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(io9)   Artist's vision of Voyager I outliving the death of our sun   (io9.com) divider line 111
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10524 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Feb 2013 at 2:38 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-18 02:43:49 PM
Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.
 
2013-02-18 02:48:05 PM
Holy existential crisis, Batman!
 
2013-02-18 02:51:30 PM

tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.


Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying. But, I guess it's fun to think about. Or something.
 
2013-02-18 02:51:33 PM
Is Voyager heading  toward the supernova?  HTH did that happen?
 
2013-02-18 02:52:43 PM

Fark In The Duck: Is Voyager heading  toward the supernova?  HTH did that happen?


It got lost.  It was built by men and driven by men.
 
2013-02-18 02:57:28 PM

KiwDaWabbit: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying. But, I guess it's fun to think about. Or something.


I believe the current thinking is that the Earth will be uninhabitable in about a billion years or so. Plenty of time to do what we've got to do, if it's even possible. It's likely that some other catastrophic event will destroy humanity well before then, though.
 
2013-02-18 02:57:38 PM
Better chance of Voyager I being ripped apart by space debris.
 
2013-02-18 02:58:55 PM
I saw one of the Voyagers get blasted by a Klingon in the 23rd century.

And the Starman guys nabbed another one so they could listen to Kurt Waldhiem DJ a Mozart sonata.

I don't think this artist watches enough SyFy....
 
2013-02-18 02:58:56 PM
That's VGER to you, carbon-based life form.
 
2013-02-18 03:03:59 PM

Fark In The Duck: Is Voyager heading  toward the supernova?  HTH did that happen?



An encounter with a heavier object set Voyager on a very, very, very long elliptical orbit around the Sun?
 
2013-02-18 03:04:21 PM
FTA: From a creative standpoint, Rozema wanted to explore our preconceived perceptions of how the universe appears which are fed to us by existing imagery from sources such NASA or even sci-fi films. By creating a generated universe, Rozema was able to take his own 'camera' to other angles and places within the cosmos.

That's it! The only way to fight National Geographic is with moar National Geographic!
 
2013-02-18 03:04:53 PM

KiwDaWabbit: Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying.


Actually, we only have about a billion years. The sun will get larger and hotter, and at that point it will be too hot to support life on Earth, and the oceans and atmosphere will evaporate.

That's plenty of time to develop FTL travel. Or move to Mars.
 
2013-02-18 03:05:59 PM
If man is still alive
if woman can survive
 
2013-02-18 03:18:17 PM

tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.


Why is it important that we survive?
 
2013-02-18 03:19:06 PM
Cochrane, get that warp drive up and running before the Borg figure out how to travel back in time to sabotage your efforts.
 
2013-02-18 03:20:26 PM
Has a front-row seat:

mutantreviewers.files.wordpress.com
 
2013-02-18 03:27:20 PM

kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?


Well, I....uh....

Hm.
 
2013-02-18 03:36:00 PM

kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?


It isn't.
 
2013-02-18 03:50:13 PM

kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?


Because fark you that's why.

/kidding
 
2013-02-18 03:51:17 PM

bingo the psych-o: Fark In The Duck: Is Voyager heading  toward the supernova?  HTH did that happen?


An encounter with a heavier object set Voyager on a very, very, very long elliptical orbit around the Sun?


That's where Rosie O'Donnell went after they cancelled her show...
 
2013-02-18 04:00:26 PM
I gotta admit I was a little moved by this...
 
2013-02-18 04:02:19 PM

Fark In The Duck: Is Voyager heading  toward the supernova?  HTH did that happen?


It did the Asteroids maneuver.

spyhunter007.com
 
2013-02-18 04:09:44 PM

kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?


Well it's really not important that yousurvive.
 
2013-02-18 04:10:26 PM
I have Fark's new auto format crap.
 
2013-02-18 04:11:06 PM

make me some tea: I believe the current thinking is that the Earth will be uninhabitable in about a billion years or so. Plenty of time to do what we've got to do, if it's even possible. It's likely that some other catastrophic event will destroy humanity well before then, though.


If we haven't died off or fallen into savagery, I think that we will likely be able to move the Earth's orbit to keep it in the goldilock's zone. Strap some engines on some large asteroids and send the, on close flybys over the course of a few thousand years to impart more energy into the Earth's orbit, which will slowly move it out farther out in the gravity well as the Sun expands.
 
