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(Gawker)   Ivy-league physics professor starts class by stripping while showing footage of Hitler and 9/11. Then it gets weird (with video)   (gawker.com) divider line 130
    More: Strange, physics, Hitler, Ivy League, quantum physics, footage, professors  
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17850 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Feb 2013 at 1:27 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-19 02:41:10 AM  
I'm pretty sure that was the weirdest part subby. Unless he sacrificed a goat and the audience started fapping it can't get much weirder.
 
2013-02-19 02:41:35 AM  
I'm just surprised he didn't suddenly say "Number 6 please, David".
 
2013-02-19 02:42:02 AM  
Oddly enough, this is not dissimilar to my Quantum Physics professor's last lecture. He got naked, started yelling at walls, then ran into every other occupied lecture theatre before being lead away.

/not an Ivy League school
//still CSB
 
2013-02-19 02:42:35 AM  

Triumph: poot_rootbeer: Triumph: What are the odds that guy has a dungeon?

A dungeon?  In Manhattan?  On a Columbia faculty salary?

First, who says he lives in Manhattan? Second, Columbia ranks second in average salary just barely behind Harvard. LINK
If he's tenured, he's prolly pulling down over 200k, much more if he wrote a textbook.


Don't get misled by those salary figures. The only ones that are pulling in over $200K are at the Business School and Law School, with maybe a few at the Med School. Profs in the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences will be tenured for 20 years before they hit $160K or so. Besides, he probably does live in faculty housing in Manhattan (heavily subsidized).

This class is a bit of a clusterfark - I know, having taught its seminar sections for a couple of semesters. All freshmen in Columbia College are required to take this some time in their first year. 500 kids at a time pile into this lecture once a week, and then attend a seminar section (led by one of a bevy of instructors) with about 20-25 students later in the week. In principle, the class is meant to introduce everyone to the cutting edge of science in an effort to teach them about how science is done. In practice, they kids who are really keen on science tend to be bored, and the ones who came to Columbia for the liberal arts tend to wail and gnash their teeth.

/css
 
2013-02-19 02:49:00 AM  

nmrsnr: No, QM says that if you run at the wall enough times you will appear on the other side of the wall because you really were there all along and that makes no sense, and is completely incapable of being explained classically.


Stuff like this is why I love quantum mechanics and fark, even though I usually feel like I don't understand either.
 
2013-02-19 02:54:18 AM  
Even Ivy Leaguers record videos in portrait mode?

We're doomed.
 
2013-02-19 02:54:28 AM  
I think you guys are thinking a little too deeply here.

img690.imageshack.us
 
2013-02-19 03:00:33 AM  
Meh. Amateur.

i.imgur.com
 
2013-02-19 03:18:23 AM  

GAT_00: Philbb: nmrsnr: The only way that makes sense as an introduction to QM is if he had immediately afterwards said "Confused? Vaguely frightened? Welcome to the standard state of mind one feels when studying Quantum Mechanics." Otherwise, WTF?

That's pretty much what I got from it. "Nothing you've seen or heard so far makes any sense at all in the world that you have always known. Quantum Mechanics is like that."

If QM makes sense to you, then something is wrong with you.

According to QM, there is a non-zero chance that you can run full speed into a door and go straight through it as if it didn't exist.  It is unlikely, but given enough attempts you should be able to accomplish it.



"None of this is true!   Say goodbye to classical reality, because our logic collapses on the subatomic level into ghosts and shadows."

A great professor.  But don't agree to any extra-credit projects.
 
2013-02-19 03:21:52 AM  

LargeCanine: Folks like that should be paid what they are worth... part time at Starbucks.


How do you know what he's worth? He could be the most brilliant professor there.
 
2013-02-19 03:24:19 AM  
I lol'd pretty good from this one.
 
2013-02-19 03:51:38 AM  
From footballer to university physics lecturer. That's quite an impressive career range he has, and I for one will forgive him a few mild eccentricities.
 
2013-02-19 03:54:57 AM  
i.imgur.com
 
2013-02-19 04:15:57 AM  
 
2013-02-19 04:36:01 AM  

SomethingToDo: What the future holds for our hero


Subspaces of n-dimensional Riemannian manifolds, you say?  I think I read that paper.
 
