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(Mother Nature Network)   "Do you want to take a ride in my new car," "Do I have to be at work every day," "Could I get a pay advance," and other questions you should never ask during a job interview   (mnn.com) divider line 198
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9744 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Feb 2013 at 9:46 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-19 10:28:37 AM

GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.


Dad is sick of supporting her and told her that he wants to critique her interviewing skills by sitting in on the interview?

/All I got
 
2013-02-19 10:29:19 AM
Does this look infected?
 
2013-02-19 10:29:44 AM

Mentat: Is masturbating in the restroom frowned upon?  What about after hours?


After hours, who says it;s restricted to the restroom?
 
2013-02-19 10:30:09 AM

texdent: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

That's a new level of crazy.


The term now is "velcro parent"; "helicopter parent" involves more hovering protectively at a slight disance
 
2013-02-19 10:32:02 AM

GalFriday: thisisyourbrainonFark: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

You should hire her dad.

He was dressed for an interview.  Suit and tie, polished shoes, the whole bit.  Now, if I only knew if had a background in serology...


I had my dad take me to an interview last year, I had to fly in to my hometown for it, and instead of costing the company money by getting me a rental or taking a cab, my dad picked me up from the airport, I took him to lunch, and then he dropped me off at the curb and picked me up 3 hours later.

I ended up turning them down.   I could tell their corporate culture was going to cause me headaches.  They were more interested in safety to cover their ass rather than help their baseline employees.  Not only that one of the interviewers tried, sadly, to intimidate me by telling me he used to work for the Secret Service....whoop-di-dooo
 
2013-02-19 10:32:18 AM

TheGogmagog: Sybarite: *points to a picture on the interviewers desk* Who's the coont?

Bonus if it's the HR person interviewing you?


Double bonus if it's a woman and you follow up with "So how does that work, like scissors or something?"
 
2013-02-19 10:33:42 AM
The current 30-50 somethings don't get to biatch about the current teen and 20 somethings. You and your peers raised them.

/Not that every generation doesn't complain about every following generation anyway.
//Interviews as a tradesman sound easier than those in the business world.
///Grateful for that.
 
2013-02-19 10:33:46 AM

WhippingBoy: Invisible Dynamite Monkey: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

Not a millennial here but I'm not going to work at a company that doesn't give me flexible hours. Not spending an extra hour a day in my car so I can be at work at a certain time. I'm either in early and out early or in late and out late. I have better things to do. Sometimes that includes learning things for my profession in my free time. I also know there's always someone else who will be flexible for me.

/jobs that have been flexible with my time, I've been flexible with their time.

You're in luck! Wendy's offers "flexible hours for flexible people".


I have a few openings for flexible people. Well actually I have the positions available--you'll be the one supplying the openings...
 
2013-02-19 10:37:33 AM
Other disastrous questions to ask during a job interview:

"I got fired for not making my sales goal at my previous job, does this disqualify me from consideration?"

"Are you a company that tells me I work weekdays only, but will you still ask me to come in for Saturday and Sunday work and late night meetings, even when you know I will have other plans?"

(Chick Fil-A Interview) "Is it alright that I'm Jewish?"

(Synagogue Volunteer Interview) "Is it alright that I'm Muslim?"

(Hot Topic Interview) "Well I'm not comfortable to come here and need to ask for a job, but I have to know first, is it too much to hope for that you get some *real* Goth music CDs on those shelves once in a while?!"

(Muslim School Interview) "So, have you accepted Christ as your lord and savior?"
 
2013-02-19 10:37:36 AM

CtrlAltDestroy: The current 30-50 somethings don't get to biatch about the current teen and 20 somethings. You and your peers raised them.


*I* didn't raise them. I was at the bar most of the time. Blame their mothers.
 
2013-02-19 10:37:54 AM

doczoidberg: I remember when I was looking for a new job, I sent out so many resumes and applications that I couldn't even remember them all.

Once or twice, I got called to an interview not knowing what the hell the position even was.

I didn't get those jobs.


