going to look at me once they find out I am trying to take my old employer to court? Would you hire someone that has established that they will go to every applicable agency in the county, state and country if they feel they are being mistreated? Despite the wonderful 'whistle blower' clause making the rounds these days, businesses do not take kindly to people who have done this, regardless of what they may say in public. I appreciate the advice though. And, I might decide to try it. However, these people are all 'cut from the same cloth', so to speak. They will be more likely to defend their own rather than accept some non rich person's account of anything. (the 'poorest' person on that board owns three businesses and just bought his three kids new cars... they are all grown, BTW.)
 
2013-02-19 04:52:47 PM  

WordyGrrl: I had the same thing happen, though I didn't find out it was a headhunter agency until I took the day off (without pay) from my temp job for the "interview." After about 30 minutes of "interview chit chat," the gal finally revealed that they were a headhunter agency and wanted to charge me $4,000 for them to find me a job. "Most young people just put it on their credit card," she said.


Ew, that was a scam. Very similar to the tactic used by certain national dating agencies. Once you pay them, they may or may not do anything to find you a job besides sending you generic job ads. Why bother expending the energy when they've already got your money, and have already demonstrated they're not interested in up-front reputation.
 
2013-02-19 06:04:34 PM  

WhippingBoy: As a straight, white man, the best interviews are, of course, with other straight white men.
The receptionist leads you into the interview room and says "Mr. White, you're 10:00 interview is here". He'll look up, and instantly you'll see the sparkle in his eyes.
As soon as the door is closed, he breaks out the bourbon, and you spend the rest of the "interview" talking about golf or how much you'd both love to bang the receptionist.
Once in a while, you'll talk about work-related stuff (like how he'll get Rajinder or Denise to do all the crap jobs, or how Monday mornings [hangover] and Friday afternoons [happy hour at the titty bar] will be spent in special, offsite "training" sessions).


Bourbon?  I had to settle for cognac at my last interview.  The receptionist even made me wear a condom!

Things just aren't like they used to be.
 
2013-02-19 06:18:09 PM  

WordyGrrl: abigsmurf:  Something far worse: sent off loads of applications, got a call asking for me to come in to talk about a job. Got all nervous, prepared for the interview, suit dry cleaned etc.

Did a quick check of the business before I left so I knew what they did... It was an agency. They'd acted like it was an actual job interview just so they could get my name on their books. I was mildly vexed to say the least.

I had the same thing happen, though I didn't find out it was a headhunter agency until I took the day off (without pay) from my temp job for the "interview." After about 30 minutes of "interview chit chat," the gal finally revealed that they were a headhunter agency and wanted to charge me $4,000 for them to find me a job. "Most young people just put it on their credit card," she said.


Why are you people not checking into the company in advance?  Even if not to weed out scammers, managers like it when you know something about the company when you show up.  You should be researching them as part of your normal interview preparation.
I get recruiter emails a lot, where they have a great job with "one of their clients".  I don't even talk to them on the phone until they send me the name of the company and a specific job description.  (I love when the description they send me is like, "The Software Engineer III develops software solutions with a variety of technologies, communicates with product management, provides time estimates, and is responsible for creating new features as well as supporting existing solutions".  Gee, is that what a software engineer does?)
 
2013-02-19 06:27:18 PM  

durbnpoisn: You go in their database and never leave. I still get calls from Mr. Santa Monica Office, or, as I have him marked in my phone "DO NOT ANSWER! DICKHOLE ALERT!", despite my repeated refusals to work with his company. The "job application" you fill out is most likely so the data entry monkeys who put it into the system only have to work with one format for every applicant.

I've gotten so annoyed by that sort of thing that I write back to the recruiter saying, "Where on my resume does it say I'm anywhere near San Diego, or North Carolina?!"
It's even more amusing when they are offering a 6 month contract. Right... I will relocate my family for a 6 month contract.


I love the guys who email my college address and are like "I found your resume in our database and think you'd be a great fit for this entry level job for $35k/year"  Jesus guys, if you think the resume you got from me in 2004 is indicative of my current skill level, how can I be a "great fit" for any job?
Or: Why would I want to work for the software company that's not smart enough to sort search results by timestamp and/or discard expired documents?
 