2013-02-19 04:37:37 AM  
Man, and my students thought I was a less than usually boring lecturer just because I tend to curse like a sailor every time I stop paying attention to something I've prepared in advance.

This guy really goes all out.

nmrsnr: No, QM says that if you run at the wall enough times you will appear on the other side of the wall because you really were there all along and that makes no sense, and is completely incapable of being explained classically.


Actually, QM pretty much says this doesn't happen, as on macro scales the math collapses into Newtonian mechanics.

There's really nothing that odd about it, things pretty much always behave somewhat differently in different length and time regimes than in ours.  Even in classical mechanics initial approximations such as, say, newton's theory of projectile impact depth will be turned weird if you do something smartass like fire your projectile in an incompressible fluid, and the theory of gravitational acceleration goes right to shiat if you test it in a fluid of sufficient density and viscosity for resistance to be a major factor.  everything's an approximation for its regime, ain't no total rules for all situations unless you want to burn up a lot of goddamned chalk on that chalk-board.

//Fluid dynamics was the original "goddammit, none of this makes any sense" example of science being weird for the layman.  That doesn't actually mean it doesn't make any sense if you're used to it.  For bonus points, the Bessel functions you see all the time in the basic description of the H atom in intro QM?  Original developed to solve a fluids problem.

//Not that QM, or fluid dynamics for that matter, isn't cool as all hell.  Its reputation for being a mind-fark is kinda undeserved grandstanding by science students that want to feel special rather than something truly beyond the grasp of mere mortals, though.  I mean, the math can be a pain to the average english major, but a bit of pounding and you can get the core concepts in there as easy as any other specialized academic subject.
 
2013-02-19 04:40:25 AM  

Pointy Tail of Satan: We all know the Schrodinger cat experiment. But what would happen if one put a dead cat in the box?


Given a couple days in summer, a very smelly box
 
2013-02-19 04:53:58 AM  

Yuri Futanari: [i.imgur.com image 319x404]


For it to work, it must be done n times. You only did it once.
 
2013-02-19 05:14:50 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: FatalDischarge: AverageAmericanGuy: It's weird, but it's no Yoko Ono.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S_ScyKztGA0

I was just thinking that this was footage was from her birthday party.

AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAaaaaAAAAAAAAA AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAaaa aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa


I...what?

Is this the aural version of LSD?  I can actually feel my brain melting.
 
2013-02-19 05:21:51 AM  

daniellynn's real dad: Oddly enough, this is not dissimilar to my Quantum Physics professor's last lecture. He got naked, started yelling at walls, then ran into every other occupied lecture theatre before being lead away.

/not an Ivy League school
//still CSB


Look - if I spent any appreciable amount of my life attempting to explain this incomprehensible nonsense to bored teenagers who were thinking about their genitals the entire time, I'd go nuts too.
 
2013-02-19 05:26:21 AM  
I get his point, I just think he should have consulted with someone from an arts department to execute it better. Why 9/11 and Hitler? You could have gotten more confusion and less offense out of plenty of other things. Surrealism is not a new concept, and "WTF is going on" is a reaction film and music composition majors are quite good at getting.
 
2013-02-19 05:27:05 AM  
also,

briefly showing he is in decent shape and knows farking QM, he will bang no less than 4 of those freshman biatches with that strip stunt.
 
2013-02-19 05:30:58 AM  
Lady professor?

*click*

/DNWTV.
 
2013-02-19 05:36:50 AM  
Hi Sadam ?

Im not from the US but I think that getting a degree might be be easy bases on the sound track, the "person" sounds like a demented 12 year old school girl if she taking this subject Im kind of sure Im able to do well

I also hear some of the other schools going easy on exams let you do them from home

Good luck, trying to keep up with China
 
2013-02-19 05:37:18 AM  
If we are going to have someone strip while attempting to teach science, why can't it be someone like
Monica Dunford
atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch
or
Janna Levin
www.smh.com.au
or
Claudia Alexander
www.engin.umich.edu

/I might even settle for Michelle Thaller
melitatrips.com


// I wonder if I could pitch this to one of the 'documentary' channels. Rather than showing some pawn shop buying panned gold from a large truck driven by Honey BoBo and Yogi, they could have 'Naked Science' - Where the presenters are all attractive scientists, and all nude. Think 'Naked News' - but with science!
// Just say no to Kaku
/// Now think of Dr Hawking?
 