2013-02-18 04:13:10 PM

Ishkur: KiwDaWabbit: Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying.

Actually, we only have about a billion years. The sun will get larger and hotter, and at that point it will be too hot to support life on Earth, and the oceans and atmosphere will evaporate.

That's plenty of time to develop FTL travel. Or move to Mars.

Yes, because it will be a big difference to move - celestially speaking - 2 steps back from an exploding sun.
 
2013-02-18 04:18:59 PM

kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?


Is there any particular reason we shouldn't try?
 
2013-02-18 04:19:58 PM
There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

www.daviddarling.info
 
2013-02-18 04:21:35 PM
Let see, NASA predicts at it's current speed of 17km/s it would reach the distance of Proxima Centauri (4.25 ly) in roughly 80,000yrs. Giving that the Sun is expected to blow up in roughly 5 billion years that means that Voyager 1 (baring it being shot up by Klingons) will be apporx 14,700 ly from Earth when the Sun goes so sadly it will barely be visible to Voyager 1 if at all.

On a side now, people talking about how we have plenty of time as a civilization before the Sun consumes the Earth in 5 billion years, but actually our time is much shorter since as the Sun slowly swells the Earth will be uninhabitable in about 1 billion years.
 
2013-02-18 04:28:13 PM

dennysgod: On a side now, people talking about how we have plenty of time as a civilization before the Sun consumes the Earth in 5 billion years, but actually our time is much shorter since as the Sun slowly swells the Earth will be uninhabitable in about 1 billion years.


Oh great, we're f*cked.
 
2013-02-18 04:29:57 PM

shanrick: If man is still alive
if woman can survive


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-EHSOCLbgM
 
2013-02-18 04:30:02 PM

Farkomatic: Yes, because it will be a big difference to move - celestially speaking - 2 steps back from an exploding sun.


The Sun isn't the type of star that really explodes, per se. There's a point when it'll turn into a planetary nebula, but that's a much less violent process than a supernova (though the Earth is still totally screwed).

What I can't help but wonder is what will happen to the gas giants. Jupiter, for example, doesn't have quite enough mass to collapse into a star in its own right, but it's close: might it scoop up enough mass from the nebula to make that transition?
 
2013-02-18 04:38:13 PM

dennysgod: On a side now, people talking about how we have plenty of time as a civilization before the Sun consumes the Earth in 5 billion years, but actually our time is much shorter since as the Sun slowly swells the Earth will be uninhabitable in about 1 billion years.


Not even that long. A fifteen percent increase in solar energy output is enough to make the Earth barren. Estimates as to that range from 100 million to 250 million years.

MORGAN FREEMAN TOLD ME SO.
 
2013-02-18 04:38:33 PM
Mad_Radhu:
If we haven't died off or fallen into savagery, I think that we will likely be able to move the Earth's orbit to keep it in the goldilock's zone. Strap some engines on some large asteroids and send the, on close flybys over the course of a few thousand years to impart more energy into the Earth's orbit, which will slowly move it out farther out in the gravity well as the Sun expands.

You seriously think the barely-evolved monkeys, slaves to our raging limbic systems, will make it to becoming a mid-Type-1 civilization?  We'll be lucky if we make it past Type 0 at all.
 
2013-02-18 04:38:57 PM

Ishkur: KiwDaWabbit: Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying.

Actually, we only have about a billion years. The sun will get larger and hotter, and at that point it will be too hot to support life on Earth, and the oceans and atmosphere will evaporate.

That's plenty of time to develop FTL travel. Or move to Mars.


That only delays the inevitable. Eventually, we'll succumb to the heat death of the universe unless we figure out a way to travel to other universes or create new ones.

Hmmm, that make me wonder if the Big Bang was started to allow another race of very old beings to survive their own universe winding down.
 
2013-02-18 04:49:51 PM
At our current rate, the sun will be uninhabitable in only 100 years!
 
2013-02-18 04:55:08 PM

DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]


I was trying to decide to post that or not since it was actually a Pioneer...
 
