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(Seattle Times)   Boeing tries to win back dissatisfied 787 customers with quick fix for fiery battery problem. Fix includes heavy-duty titanium or steel containment box around battery cells, high-pressure evacuation tubes, and complete set of used rosary beads   (seattletimes.com) divider line 8
    More: Followup, Boeing, lithium-ion battery, cell phones, steel containment, containment box, containment, variable cost, retrofits  
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1547 clicks; posted to Business » on 18 Feb 2013 at 2:01 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-18 03:12:32 PM
2 votes:

ha-ha-guy: All that said, I'm still amazed how Boeing never bothered to ask around and discover all the problems


Boeing outsourced a bunch of the design and it bit them in the ass. The suits who had a boner for breaking the engineer's union seemed to think that just because the batteries were good for their satellite use they'd be OK on planes. (Sats have a one-time traumatic launch vibration and shock, planes vibrated thousands of hours every year.)

Boeing will get over it, and the 787 places them firmly ahead of the competition for a decade. Unless their design work is stolen (entirely possible), this is some awfully valuable education.
2013-02-18 03:07:44 PM
2 votes:

ha-ha-guy: I feel bad for Boeing.  The auto industry learned long ago that a battery supplier is lying whenever his mouth his moving.  They all promise you the world and then end up supplying batteries that explode and shower your entire team with nasty chemicals.  It's still a very young and immature industry.  All that said, I'm still amazed how Boeing never bothered to ask around and discover all the problems.  The battery industry just doesn't seem ready to meet the tolerances of jets yet.

/In 2010 through 2011 it seemed like every week we were suing a different supplier over defective batteries and a different supplier was going bankrupt after losing a lawsuit


This is what happen when you outsource to the lowest bidder. Boeing is getting what they deserve with this entire project.
2013-02-18 09:40:16 PM
1 votes:

Pumpernickel bread: Boeing is apparently willing to risk the lives of passengers in order to make a few extra bucks. They have sacrificed their soul at the altar of the almighty dollar..


I don't know about the 787 specifically, but the battery is typically not the primary source of power. Like the alternator in your car, planes have onboard generators that produce the energy that is necessary.
2013-02-18 04:53:19 PM
1 votes:

theurge14: Batteries?  Isn't there wind power available up there?


Wind power is available.
2013-02-18 04:46:43 PM
1 votes:

spawn73: I don't understand the temporary solution. Yeah, put it in a box so a potential fire doesn't spread to the rest of the plane, seems prudent.

But does the now contained battery still work when it's in that state of overheating/fire?

Why can't they temporarely replace the batteries with nicad ones untill they figure out what the problem is with these ones, no room?


They could always bolt on a backup steam engine that could draw its power from the battery fire.
2013-02-18 03:45:43 PM
1 votes:

Lunchlady: This is what happen when you outsource to the lowest bidder. Boeing is getting what they deserve with this entire project.


The end user/consumers give their money to the lowest bidder regardless of standards and quality. It was inevitable that the problem would move up the chain.
2013-02-18 03:30:18 PM
1 votes:
At least this problem is manageable. Maybe not easy to fix, but something that can be handled. It beats the hell out of being in a Scarebus when it breaks up at FL320. Nice. Great planes.


/Took this long?
2013-02-18 03:19:35 PM
1 votes:

Surpheon: ha-ha-guy: All that said, I'm still amazed how Boeing never bothered to ask around and discover all the problems

Boeing outsourced a bunch of the design and it bit them in the ass. The suits who had a boner for breaking the engineer's union seemed to think that just because the batteries were good for their satellite use they'd be OK on planes. (Sats have a one-time traumatic launch vibration and shock, planes vibrated thousands of hours every year.)

Boeing will get over it, and the 787 places them firmly ahead of the competition for a decade. Unless their design work is stolen (entirely possible), this is some awfully valuable education.


The deal is, I'm not confident anyone out there can deliver a quick fix for the batteries on the 787.  Maybe LG Chem can pull a miracle out of their ass (they're the bestof the bunch), but I've yet to encounter any battery supplier I'm really truly happy with and trust.  It's more if I waterboard their resident engineers enough I can get the truth and demand some fixes, but they're a surly and untrustworthy bunch.  With a lot of farkups you can just call up the leading supplier in the field and make accounting buy you the parts you need to fix it.  Here I'm not sure if anyone has the parts in their catalog.  We ran two suppliers into bankruptcy just trying to design prototype batteries for the Volt.
 
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