I keep a date-stamped directory for every job I've applied for containing a PDF of the ad and the cover letter and resume that I submitted. If the application required an online form I save screenshots of that as well. Each directory is color coded to reflect how far along in the process I got, e.g., sent application, automatic acknowledgement, human acknowledgement, request for more information, phone interview, face-to-face interview, etc. (It's easy to stay organized when you have nothing else to do all day.)

Not only does this make it easy for me to recall what I applied for and when, but I also know which companies never sent any acknowledgement at all, so I can resend an application, and/or boycott them forever.

/This also proves useful when you're supposed to write one of those "what are your job responsibilities" things for management. Just go to the ad you saved from when you applied and work from there.
 
2013-02-19 10:38:01 AM

WhippingBoy: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

Sounds like the poor girl had a debilitating mental illness and was trying her best.
At least you get to feel superior to her, and show the internet how cool you are.


Thanks for the armchair diagnosis, Doctor...(rolls eyes)
 
2013-02-19 10:40:06 AM

WhippingBoy: Invisible Dynamite Monkey: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

Not a millennial here but I'm not going to work at a company that doesn't give me flexible hours. Not spending an extra hour a day in my car so I can be at work at a certain time. I'm either in early and out early or in late and out late. I have better things to do. Sometimes that includes learning things for my profession in my free time. I also know there's always someone else who will be flexible for me.

/jobs that have been flexible with my time, I've been flexible with their time.

You're in luck! Wendy's offers "flexible hours for flexible people".


Systems engineer.  Flexibility is pretty much the norm in the technology world.
 
2013-02-19 10:41:06 AM

YouSirAreAMaroon: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

Actually the question was regarding location of work, and is completely valid. Less and less jobs require a physical presence in the office 5 days a week.


I've actually asked about a location of a few positions, but this was because the company was building a new main office and some positions were moving to the new building and others were staying in the old building, and in the event I got the position, I wanted to know which building to go to.

In some interviews, the interviewer flat out mentioned the possibilty of flex time, but with some restrictions.  I believe in one case, the person who got the position had to participate in a phone bank one Friday a month and needed to have a certain number of hours in designated "prime time" hours.
 
2013-02-19 10:41:38 AM
This was asked of me once.

Applicant: 'if' I pass my drug test will I ever have to pass another one?
 
2013-02-19 10:41:39 AM

GalFriday


I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview. I wouldn't let him and she almost cried. She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.


Frankly I'm surprised you took the time to conduct the interview; I wouldn't have. I'm not sure if there is any level of awesome-at-the-job that would overshadow her ridiculous approach to the process.
 
2013-02-19 10:44:14 AM

WhippingBoy: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

Sounds like the poor girl had a debilitating mental illness and was trying her best.
At least you get to feel superior to her, and show the internet how cool you are.


Bring it on ITG!

What I had was a highly educated and well-trained serologist in front of me.  There was nothing mentally wrong with her other than her crippling immaturity.
 
2013-02-19 10:44:30 AM

Fear the Clam: I keep a date-stamped directory for every job I've applied for containing a PDF of the ad and the cover letter and resume that I submitted. If the application required an online form I save screenshots of that as well. Each directory is color coded to reflect how far along in the process I got, e.g., sent application, automatic acknowledgement, human acknowledgement, request for more information, phone interview, face-to-face interview, etc. (It's easy to stay organized when you have nothing else to do all day.)

Not only does this make it easy for me to recall what I applied for and when, but I also know which companies never sent any acknowledgement at all, so I can resend an application, and/or boycott them forever.

/This also proves useful when you're supposed to write one of those "what are your job responsibilities" things for management. Just go to the ad you saved from when you applied and work from there.


I do something similar, but not as detailed
 
2013-02-19 10:44:45 AM

Englebert Slaptyback: GalFriday

I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview. I wouldn't let him and she almost cried. She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.


Frankly I'm surprised you took the time to conduct the interview; I wouldn't have. I'm not sure if there is any level of awesome-at-the-job that would overshadow her ridiculous approach to the process.


If it was a technical position without client interaction, I could see going through with it, maybe she's highly functional but just has poor social skills.
 