2013-02-18 04:56:11 PM

DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]


s12.postimage.org
 
2013-02-18 04:58:41 PM

kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?


Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.
 
2013-02-18 05:00:09 PM

tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.


Do you think evolution has stopped for us? Are you sure anything remotely resembling humans will be around in 4 billion years? And are you really concerned about this "we", but I'm sure you're against life extension.
 
2013-02-18 05:02:38 PM

Mad_Radhu: Eventually, we'll succumb to the heat death of the universe unless we figure out a way to travel to other universes or create new ones.


Heat death isn't something even a civilization should be worried about.  That's on the scale of trillions of years.

However, it would be sad if we got as far as becoming aware of our place in the universe, only to decline and perish with the rest of life on this planet because we simply didn't make good use of the ample time we had.
 
2013-02-18 05:07:38 PM

Lord Farkwad: DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]

[s12.postimage.org image 600x450]


What episode is that from?
 
2013-02-18 05:08:29 PM
graphics8.nytimes.com
 
2013-02-18 05:09:04 PM

ShadowLAnCeR: Lord Farkwad: DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]

[s12.postimage.org image 600x450]

What episode is that from?


My guess is The Inner Light
 
2013-02-18 05:09:23 PM

Cyno01: DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]

I was trying to decide to post that or not since it was actually a Pioneer...


s9.postimage.org
 
2013-02-18 05:11:40 PM

make me some tea: KiwDaWabbit: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying. But, I guess it's fun to think about. Or something.

I believe the current thinking is that the Earth will be uninhabitable in about a billion years or so. Plenty of time to do what we've got to do, if it's even possible. It's likely that some other catastrophic event will destroy humanity well before then, though.


My money's on super volcano.
 
2013-02-18 05:12:37 PM

ShadowLAnCeR: Lord Farkwad: DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]

[s12.postimage.org image 600x450]

What episode is that from?




http://en.memory-alpha.org/wiki/The_Inner_Light_%28episode%29
 
2013-02-18 05:29:43 PM
by the time the sun goes supernova space Indiana Jones will have saved the voyager from space Nazi's and placed it into a space museum where it belongs.
 
2013-02-18 05:33:44 PM

ArtosRC: dennysgod: On a side now, people talking about how we have plenty of time as a civilization before the Sun consumes the Earth in 5 billion years, but actually our time is much shorter since as the Sun slowly swells the Earth will be uninhabitable in about 1 billion years.

Not even that long. A fifteen percent increase in solar energy output is enough to make the Earth barren. Estimates as to that range from 100 million to 250 million years.

MORGAN FREEMAN TOLD ME SO.


Current best estimates are something like 600 - 700 million years before larger life forms are no longer sustainable due to CO2 being sequestered into the ground because of increased heat from the sun.  That would kill off all the plants. Oddly enough anthropological caused release of CO2 (should we last long enough) would prevent this. Yes I note the irony of the causes of global warming.  Bad now. Good way way later.
 
2013-02-18 05:40:48 PM

dennysgod: Let see, NASA predicts at it's current speed of 17km/s it would reach the distance of Proxima Centauri (4.25 ly) in roughly 80,000yrs. Giving that the Sun is expected to blow up in roughly 5 billion years that means that Voyager 1 (baring it being shot up by Klingons) will be apporx 14,700 ly from Earth when the Sun goes so sadly it will barely be visible to Voyager 1 if at all.

On a side now, people talking about how we have plenty of time as a civilization before the Sun consumes the Earth in 5 billion years, but actually our time is much shorter since as the Sun slowly swells the Earth will be uninhabitable in about 1 billion years.


Your math is way off.

In 5 billion years Voyager 1 will be roughly 250,000 light years away from Earth, well outside the Galaxy.  Assuming it continues at constant velocity all that time.  At 4.25 ly per 80000yr, that's 1ly per ~18823 years.  5,000,000,000 / 18,823 = ~265,632.
 
2013-02-18 05:49:17 PM
Then there's the whole thing that in 5 billion years, we (and Voyager) will have revolved around the galaxy some 25 times, with all of those various interactions, stellar movements and the like.
 
2013-02-18 05:50:25 PM

Farkomatic: Ishkur: KiwDaWabbit: Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying.

