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(io9)   Artist's vision of Voyager I outliving the death of our sun   (io9.com) divider line 14
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10527 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Feb 2013 at 2:38 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-18 04:58:41 PM  
3 votes:

kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?


Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.
2013-02-18 03:20:26 PM  
2 votes:
Has a front-row seat:

mutantreviewers.files.wordpress.com
2013-02-18 10:16:51 PM  
1 votes:

fusillade762: brandent: ShadowLAnCeR: Lord Farkwad: DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]

[s12.postimage.org image 600x450]

What episode is that from?

That's the one where he gets taken over by the probe from the "library" and he lives an entire life on the other planet in one episode.  He is a scientist, marries, has children, grows old, only to have the sun take out their civilization.  Then he comes back from the probe.  Which is really super cool since that's what he always thinks about doing with his life and the only regrets he has and he gets to live them anyway.

The fact that you had to explain the ep makes me vaguely sad. I thought that one was supposed to be a fan favorite?


The Inner Light was my favourite Star Trek episode of all time.

I thought the movie Generations really dropped the ball. When Picard was in the Nexus the family he had should have been the family he raised on The Inner Light.
2013-02-18 08:42:19 PM  
1 votes:
Ugh, has anyone ever been able to stream HD from Vimeo?  I've never been able to with either connection at my last company, Cox Cable, Comcast Cable, Clear WiMax, or Verizon LTE.  This is actually one of the fastest loading HD clips I've seen on Vimeo but it still took 5:10 to move the data for a 4:00 video.

I don't understand why anyone hosts their HD content on Vimeo.
2013-02-18 08:33:41 PM  
1 votes:

chewielouie: Voyager > DS9


If you're a moron.
2013-02-18 07:57:30 PM  
1 votes:

Ishkur: KiwDaWabbit: Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying.

Actually, we only have about a billion years. The sun will get larger and hotter, and at that point it will be too hot to support life on Earth, and the oceans and atmosphere will evaporate.

That's plenty of time to develop FTL travel. Or move to Mars.

In a billion years, "humanity" won't exist.


Even if there isn't a catastrophic event wiping out our species, the critters populating the solar system in a billion years time, some of which species might even be descended from us, will be so different from us that they couldn't rightly be called humans. Stop and think about how long a billion years is in evolutionary time. Think about how different we are from our ancestors that existed a billion years ago.

2013-02-18 06:33:31 PM  
1 votes:

LrdPhoenix: dennysgod: Let see, NASA predicts at it's current speed of 17km/s it would reach the distance of Proxima Centauri (4.25 ly) in roughly 80,000yrs. Giving that the Sun is expected to blow up in roughly 5 billion years that means that Voyager 1 (baring it being shot up by Klingons) will be apporx 14,700 ly from Earth when the Sun goes so sadly it will barely be visible to Voyager 1 if at all.

On a side now, people talking about how we have plenty of time as a civilization before the Sun consumes the Earth in 5 billion years, but actually our time is much shorter since as the Sun slowly swells the Earth will be uninhabitable in about 1 billion years.

Your math is way off.

In 5 billion years Voyager 1 will be roughly 250,000 light years away from Earth, well outside the Galaxy.  Assuming it continues at constant velocity all that time.  At 4.25 ly per 80000yr, that's 1ly per ~18823 years.  5,000,000,000 / 18,823 = ~265,632.


While the Voyagers have escape velocity from our Sun, they are not moving fast enough to leave our galaxy.  After departing our solar system it will continue in an orbit of the galactic center.

You're otherwise correct that after 5 billion years of flight, if it hasn't been drawn into a gravity well it passes, the Sun will be a vastly distant point of light, unlike in the video.
2013-02-18 05:49:17 PM  
1 votes:
Then there's the whole thing that in 5 billion years, we (and Voyager) will have revolved around the galaxy some 25 times, with all of those various interactions, stellar movements and the like.
2013-02-18 05:12:37 PM  
1 votes:

ShadowLAnCeR: Lord Farkwad: DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]

[s12.postimage.org image 600x450]

What episode is that from?




http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/The_Inner_Light_%28episode%29
2013-02-18 05:08:29 PM  
1 votes:
graphics8.nytimes.com
2013-02-18 05:02:38 PM  
1 votes:

Mad_Radhu: Eventually, we'll succumb to the heat death of the universe unless we figure out a way to travel to other universes or create new ones.


Heat death isn't something even a civilization should be worried about.  That's on the scale of trillions of years.

However, it would be sad if we got as far as becoming aware of our place in the universe, only to decline and perish with the rest of life on this planet because we simply didn't make good use of the ample time we had.
2013-02-18 04:00:26 PM  
1 votes:
I gotta admit I was a little moved by this...
2013-02-18 03:36:00 PM  
1 votes:

kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?


It isn't.
2013-02-18 02:58:56 PM  
1 votes:
That's VGER to you, carbon-based life form.
 
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