2013-02-19 06:33:36 PM  

serial_crusher: WordyGrrl: abigsmurf:  Something far worse: sent off loads of applications, got a call asking for me to come in to talk about a job. Got all nervous, prepared for the interview, suit dry cleaned etc.

Did a quick check of the business before I left so I knew what they did... It was an agency. They'd acted like it was an actual job interview just so they could get my name on their books. I was mildly vexed to say the least.

I had the same thing happen, though I didn't find out it was a headhunter agency until I took the day off (without pay) from my temp job for the "interview." After about 30 minutes of "interview chit chat," the gal finally revealed that they were a headhunter agency and wanted to charge me $4,000 for them to find me a job. "Most young people just put it on their credit card," she said.

Why are you people not checking into the company in advance?  Even if not to weed out scammers, managers like it when you know something about the company when you show up.  You should be researching them as part of your normal interview preparation.


My headhunter encounter happened in the mid-90s, and the company didn't have any sort of internet presence yet. At the time, most of my resumes went out by snail mail to damn near any company advertising in the want ads. But to this day, I refuse to apply to any company with "agency" in the title.
 
2013-02-19 06:37:01 PM  
Some of these are not stupid questions per se, but they're treated as such.

3. "Do you allow midday naps?"

Plenty of people take midday naps at work, without asking, and without making up the time.  I'm guessing the person who asked this was trying to determine if he could take 30 minutes in the afternoon to nap, and then work later, because it made him more productive.  I don't see how that can be a problem, but the mere suggestion of "naps" can get you labelled as lazy.  That's stupid.  The guy didn't ask if it was OK to embezzle.

6. "Can I set my own hours?"

Same basic thing.  I wouldn't assume this means, "Can I just work one hour a day if I want?"  It's more like, is it possible to determine what set of hours is best for everyone?  If you have to work directly with your coworkers, 8 hours a day, then yes you have to work the same hours.  If not, you don't, but some employers still think strictly in the mindset of "be here by 8 at the latest, never leave before 5 at the earliest, no matter what."  Even if there is no reason for it.  The goal ought to be getting the most productivity out of happy employees, not getting everyone to line up their pencils in straight rows on their desks.

7. "What job is this for?"

Sure, you should know what job you're going for.  I have plenty of stories of people who interviewed for a job, were hired, and then found out that they were dropped into an almost completely different, far worse, job.  And the employer didn't see any problem with this.  So although I wouldn't ask, "What job is this for," I would feel comfortable probing to determine just what the job will actually entail, regardless of the blurb.  I had something like this happen to me once; when, 18 months later, I announced I was leaving, my manager was stunned--hurt, even.  "But why would you leave?"  I was able to bring up several points made during our interview, and remind him of the kind of work he told me I would do, and I had reminded him of this several times, and none of it ever happened.  OK he still thought it was "wrong" and "unfair" of me to leave, but I felt a lot better having those points established.

10. "How do you think I did on the interview?"

Again, clearly not a good question to ask.  But it's infuriating when you go through a lengthy interview process, and you never hear anything back from the company.  Not days, not weeks, not months later.  When does an employer ever tolerate that kind of behavior from an employee?  I remember one case where I never heard back from them, and when a couple of pals asked what I thought about other jobs they listed, I shared my story and recommended they stay away.  If they behave that way during the interview process, who knows what they'll do once you're hired and they feel they own you.

Having said all that, I also know that there are a lot of clueless people who say a lot of clueless things in interviews.
 
2013-02-19 07:18:29 PM  
I got a job as a camp counselor after telling the director, upon being asked how I was with children, that I make them cry more often than they should.
 
2013-02-19 07:33:36 PM  

serial_crusher: I love the guys who email my college address and are like "I found your resume in our database and think you'd be a great fit for this entry level job for $35k/year"  Jesus guys, if you think the resume you got from me in 2004 is indicative of my current skill level, how can I be a "great fit" for any job?
Or: Why would I want to work for the software company that's not smart enough to sort search results by timestamp and/or discard expired documents?


Just cause they found your resume doesn't mean they read your resume.
 
2013-02-19 07:53:17 PM  
Can I clean my rifles during lunch time?
 
2013-02-19 08:01:15 PM  

Deep Contact: Can I clean my rifles during lunch time?