Actually, we only have about a billion years. The sun will get larger and hotter, and at that point it will be too hot to support life on Earth, and the oceans and atmosphere will evaporate.

That's plenty of time to develop FTL travel. Or move to Mars.
Yes, because it will be a big difference to move - celestially speaking - 2 steps back from an exploding sun.


Are sun is unlikely to ever actually explode, it just doesn't have the mass. Erratic, violent radiation will probably be our biggest concern as we go off main sequence. The interesting thing about colonizing the solar system is if we don't tackle the problems of micro gravity then we're going to see some really interesting divergence in human evolution. If Humans colonized Mars, and the moons of the Gas Giants the colonists would probably in a very short period of time no longer be what we'd call human. They would no longer look like the humans left living on Earth and would be unlikely able to survive on Earth. Likewise the humans colonizing Ganymede would be different from the humans colonizing Mars because of the difference in gravity. We'd be living in closed environments where we'd have air an protection from the elements but unless we can come up with an artificial gravity Homo sapien as you know it will end with the Earth.
 
2013-02-18 05:54:19 PM

Mad_Radhu: Ishkur: KiwDaWabbit: Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying.

Actually, we only have about a billion years. The sun will get larger and hotter, and at that point it will be too hot to support life on Earth, and the oceans and atmosphere will evaporate.

That's plenty of time to develop FTL travel. Or move to Mars.

That only delays the inevitable. Eventually, we'll succumb to the heat death of the universe unless we figure out a way to travel to other universes or create new ones.

Hmmm, that make me wonder if the Big Bang was started to allow another race of very old beings to survive their own universe winding down.


Here you go:

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-02-18 05:54:26 PM

mrlewish: ArtosRC: dennysgod: On a side now, people talking about how we have plenty of time as a civilization before the Sun consumes the Earth in 5 billion years, but actually our time is much shorter since as the Sun slowly swells the Earth will be uninhabitable in about 1 billion years.

Not even that long. A fifteen percent increase in solar energy output is enough to make the Earth barren. Estimates as to that range from 100 million to 250 million years.

MORGAN FREEMAN TOLD ME SO.

Current best estimates are something like 600 - 700 million years before larger life forms are no longer sustainable due to CO2 being sequestered into the ground because of increased heat from the sun.  That would kill off all the plants. Oddly enough anthropological caused release of CO2 (should we last long enough) would prevent this. Yes I note the irony of the causes of global warming.  Bad now. Good way way later.


Typical Earth resident, 700M. AD:
i18.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-18 05:54:40 PM

Anenu: by the time the sun goes supernova space Indiana Jones will have saved the voyager from space Nazi's and placed it into a space museum where it belongs.


We have top aliens working on it. Top. Aliens.
 
2013-02-18 06:00:30 PM

Ishkur: KiwDaWabbit: Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying.

Actually, we only have about a billion years. The sun will get larger and hotter, and at that point it will be too hot to support life on Earth, and the oceans and atmosphere will evaporate.

That's plenty of time to develop FTL travel. Or move to Mars.


Or shove a huge fusion ramjet into the atmosphere of Neptune and drag the earth to the outer solar system.
 
2013-02-18 06:04:48 PM

No Such Agency: Mad_Radhu:
If we haven't died off or fallen into savagery, I think that we will likely be able to move the Earth's orbit to keep it in the goldilock's zone. Strap some engines on some large asteroids and send the, on close flybys over the course of a few thousand years to impart more energy into the Earth's orbit, which will slowly move it out farther out in the gravity well as the Sun expands.

You seriously think the barely-evolved monkeys, slaves to our raging limbic systems, will make it to becoming a mid-Type-1 civilization?  We'll be lucky if we make it past Type 0 at all.


Oh, look. Another self-loathing misanthropist. How quaint.
 
2013-02-18 06:12:59 PM
One of my fav "the universe is ending" books: "Dark Is The Sun" by Philip Jose Farmer.   Sure, the science now appears to be completely wrong, but still a fun read for the time (I was 12 when it was published).

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2013-02-18 06:22:03 PM

UNC_Samurai: kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?

Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.


Shouldn't you be traveling backward in time to help with a great war?
 
2013-02-18 06:24:32 PM

Lord Farkwad: DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]

[s12.postimage.org image 600x450]


images3.wikia.nocookie.net

www.neutralzone.de

The Klingons probably have the right idea... blast all space probes.
 