2013-02-19 05:40:26 AM  

jso2897: Look - if I spent any appreciable amount of my life attempting to explain this incomprehensible nonsense to bored teenagers who were when I was thinking about their genitals the entire time, I'd go nuts too.


FTFY


/or FTFM, at least
 
2013-02-19 05:51:21 AM  

Relatively Obscure: [i3.ytimg.com image 320x180]


LEARN WITH ME!
 
2013-02-19 06:06:16 AM  

johnnygew: If we are going to have someone strip while attempting to teach science, why can't it be someone like
Monica Dunford
[atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch image 515x362]
or
Janna Levin
[www.smh.com.au image 220x254]
or
Claudia Alexander
[www.engin.umich.edu image 640x300]

/I might even settle for Michelle Thaller
[melitatrips.com image 268x203]


// I wonder if I could pitch this to one of the 'documentary' channels. Rather than showing some pawn shop buying panned gold from a large truck driven by Honey BoBo and Yogi, they could have 'Naked Science' - Where the presenters are all attractive scientists, and all nude. Think 'Naked News' - but with science!
// Just say no to Kaku
/// Now think of Dr Hawking?


We can do better:

Elisabeth Rieper
static5.businessinsider.com

Lisa Randall
i115.photobucket.com

Deborah Berebichez
img844.imageshack.us

Kim-Vy Tran
i115.photobucket.com

Amy Mainzer
i115.photobucket.com

Sarah Kavassalis
i115.photobucket.com

/objectification is fun
 
2013-02-19 06:21:00 AM  
gerbilpox:Amy Mainzer

i115.photobucket.com

I'd love to conduct a short but in-depth study of kinetic motion with her culminating in a demonstration of the principles of ballistics on her stomach.
 
2013-02-19 06:35:22 AM  

Jim_Callahan: Man, and my students thought I was a less than usually boring lecturer just because I tend to curse like a sailor every time I stop paying attention to something I've prepared in advance.

This guy really goes all out.

nmrsnr: No, QM says that if you run at the wall enough times you will appear on the other side of the wall because you really were there all along and that makes no sense, and is completely incapable of being explained classically.

Actually, QM pretty much says this doesn't happen, as on macro scales the math collapses into Newtonian mechanics.

There's really nothing that odd about it, things pretty much always behave somewhat differently in different length and time regimes than in ours.  Even in classical mechanics initial approximations such as, say, newton's theory of projectile impact depth will be turned weird if you do something smartass like fire your projectile in an incompressible fluid, and the theory of gravitational acceleration goes right to shiat if you test it in a fluid of sufficient density and viscosity for resistance to be a major factor.  everything's an approximation for its regime, ain't no total rules for all situations unless you want to burn up a lot of goddamned chalk on that chalk-board.

//Fluid dynamics was the original "goddammit, none of this makes any sense" example of science being weird for the layman.  That doesn't actually mean it doesn't make any sense if you're used to it.  For bonus points, the Bessel functions you see all the time in the basic description of the H atom in intro QM?  Original developed to solve a fluids problem.

//Not that QM, or fluid dynamics for that matter, isn't cool as all hell.  Its reputation for being a mind-fark is kinda undeserved grandstanding by science students that want to feel special rather than something truly beyond the grasp of mere mortals, though.  I mean, the math can be a pain to the average english major, but a bit of pounding and you can get the core concepts in the ...


Good post, but I'd make one refinement:  "the earth is round" was the "original none of this makes sense" for the average layman.

THAT'S the original mindscrew...hell, some fundies STILL have trouble with it.

19% of my fellow Americans, for starters...
 
2013-02-19 07:02:46 AM  
HOLD THE CAMERA THE OTHER WAY!!!!111!!ELEVENTY!11!
 
2013-02-19 07:06:30 AM  
My bachelors thesis was on an experiment he was also a member of, and we have a paper together http://prl.aps.org/abstract/PRL/v95/i8/e081601.

He's always been a little bit weird (not that I'm any less weird, I guess it comes with the territory). Also, his wife was, at one point, one of his students, and he at least always used to have a gaggle of female students hanging around (which, considering at the time he was a professor at Caltech, probably meant all the female students on campus).