2013-02-19 10:46:22 AM

abigsmurf: doczoidberg: I remember when I was looking for a new job, I sent out so many resumes and applications that I couldn't even remember them all.

Once or twice, I got called to an interview not knowing what the hell the position even was.

I didn't get those jobs.

Something far worse: sent off loads of applications, got a call asking for me to come in to talk about a job. Got all nervous, prepared for the interview, suit dry cleaned etc.

Did a quick check of the business before I left so I knew what they did... It was an agency. They'd acted like it was an actual job interview just so they could get my name on their books. I was mildly vexed to say the least.


I friggin hate it when they do that. I've sworn off dealing with recruiters with a face to face requirement because more often than not it's a massive waste of time. You waste the time and gas to get to their offices, waste $8 - $15 to park in the parking structure because they don't validate, only to have a 5 minute conversation with the head recruiter about your career goals before they sit you in a room and have different guys come in and pitch jobs at you that either don't meet your requirements (salary, location, contract instead of full-perm) or you're unqualified for (I'm looking for a .NET position, what makes you think I can also program in Java? Is it in my resume?). I really wish I could just work directly with companies but being in IT pretty much means everybody feels like they have to go through an agency.

I had a recruiter who insisted I drive from the San Gabriel Valley to meet with them at their office in Santa Monica after I got off work. He couldn't understand why I balked at spending what promised to be 2 1/2 hours in rush hour L.A. traffic just to have a 30 minute meeting. I had to hang up on him because he wouldn't take no for an answer.
 
2013-02-19 10:48:39 AM

GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.


Sounds like you violated the ADA. ;-)  Disabled people are allowed to have helpers during job interviews.
 
2013-02-19 10:48:39 AM
It's obvious that article was written by a woman.  "Do you want to take a ride in my car?" wouldn't put me off from an interviewee as I'm a guy. It's kinda weird, but wouldn't be an instant "don't hire them".  If in the interview we got to talking about cars and he asked it, it wouldn't even be weird.

Also, the flexible schedule question is quite reasonable.  There's no reason not to have flex schedules in this modern world unless your jobs requires you to directly interact with customers.
 
2013-02-19 10:51:30 AM

BarkingUnicorn: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

Sounds like you violated the ADA. ;-)  Disabled people are allowed to have helpers during job interviews.


You would think they would arrange that prior to the interview if they were going down that route.  She can't really violate the ADA if she wasn't notified of the disability.
 
2013-02-19 10:52:11 AM

nickerj1: Also, the flexible schedule question is quite reasonable.  There's no reason not to have flex schedules in this modern world unless your jobs requires you to directly interact with customers.


I expect the question wasn't "do you have flexible work hours", but rather something along the lines of "I'm not planning on coming in Mondays or Fridays. You'd better not have a problem with that".
 
2013-02-19 10:53:29 AM

WhippingBoy: nickerj1: Also, the flexible schedule question is quite reasonable.  There's no reason not to have flex schedules in this modern world unless your jobs requires you to directly interact with customers.

I expect the question wasn't "do you have flexible work hours", but rather something along the lines of "I'm not planning on coming in Mondays or Fridays. You'd better not have a problem with that".


yes, because any non-bootkicker is an lazy asshole.
 
2013-02-19 10:54:17 AM

seadoo2006: Rickenbacker: Not at all surprised someone asked about having to work every day.  It's amazing the young ones I see who come in and want to dictate what hours they will work during the interview.

So, I'll see you on Saturday and Sunday, right?  Asking what days you're working and what hours you're expected to work are not bad questions ... how else are you going to know when to come in the first day?


I make it a point to ask what a typical work day is like, quickly followed by some variation of "Work-life balance is important to me. If I go with you, will I be looking at 12-15 hour days on a regular basis?" The way a lot of companies are structuring their work schedules these days, asking what kind of schedule is expected of you is not a bad question. Any place that would take that as a sign of laziness probably isn't worth your time anyway.
 
2013-02-19 10:56:54 AM

cfreak: As an IT worker it amazes me that there are still businesses who think my job is 9 - 5 and then turns around wanting late meetings, weekend work, etc.