2013-02-18 06:25:11 PM

MithrandirBooga: shanrick: If man is still alive
if woman can survive

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-EHSOCLbgM


From Futurama:  http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJ92Y2Hsc2w
 
2013-02-18 06:33:31 PM

LrdPhoenix: dennysgod: Let see, NASA predicts at it's current speed of 17km/s it would reach the distance of Proxima Centauri (4.25 ly) in roughly 80,000yrs. Giving that the Sun is expected to blow up in roughly 5 billion years that means that Voyager 1 (baring it being shot up by Klingons) will be apporx 14,700 ly from Earth when the Sun goes so sadly it will barely be visible to Voyager 1 if at all.

On a side now, people talking about how we have plenty of time as a civilization before the Sun consumes the Earth in 5 billion years, but actually our time is much shorter since as the Sun slowly swells the Earth will be uninhabitable in about 1 billion years.

Your math is way off.

In 5 billion years Voyager 1 will be roughly 250,000 light years away from Earth, well outside the Galaxy.  Assuming it continues at constant velocity all that time.  At 4.25 ly per 80000yr, that's 1ly per ~18823 years.  5,000,000,000 / 18,823 = ~265,632.


While the Voyagers have escape velocity from our Sun, they are not moving fast enough to leave our galaxy.  After departing our solar system it will continue in an orbit of the galactic center.

You're otherwise correct that after 5 billion years of flight, if it hasn't been drawn into a gravity well it passes, the Sun will be a vastly distant point of light, unlike in the video.
 
2013-02-18 06:39:01 PM
That made absolutely no sense. But it was real purty.
 
2013-02-18 06:39:09 PM

Sgeo: <b><a href="http://www.fark.com/comments/7599077/82586078#c82586078" target="_blank">MithrandirBooga</a>:</b> <i>shanrick: If man is still alive
if woman can survive

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-EHSOCLbgM</i>

From Futurama:  <a href="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJ92Y2Hsc2w" target="_blank">http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vJ92Y2Hsc2w</a>


That is the greatest Futurama episode ever.
 
2013-02-18 06:54:37 PM

mark.jms: Mad_Radhu: Ishkur: KiwDaWabbit: Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying.

Actually, we only have about a billion years. The sun will get larger and hotter, and at that point it will be too hot to support life on Earth, and the oceans and atmosphere will evaporate.

That's plenty of time to develop FTL travel. Or move to Mars.

That only delays the inevitable. Eventually, we'll succumb to the heat death of the universe unless we figure out a way to travel to other universes or create new ones.

Hmmm, that make me wonder if the Big Bang was started to allow another race of very old beings to survive their own universe winding down.

Here you go:

[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x299]


Is that the one where they send a probe piloted by intelligent squid?
 
2013-02-18 06:59:21 PM

mark.jms: Mad_Radhu: Ishkur: KiwDaWabbit: Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying.

Actually, we only have about a billion years. The sun will get larger and hotter, and at that point it will be too hot to support life on Earth, and the oceans and atmosphere will evaporate.

That's plenty of time to develop FTL travel. Or move to Mars.

That only delays the inevitable. Eventually, we'll succumb to the heat death of the universe unless we figure out a way to travel to other universes or create new ones.

Hmmm, that make me wonder if the Big Bang was started to allow another race of very old beings to survive their own universe winding down.

Here you go:

[upload.wikimedia.org image 200x299]


Oh, and if you like that one this is highly recommended:

d.gr-assets.com
 
2013-02-18 07:06:01 PM

smimmy: make me some tea: KiwDaWabbit: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying. But, I guess it's fun to think about. Or something.

I believe the current thinking is that the Earth will be uninhabitable in about a billion years or so. Plenty of time to do what we've got to do, if it's even possible. It's likely that some other catastrophic event will destroy humanity well before then, though.

My money's on super volcano.


Yup. Not much any level of tech can do to stop the Earth from taking a huge poop every so often.
 
2013-02-18 07:22:29 PM
Should we be embarrassed by the fact that 1 billion years from now an alien race could find our Voyager or Pioneer probes and read the plaques on the sides to see we were so stupid as to once consider Pluto as a planet?
 