/CSB
 
2013-02-19 07:33:15 AM  

Jim_Callahan: Actually, QM pretty much says this doesn't happen, as on macro scales the math collapses into Newtonian mechanics.


This.

I was studying nuclear engineering for two years before some shennanigans I was involved in got me concerned abotu a job with a securtiy clearance, so I switched to mechanical engineering.  I took some very in depth (for undergraduate) QM classes.  I think our teacher made it easier by not playing up how "crazy" it was, but by explaining that on a small enough scale how we think the world works is incorrect.
 
2013-02-19 07:35:32 AM  
I read this entire thread in Sheldon Coopers voice.
 
2013-02-19 07:47:39 AM  

liam76: I took some very in depth (for undergraduate) QM classes. I think our teacher made it easier by not playing up how "crazy" it was, but by explaining that on a small enough scale how we think the world works is incorrect.


*nod*  That's basically part of my 8th grade science lesson on what theories really are. I don't get into details, of course, but I do a 5 minute history jog from Greek/Roman mythology to Quantum Mechanics, pointing out how each subsequent model progressively explain extreme data better than previous models do, but tend to be far more complicated, too. Newtonian being a good balance between usefulness and simplicity for most everyday applications. Blah blah, etc.
 
2013-02-19 07:49:59 AM  

PunGent: Good post, but I'd make one refinement: "the earth is round" was the "original none of this makes sense" for the average layman.


Actually we've known the earth is round for over 2000 years. The whole thing with Columbus *WASN'T* that they thought the earth was flat. That's a popular myth-they'd known since the greeks it was round. Hell, the greeks calculated the circumfurence using shadows and were only a couple hundred miles off, if I remember right!

No, the thing with Columbus was he felt the greeks were wrong, and the circumfurence was MUCH smaller, so he could totally sail around the world. People wouldn't fund him not because they were convinced he'd fall off the face of the earth, but because they were pretty sure he was just going to die out in the ocean. And if America hadn't been in the way, he kind of would have.
 
2013-02-19 08:17:11 AM  

GAT_00: According to QM, there is a non-zero chance that you can run full speed into a door and go straight through it as if it didn't exist.


well, not quite. you run into the door and go straight through---but not as though it didn't exist. its existence matters...
 
2013-02-19 08:17:13 AM  

GAT_00: Philbb: nmrsnr: The only way that makes sense as an introduction to QM is if he had immediately afterwards said "Confused? Vaguely frightened? Welcome to the standard state of mind one feels when studying Quantum Mechanics." Otherwise, WTF?

That's pretty much what I got from it. "Nothing you've seen or heard so far makes any sense at all in the world that you have always known. Quantum Mechanics is like that."

If QM makes sense to you, then something is wrong with you.

According to QM, there is a non-zero chance that you can run full speed into a door and go straight through it as if it didn't exist.  It is unlikely, but given enough attempts you should be able to accomplish it.


So maybe The Flash only manipulates the localized quantum probability around himself on a macro level to mean he has a certain velocity and can pass through doors whilst remaining in the shape of The Flash n stuff. All the running poses are just for show. Would explain how he can run up a spotlight beam...
 
2013-02-19 08:18:41 AM  

proteus_b: GAT_00: According to QM, there is a non-zero chance that you can run full speed into a door and go straight through it as if it didn't exist.

well, not quite. you run into the door and go straight through---but not as though it didn't exist. its existence matters...


No, he is right. There is a small chance you would go through it as though it didn`t exist. As if its existence didn`t matter.
 
2013-02-19 08:21:51 AM  

dready zim: proteus_b: GAT_00: According to QM, there is a non-zero chance that you can run full speed into a door and go straight through it as if it didn't exist.

well, not quite. you run into the door and go straight through---but not as though it didn't exist. its existence matters...

No, he is right. There is a small chance you would go through it as though it didn`t exist. As if its existence didn`t matter.


Of course, there is a much larger chance that you pass through the door and interact with it in some way, most of them end up with you dead.
 
2013-02-19 08:26:18 AM  

dready zim: dready zim: proteus_b: GAT_00: According to QM, there is a non-zero chance that you can run full speed into a door and go straight through it as if it didn't exist.

well, not quite. you run into the door and go straight through---but not as though it didn't exist. its existence matters...

