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(Seattle Times)   Boeing tries to win back dissatisfied 787 customers with quick fix for fiery battery problem. Fix includes heavy-duty titanium or steel containment box around battery cells, high-pressure evacuation tubes, and complete set of used rosary beads   (seattletimes.com) divider line 8
    More: Followup, Boeing, lithium-ion battery, cell phones, steel containment, containment box, containment, variable cost, retrofits  
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1538 clicks; posted to Business » on 18 Feb 2013 at 2:01 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-18 04:46:43 PM
2 votes:

spawn73: I don't understand the temporary solution. Yeah, put it in a box so a potential fire doesn't spread to the rest of the plane, seems prudent.

But does the now contained battery still work when it's in that state of overheating/fire?

Why can't they temporarely replace the batteries with nicad ones untill they figure out what the problem is with these ones, no room?


They could always bolt on a backup steam engine that could draw its power from the battery fire.
2013-02-18 02:48:24 PM
2 votes:
What about the 788th customer?  Where's the satisfaction??
2013-02-18 02:13:21 PM
2 votes:

derpy: Boeing is getting to be the new Chrysler


Not sure you can compare a 787 to a K-Car, after all the K-Car worked.
2013-02-18 09:38:07 PM
1 votes:

Ivo Shandor: theurge14: Batteries?  Isn't there wind power available up there?

Wind power is available.


They'd still be missing out on a huge potential power source. They could install seats with built-in bicycle pedal generators. With so many passengers just sitting around with nothing else to do, they'll have the plane back up and running in no time at all.
2013-02-18 07:21:47 PM
1 votes:
Glad to hear they're using titanium but magnesium is even lighter.
2013-02-18 06:23:56 PM
1 votes:
Surpheon: Boeing will get over it, and the 787 places them firmly ahead of the competition for a decade. Unless their design work is stolen (entirely possible), this is some awfully valuable education.

I don't see how anyone can steal the plans, it's not like it has been broken out to dozens of businesses in a bunch of different countries.

/Looking forward to flying the new Air China 878.
2013-02-18 05:54:35 PM
1 votes:

Ivo Shandor: Doktor_Zhivago: Lithium ion (or just plain lithium) batteries usually only catch fire if you really fark something up*, like not protecting against over voltage/current or wiring them in parallel instead of series, or somehow shorting the contacts (a battery with no load is a very bad thing**). So the issue is not the batteries.

I guess you missed this section of the article:

Forensic work by the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) determined that the battery fire in early January on an empty 787 parked at Logan International Airport in Boston started with a short circuit inside one of the battery's eight cells.

Battery experts caution that while the most likely culprit is a tiny metal shard contaminating the cell during the manufacturing process, the root cause may never be definitively proved because of destruction from the thermal runaway.


Damnit! I can't be expected to read the article.  /shame
2013-02-18 05:08:52 PM
1 votes:
Why do I imagine a giant square piece of plastic on the bottom of the plane with a little pinch handle that's covering a pair of giant AA batteries?
 
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