2013-02-18 07:24:51 PM

PsyLord: Lord Farkwad: DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]

[s12.postimage.org image 600x450]

[images3.wikia.nocookie.net image 531x395]

[www.neutralzone.de image 531x398]

The Klingons probably have the right idea... blast all space probes.


Especially the asteroid one, because it transforms your starship into stupid Inca-like designs and makes the episode unbearable to watch!
 
2013-02-18 07:26:37 PM

Cyno01: DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]

I was trying to decide to post that or not since it was actually a Pioneer...


I figured it was going along with the humor of the thread, so why not post it, even if it's a different space probe. :)
 
2013-02-18 07:38:31 PM

make me some tea: KiwDaWabbit: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying. But, I guess it's fun to think about. Or something.

I believe the current thinking is that the Earth will be uninhabitable in about a billion years or so. Plenty of time to do what we've got to do, if it's even possible. It's likely that some other catastrophic event will destroy humanity well before then, though.


To be specific:

In about 600 million years, the level of CO2will fall below the level needed to sustain C3carbon fixation photosynthesis used by trees. Some plants use the C4  carbon fixation method, allowing them to persist at CO2 concentrations as low as 10 parts per million. However, the long-term trend is for plant life to die off altogether. The resulting loss of oxygen replenishment will cause the extinction of animal life a few million years later.

Citation:  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Future_of_the_Earth
 
2013-02-18 07:44:39 PM
Voyager > DS9
 
2013-02-18 07:57:30 PM

Ishkur: KiwDaWabbit: Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying.

Actually, we only have about a billion years. The sun will get larger and hotter, and at that point it will be too hot to support life on Earth, and the oceans and atmosphere will evaporate.

That's plenty of time to develop FTL travel. Or move to Mars.

In a billion years, "humanity" won't exist.


Even if there isn't a catastrophic event wiping out our species, the critters populating the solar system in a billion years time, some of which species might even be descended from us, will be so different from us that they couldn't rightly be called humans. Stop and think about how long a billion years is in evolutionary time. Think about how different we are from our ancestors that existed a billion years ago.

 
2013-02-18 08:33:41 PM

chewielouie: Voyager > DS9


If you're a moron.
 
2013-02-18 08:42:19 PM
Ugh, has anyone ever been able to stream HD from Vimeo?  I've never been able to with either connection at my last company, Cox Cable, Comcast Cable, Clear WiMax, or Verizon LTE.  This is actually one of the fastest loading HD clips I've seen on Vimeo but it still took 5:10 to move the data for a 4:00 video.

I don't understand why anyone hosts their HD content on Vimeo.
 
2013-02-18 08:59:03 PM
I liked the music. Anyone here know the name of the song?
 
2013-02-18 09:02:46 PM

Ed Grubermann: Ishkur: KiwDaWabbit: Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying.

Actually, we only have about a billion years. The sun will get larger and hotter, and at that point it will be too hot to support life on Earth, and the oceans and atmosphere will evaporate.

That's plenty of time to develop FTL travel. Or move to Mars.

Or shove a huge fusion ramjet into the atmosphere of Neptune and drag the earth to the outer solar system.


Have you read "The Jupiter Theft?" More likely we'll slightly extend the life of Earth by surrounding it with a protective cloud of particles. Colonizing other planets and moons is too much trouble. By then, the majority of humanity will be living in many miles-long spinning, enclosed capsules of rock and metal. We'll build these space colonies by crushing rock and passing it through the focus of a big solar mirror. Essentially a gigantic 3D printer. Earth will still be fully populated, but there will be far more Humans living in interplanetary space around Sol. They'll survive Sol's evolution into a white dwarf. But even if we don't discover FTL, we'll send miniaturized robotic seeder ships to every star within a hundred light years. Those ships will build colonies when they arrive and humans will be cloned and artificially born and raised. There will indeed be modern humans millions of years from now, because of these slow-traveling cradles. Who is to say our solar system isn't already full of another race's space colonies? Or perhaps we are mistaken about evolution and are the children of a colony our race sent out millions of years ago? What if we and other races are in competition, hunting down and destroying each other's colonies? Or perhaps few, if any races ever leave home, and the universe's ancient red and white dwarfs are mostly surrounded by halos of long-dead colonies. If you think about it, the typical big-eyed "grey alien" sounds like something evolved to live in dim light, artificial habitats...
 