 
Ant
2013-02-19 10:57:00 AM

DarkSoulNoHope: "Are you a company that tells me I work weekdays only, but will you still ask me to come in for Saturday and Sunday work and late night meetings, even when you know I will have other plans?"


I don't see a problem with this. Work is not life. A person should be able to plan stuff after work and on weekends without that person's employer feeling that they own all of their employees' time.
 
2013-02-19 10:57:55 AM

Girion47: BarkingUnicorn: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

Sounds like you violated the ADA. ;-)  Disabled people are allowed to have helpers during job interviews.

You would think they would arrange that prior to the interview if they were going down that route.  She can't really violate the ADA if she wasn't notified of the disability.


She answered "no" to the legally stated ADA question and disclaimer.
 
2013-02-19 10:58:25 AM

nickerj1: It's obvious that article was written by a woman.  "Do you want to take a ride in my car?" wouldn't put me off from an interviewee as I'm a guy. It's kinda weird, but wouldn't be an instant "don't hire them".  If in the interview we got to talking about cars and he asked it, it wouldn't even be weird.


I'm trying to find a job-related reason to ask such a question.
 
2013-02-19 10:58:50 AM

GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.


You did check he wasn't there because of health issues first right? If he was there acting as a helper, you'll have given her a pretty horrible experience.

"and she had this white cane and didn't remove her sunglasses to meet me! I kicked her right out into the street and she just started sobbing quietly! Serves her right for being so rude!"
 
2013-02-19 11:00:34 AM
i2.ytimg.com

"Retainer"
 
2013-02-19 11:04:08 AM

texdent: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

That's a new level of crazy what's becoming the norm in the hiring process.


Your Post, New And Improved™.

abigsmurf: Something far worse: sent off loads of applications, got a call asking for me to come in to talk about a job. Got all nervous, prepared for the interview, suit dry cleaned etc.

Did a quick check of the business before I left so I knew what they did... It was an agency. They'd acted like it was an actual job interview just so they could get my name on their books. I was mildly vexed to say the least.


Don't let your vexation (sp?) get the best of you when interviewing with agencies: Mrs. EspiaBoricua got her current job straight from the employer last month because she worked with an agency during the hiring process.

/good luck in your job search!
 
2013-02-19 11:04:37 AM
As a former Employment / VR Counsellor, I have heard these, and others too.

Brobdiggy: I think it was smart that he at least called you.
 
2013-02-19 11:06:26 AM

BarkingUnicorn: nickerj1: It's obvious that article was written by a woman.  "Do you want to take a ride in my car?" wouldn't put me off from an interviewee as I'm a guy. It's kinda weird, but wouldn't be an instant "don't hire them".  If in the interview we got to talking about cars and he asked it, it wouldn't even be weird.

I'm trying to find a job-related reason to ask such a question.


Pizza-delivery interview?
Courier?
NASCAR team?
Time for lunch?
 
2013-02-19 11:07:44 AM
Do you ever press charges?
 
2013-02-19 11:08:17 AM

Prof. Frink: texdent: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

That's a new level of crazy.

The term now is "velcro parent"; "helicopter parent" involves more hovering protectively at a slight disance


Doesn't "velcro" imply that, with sufficient force, the two could eventually be separated?

Because the examples I've seen don't seem to indicate that they're ever going to get pulled apart.  The honeymoon night for a pair of millennials involves up to 4 parents, all heaping praise on their fragile snowflakes.
 
2013-02-19 11:08:58 AM
Skarekrough - If they fire me then so be it.  It's better to get it over now than dance around it and be stressed about it for years before it happens anyway.

Gods, where was this advice six years ago?!?

I was just fired from a non-profit because the biggest wig there is a lying, back stabbing moron. It was my own naivete and desire to be a good employee for someone who most definitely did not deserve it that kept me there. I spent 6 years working myself into a massive flair-up of my depression, my anxiety, and adding panic attacks which I had never had before. I injured myself working for him and then got turned down because there was 'no evidence of injury'. Well I guess my back would have to fall out of my body, then he might get it? No way.Then, he fires me for some made up crap because he knows that, since I was the videographer for the company, I have proof of his lunacy and his stupidity. He also knew I was getting to the point where I was about to become 'indispensable', and he would therefore run the risk of me going to the real boss, the board of directors, so better to get rid of me now.