If you worked for a guns and ammo store, they would actually like this extra unpaid effort on your part!
 
2013-02-19 08:09:12 PM  

nickerj1: I always put a "Hobbies/activities" section on my resume.


The last guy I interviewed had a hobbies section on his resume and my immediate reaction was "there's no way 'neuroscience' is one of his hobbies."
 
2013-02-19 08:15:25 PM  

GoldenEagle: nickerj1: I always put a "Hobbies/activities" section on my resume.

The last guy I interviewed had a hobbies section on his resume and my immediate reaction was "there's no way 'neuroscience' is one of his hobbies."


You can't really be sure. Was it this guy?

mimg.ugo.com
 
2013-02-19 08:40:02 PM  

Skarekrough: cfreak: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

As an IT worker it amazes me that there are still businesses who think my job is 9 - 5 and then turns around wanting late meetings, weekend work, etc.

This to the n'th degree.

I work a job now where they will dock pay and bonuses if I'm late or leave early.

They wanted me to come in on Saturday and rebuild someone's email.  I told them they would need to schedule their tragedies during business hours otherwise they would need to review their policy regarding my attendance.

If they fire me then so be it.  It's better to get it over now than dance around it and be stressed about it for years before it happens anyway.


Wouldn't getting fired make it much harder to get another job?

Interviewer: Why did you leave your last job.
Candidate: I was fired.
Interviewer: Buh-bye!
 
2013-02-19 08:43:49 PM  

WhippingBoy: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

Sounds like the poor girl had a debilitating mental illness and was trying her best.
At least you get to feel superior to her, and show the internet how cool you are.


Yes. It sounds like social phobia.

I also suffer from social phobia and was long term unemployed because I couldn't sell myself effectively in an interview. In fact I couldn't even get an interview because I couldn't talk to anyone on the phone. I finally got treatment and then a job.

A lot of people assumed I was just a slacker who didn't want to work.
 
2013-02-19 08:49:10 PM  

DarkSoulNoHope: Other disastrous questions to ask during a job interview:

"I got fired for not making my sales goal at my previous job, does this disqualify me from consideration?"

"Are you a company that tells me I work weekdays only, but will you still ask me to come in for Saturday and Sunday work and late night meetings, even when you know I will have other plans?"

(Chick Fil-A Interview) "Is it alright that I'm Jewish?"

(Synagogue Volunteer Interview) "Is it alright that I'm Muslim?"

(Hot Topic Interview) "Well I'm not comfortable to come here and need to ask for a job, but I have to know first, is it too much to hope for that you get some *real* Goth music CDs on those shelves once in a while?!"

(Muslim School Interview) "So, have you accepted Christ as your lord and savior?"


One more...

"errr, ya couldn't lend me fifty bucks could ya maaaate?"
 
2013-02-19 08:53:46 PM  

nickerj1: It's obvious that article was written by a woman.


The big "Melissa" in the article headline next to a sketch of the author must have tipped you off, eh?
 
2013-02-19 08:57:33 PM  

kg2095: Skarekrough: cfreak: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

As an IT worker it amazes me that there are still businesses who think my job is 9 - 5 and then turns around wanting late meetings, weekend work, etc.

This to the n'th degree.

I work a job now where they will dock pay and bonuses if I'm late or leave early.

They wanted me to come in on Saturday and rebuild someone's email.  I told them they would need to schedule their tragedies during business hours otherwise they would need to review their policy regarding my attendance.

If they fire me then so be it.  It's better to get it over now than dance around it and be stressed about it for years before it happens anyway.

Wouldn't getting fired make it much harder to get another job?

Interviewer: Why did you leave your last job.
Candidate: I was fired.
Interviewer: Buh-bye!


When you have all day to look for a new job and can be available for an interview and have all the extra time to add new skills to your resume.....eh, not nearly the hindrance you might suspect.

And the conversation scenario you set up....it's a nice fantasy.  As a headhunter you are required to come to the table with a certain number of candidates for them to pick from so it behooves you to be nice to potential candidates.  Even if the candidates don't work out you never know if something will come across your desk the next day, next week, or next month or year for which they are a perfect match.  So even if the departure wasn't under the best conditions it is in the best interest to keep you in their good graces.