No, he is right. There is a small chance you would go through it as though it didn`t exist. As if its existence didn`t matter.

Of course, there is a much larger chance that you pass through the door and interact with it in some way, most of them end up with you dead.


Technically, there is even a chance that the door actually stops existing for long enough for you to pass through then reappears when you are past but that is really really unlikely.
 
2013-02-19 08:28:18 AM  

Jim_Callahan: There's really nothing that odd about it, things pretty much always behave somewhat differently in different length and time regimes than in ours.


I'm not going to argue with you too much, since you're basically right, I would, however, say that there is a fundamental difference between emergent mindfarks like fluid dynamics and fundamental mindfarks like QM. While there are plenty of regimes that are counter-intuitive to everyday experience, on a fundamental level they still treat objects classically, i.e. little ballistic objects hitting each other, conservation of mass and energy are strictly enforced, and if you really, really wanted to, you could come up with the same bizarre outcome from first principles (in theory, since computationally it'd take damn near forever).

QM on the other hand is different, it's bizarre and counter-intuitive, and it also says that "nothing I do can be explained classically" objects aren't well behaved ballistic objects hitting each other, they are everywhere at once until they decide they are actually somewhere (forgive the anthropomorphism, they don't decide anything, but I don't want to go into a discussion of what or how observation works). Mass-energy is only conserved in the long run, and no matter how much you try, there is no way you can describe QM using classical principles. So while I would say that yes, there are plenty of regimes in physics that are alien to ours, I would still argue that QM is fundamentally different, and therefor more astoundingly confusing.
 
2013-02-19 08:30:56 AM  
I have no idea if his performance effectively metaphorized the complexities of quantum mechanics, but he looked totally hawt when he took his shirt off.
 
2013-02-19 08:38:06 AM  
So just what are the drop/add statistics for that particular section?

/Curious minds want to know...
 
2013-02-19 08:45:07 AM  

Daffydil: well I know Hitler makes me want to get naked...schlick, schilck, schlick...


Well, Hitler made a lot of people take their clothes. Then they went to the showers. And after that was when things got truly hot.
 
2013-02-19 08:49:28 AM  

Canton: So just what are the drop/add statistics for that particular section?

/Curious minds want to know...


It's a required course. One lecture section only. Only way a student can drop in one semester is if they take it again the next semester.
 
2013-02-19 08:54:08 AM  

dready zim: No, he is right. There is a small chance you would go through it as though it didn`t exist. As if its existence didn`t matter.


sorry, it's not true. the probability of being on the other side of the door definitely depends on its existence. if you put a beam of particles incident on such a door, the current you'd see on the other side will depend on the potential's width... and will certainly be different than if there were no potential there. for better or worse, i have studied it out, on the subject of quantum shiat...
 
2013-02-19 08:54:45 AM  

gerbilpox: johnnygew: If we are going to have someone strip while attempting to teach science, why can't it be someone like
Monica Dunford
[atlas-service-enews.web.cern.ch image 515x362]
or
Janna Levin
[www.smh.com.au image 220x254]
or
Claudia Alexander
[www.engin.umich.edu image 640x300]

/I might even settle for Michelle Thaller
[melitatrips.com image 268x203]


// I wonder if I could pitch this to one of the 'documentary' channels. Rather than showing some pawn shop buying panned gold from a large truck driven by Honey BoBo and Yogi, they could have 'Naked Science' - Where the presenters are all attractive scientists, and all nude. Think 'Naked News' - but with science!
// Just say no to Kaku
/// Now think of Dr Hawking?

We can do better:

Elisabeth Rieper
[static5.businessinsider.com image 400x300]

Lisa Randall
[i115.photobucket.com image 319x480]

Deborah Berebichez
[img844.imageshack.us image 394x524]

Kim-Vy Tran
[i115.photobucket.com image 393x482]

Amy Mainzer
[i115.photobucket.com image 438x382]

Sarah Kavassalis
[i115.photobucket.com image 301x388]

/objectification is fun



I would gladly watch the video if it featured one of them stripping.

In fact, I dare say I would fap to it.
 
2013-02-19 08:59:26 AM  
Meh, he's just proving that he's not the inventor of the first time machine. I do that every regretful weekend.
 
2013-02-19 09:01:52 AM  
 
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