/he has no idea I have made copies of the times where he showed his ass. If he disputes the unemployment, I guess I will be using my editing skills to create a little video of who is running that place. And my selling skills to get most of the local networks to air it.
// I am 50, I do not have an expensive piece of paper, I cannot be a wage slave for you. I have skills and talents aplenty, but they are not blue-collar, nor are they useful in a manufacturing setting. Which is where all those without expensive pieces of paper end up. I can not work in a manufacturing setting because I cannot stand for long periods. (Fifteen years of land surveying work destroyed my arches and my knees).
/// in short, I am doomed. Those hateful pain pills will run out and the doc said she would not give me any more. I have to go to some specialist (translation, someone who demands more money than the doctor did) so they can create a 'pain management plan' (translation: You will be shelling out more and more money on a regular basis now) which will address one of my problems. I cannot afford to address any of then.
//// Anyone got some Seconal, or some Darvon I can use? I am thinking 20 will do the trick, if I take them all at once...
 
2013-02-19 11:10:49 AM
Is it OK if I awkwardly  reach for my water during the interview?

wp.patheos.com.s3.amazonaws.com
 
2013-02-19 11:10:52 AM
abigsmurf:  Something far worse: sent off loads of applications, got a call asking for me to come in to talk about a job. Got all nervous, prepared for the interview, suit dry cleaned etc.

Did a quick check of the business before I left so I knew what they did... It was an agency. They'd acted like it was an actual job interview just so they could get my name on their books. I was mildly vexed to say the least.


I had the same thing happen, though I didn't find out it was a headhunter agency until I took the day off (without pay) from my temp job for the "interview." After about 30 minutes of "interview chit chat," the gal finally revealed that they were a headhunter agency and wanted to charge me $4,000 for them to find me a job. "Most young people just put it on their credit card," she said.
 
2013-02-19 11:12:04 AM

xalres: I've sworn off dealing with recruiters with a face to face requirement because more often than not it's a massive waste of time. You waste the time and gas to get to their offices, waste $8 - $15 to park in the parking structure because they don't validate, only to have a 5 minute conversation with the head recruiter about your career goals before they sit you in a room and have different guys come in and pitch jobs at you that either don't meet your requirements (salary, location, contract instead of full-perm) or you're unqualified for (I'm looking for a .NET position, what makes you think I can also program in Java? Is it in my resume?).


You forgot the part where you have to sit in the lobby transcribing information off your resume onto a poorly designed paper form for a half hour before the receptionist will even tell the recruiter that you're there.

Never again.
 
2013-02-19 11:13:17 AM
Some of those questions are just stupid, and should never be asked.  Some of them should be rephrased, like the "do I have to be at work everyday?" could be a reference to flexible schedules, or in IT could be a "do you plan on trying to make me work every waking minute, 365 days a year like my last employer tried to do?"

But some of them are completely valid, if you're planning on conditioning accepting the job on the answer.  The midday nap would be an obvious one, if it's something the company offers the interviewer will likely be proud of it, and happy to discuss the policy.  It might even help get you the job, since your question suggests that you'd be a good fit for that kind of company culture.  If you're not planning on accepting a job that doesn't offer it, there's no reason to make the interviewer at a company with a nap prohibition happy.

I'm not sure the "do you have a job for my partner?" isn't appropriate for the interview, if you're definitely going to turn down an offer without it.  It's going to be a less commonly appropriate question in the business world, but in academia they actually refer to it as the "two-body problem" - and it's common to accommodate a significant other, since it's more likely than not that they are both professors, and it's unlikely in most cities that there would be another educational institution for the second person to be employed by, and there may be no other employment possibilities in the area.  Since the chance is high that any offer for only one person would be refused anyway, it might as well be asked in an interview.
 
2013-02-19 11:15:11 AM

over_and_done: The honeymoon night for a pair of millennials involves up to 4 parents, all heaping praise on their fragile snowflakes.