So, back to the fryolator with you.  There's alot there to digest so try and not to ignore the buzzer and don't forget your hairnet.
 
2013-02-19 09:40:51 PM  

abigsmurf: durbnpoisn: After having done a gazillion or so interviews over the past few years, I deffinitely can say what is wrong with the interview process and hiring proctices today...

1.  Too many people lie or exagerate on their resume.  This is a REAL problem.  Because it has gotten companies so untrusting that they will grill you uneccessarily hard to make sure you're not one of those liars.  I've actually had to sit there and write JavaScipt on a pad and paper, or PHP on a white board, and explain how the code works. (Seriously?!)

This isn't helped by insane shopping lists of skills that few people going after low level dev jobs would have (especially for web developers).

"looking for graduate web developer, must know HTML 5, CSS, JS, JQuery, Java, Flash, PHP, VB.net, perl, mysql, mssql, Linux, Windows server, Active Directory, our proprietary CMS. Must have 2 years professional experience"

Someone coming out of university may have half of those skills, a reasonably skilled one around 4/5th. Annoys the hell out of me.


Don't forget the classic: Must have 5+ years experience with Visual Studio 2012
 
2013-02-19 09:48:24 PM  

Max Awesome: Does this skirt make my dick look fat?


You need to dress conservatively for a job interview. Your skirt should not be so short that your dick is visible.
 
2013-02-19 09:55:12 PM  

Skarekrough: kg2095: Skarekrough: cfreak: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

As an IT worker it amazes me that there are still businesses who think my job is 9 - 5 and then turns around wanting late meetings, weekend work, etc.

This to the n'th degree.

I work a job now where they will dock pay and bonuses if I'm late or leave early.

They wanted me to come in on Saturday and rebuild someone's email.  I told them they would need to schedule their tragedies during business hours otherwise they would need to review their policy regarding my attendance.

If they fire me then so be it.  It's better to get it over now than dance around it and be stressed about it for years before it happens anyway.

Wouldn't getting fired make it much harder to get another job?

Interviewer: Why did you leave your last job.
Candidate: I was fired.
Interviewer: Buh-bye!

When you have all day to look for a new job and can be available for an interview and have all the extra time to add new skills to your resume.....eh, not nearly the hindrance you might suspect.

And the conversation scenario you set up....it's a nice fantasy.  As a headhunter you are required to come to the table with a certain number of candidates for them to pick from so it behooves you to be nice to potential candidates.  Even if the candidates don't work out you never know if something will come across your desk the next day, next week, or next month or year for which they are a perfect match.  So even if the departure wasn't under the best conditions it is in the best interest to keep you in their good graces.

So, back to the fryolator with you.  There's alot there to digest so try and not to ignore the buzzer and don't forget your hairnet.


Wow. You're tough.
 
2013-02-19 10:21:25 PM  

kg2095: Skarekrough: kg2095: Skarekrough: cfreak: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

As an IT worker it amazes me that there are still businesses who think my job is 9 - 5 and then turns around wanting late meetings, weekend work, etc.

This to the n'th degree.

I work a job now where they will dock pay and bonuses if I'm late or leave early.

They wanted me to come in on Saturday and rebuild someone's email.  I told them they would need to schedule their tragedies during business hours otherwise they would need to review their policy regarding my attendance.

If they fire me then so be it.  It's better to get it over now than dance around it and be stressed about it for years before it happens anyway.

Wouldn't getting fired make it much harder to get another job?

Interviewer: Why did you leave your last job.
Candidate: I was fired.
Interviewer: Buh-bye!

When you have all day to look for a new job and can be available for an interview and have all the extra time to add new skills to your resume.....eh, not nearly the hindrance you might suspect.

And the conversation scenario you set up....it's a nice fantasy.  As a headhunter you are required to come to the table with a certain number of candidates for them to pick from so it behooves you to be nice to potential candidates.  Even if the candidates don't work out you never know if something will come across your desk the next day, next week, or next month or year for which they are a perfect match.  So even if the departure wasn't under the best conditions it is in the best interest to keep you in their good graces.

So, back to the fryolator with you.  There's alot there to digest so try and not to ignore the buzzer and don't forget your hairnet.

Wow. You're tough.


*nods*

Internet tough.....
 
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