Given the prevalence of divorce and remarriage, the honeymoon could likely involve more than 4 parents.
 
2013-02-19 11:18:23 AM

poot_rootbeer: xalres: I've sworn off dealing with recruiters with a face to face requirement because more often than not it's a massive waste of time. You waste the time and gas to get to their offices, waste $8 - $15 to park in the parking structure because they don't validate, only to have a 5 minute conversation with the head recruiter about your career goals before they sit you in a room and have different guys come in and pitch jobs at you that either don't meet your requirements (salary, location, contract instead of full-perm) or you're unqualified for (I'm looking for a .NET position, what makes you think I can also program in Java? Is it in my resume?).

You forgot the part where you have to sit in the lobby transcribing information off your resume onto a poorly designed paper form for a half hour before the receptionist will even tell the recruiter that you're there.

Never again.


RRRRRRAAAAAAAAAAGE!!!!!

Ahem...yeah I totally forgot about that part. They have a printer and an electronic copy of my resume don't they? What's the point of doing that?

Not really looking forward to starting that whole process again but...ehhhh just eff this place.
 
2013-02-19 11:20:42 AM

GalFriday: WhippingBoy: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

Sounds like the poor girl had a debilitating mental illness and was trying her best.
At least you get to feel superior to her, and show the internet how cool you are.

Bring it on ITG!

What I had was a highly educated and well-trained serologist in front of me.  There was nothing mentally wrong with her other than her crippling immaturity.


A scientist lacking people skills?  UNPOSSIBLE!

Chances are, you either gave up an incredible asset to your team, or dodged a massive bullet.  I doubt there's much middle ground there.
 
2013-02-19 11:21:18 AM

xalres: You forgot the part where you have to sit in the lobby transcribing information off your resume onto a poorly designed paper form for a half hour before the receptionist will even tell the recruiter that you're there.



In your letter, put a footnote that says that if they have forms they wish you to fill out before an interview would they please email them to you.
 
2013-02-19 11:27:32 AM
This is a tough one because I know that instant feedback is always appreciated, but asking this question during an interview is really taboo.

Maybe the question is taboo, but godammit, interviewers should really give the interviewee at least a hint on how well it went, and not that subtle of one. I know there are some standard hints, but in a better world, the interviewee would pretty well know what the opinion upon leaving.
 
2013-02-19 11:28:19 AM
What I'm trying to point out is that for the vast majority of positions open, hours are discussed, if not even placed prominently in the advert (online or print).   And, the average person doesn't get to negotiate hours.  Good for you if you did.  The biggest reason, IMHO, that we have such a problem filling so many skilled positions is of lack of work ethic.
 
2013-02-19 11:28:57 AM
We were interviewing a man from China regarding a software job here in the US.  He was not living in the area, so traveled to our city for the interview.  DURING the interview, he asked one of the interviewers that if he was offered the job, whether he could live with that person while he found a place to live.  Always a little awkward.
 
2013-02-19 11:30:19 AM

DarkVader: GalFriday: WhippingBoy: GalFriday: I just interviewed an idiot this morning that brought her dad with her to sit in on the interview.  I wouldn't let him and she almost cried.  She graduated college in 1998 so she is at least 30 years old. Then during the interview, she only gave one word answers and didn't ask any questions.

I am not hiring her.

Sounds like the poor girl had a debilitating mental illness and was trying her best.
At least you get to feel superior to her, and show the internet how cool you are.

Bring it on ITG!

What I had was a highly educated and well-trained serologist in front of me.  There was nothing mentally wrong with her other than her crippling immaturity.

A scientist lacking people skills?  UNPOSSIBLE!

Chances are, you either gave up an incredible asset to your team, or dodged a massive bullet.  I doubt there's much middle ground there.


I have NEVER hired a scientist for their people skills, I expect them to have little to no social skills.  These people very rarely interact with each other, let alone the rest of the office and NEVER the clients.  But, if she is going to cry when she has to interview without her dad there, what is she doing to do if she has to give testimony in open court, or even closed court where her father most certainly would not be allowed?

I think I dodged a bullet.
 
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