2013-02-18 09:04:35 PM
Forgot to say that The Jupiter Theft was about Jupiter being used as a fuel source to move a planet, not about the rest of what I wrote.
 
2013-02-18 09:16:27 PM

Austinoftx: Essentially a gigantic 3D printer.


Aw man, now you've done it.

/abandons thread before QA reads that post
 
2013-02-18 09:18:47 PM

UNC_Samurai: kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?

Whether it happens in a hundred years or a thousand years or a million years, eventually our Sun will grow cold and go out. When that happens, it won't just take us. It'll take Marilyn Monroe, and Lao-Tzu, and Einstein, and Morobuto, and Buddy Holly, and Aristophanes, and - all of this - all of this - was for nothing. Unless we go to the stars.


All of those people you mention are already gone. As for their contribution to human society all we can do is delay the inevitable.  Even if we could star hop sooner or later the entire universe will be dead anyway.

Really, everything we strive for, as individuals and as societies is meaningless. It doesn't matter whether we cease to exist today or in a trillion years. The end result is the same - once we are gone it's as if we never existed.
 
2013-02-18 09:20:18 PM

qorkfiend: kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?

Is there any particular reason we shouldn't try?


There is a reason we will try and that is it's part of our nature to want to survive. But in the bigger picture it's not at all important.
 
2013-02-18 09:20:37 PM
Long before the death of the sun, the human race will have fulfilled its destiny: creating the intelligent machines that will colonize space.
 
2013-02-18 09:22:22 PM

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?

Well it's really not important that yousurvive.


That is very true.
 
2013-02-18 09:23:09 PM

kudayta: kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?

Because fark you that's why.

/kidding


Can't you wait till we get home?
 
2013-02-18 09:31:56 PM

Doc Daneeka: Ishkur: KiwDaWabbit: Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying.

Actually, we only have about a billion years. The sun will get larger and hotter, and at that point it will be too hot to support life on Earth, and the oceans and atmosphere will evaporate.

That's plenty of time to develop FTL travel. Or move to Mars.
In a billion years, "humanity" won't exist.
Even if there isn't a catastrophic event wiping out our species, the critters populating the solar system in a billion years time, some of which species might even be descended from us, will be so different from us that they couldn't rightly be called humans. Stop and think about how long a billion years is in evolutionary time. Think about how different we are from our ancestors that existed a billion years ago.


We've kind of hit an evolutionary dead end as a species because we no longer adapt to our environment we adapt our environment to us. Even our brains aren't likely to get much better because the lesser intelligent of us are able to employ with reasonable success the technologies developed the intellectually superiors of our species. Disease still pushes evolutionary changes but even that will become conquered by technology at some point in our future. It would take a radical environmental change to cause our species to evolve further. Something so radical that even our technology couldn't adapt to it. Colonization of other worlds would be such an environmental change because when we first start colonizing other bodies in the solar system it is unlikely that we would have the technological means to effect gravity on a planetary scale. It would probably be easier to re-engineer our bodies for life in a micro gravity environment than it would be to create an earth like gravity on Mars or the moons of Jupiter.

Of course depending on our mastery of energy and matter we might simply do things like move the Earth and possibly Venus into the new Goldilock zone for our ageing sun or perhaps gather up the asteroids and send them colliding into Mars until we've built it up into a planet with a mass similar to Earth (if I recall correctly there should be ample material in the asteroid belt to easily double the mass of Mars). We might also combine several Gas Giant moons into an earth sized body. It all depends on at what point on the technological scale we're at when we decide to spread ourselves across the solar system and even the galaxy.

Now there is a certain amount of genetic drift that moves evolution along but we've kind of developed an idea of what it is to be a human and we'd probably correct for that along the way. Of course there might be a culture of humans who don't want to correct for genetic drift or even correct for a different environment and they may wish to allow nature to take its course which means we could see a new subspecies or even a new species of humans arise along side Homo sapiens.
 
2013-02-18 09:54:58 PM

ShadowLAnCeR: Lord Farkwad: DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]

[s12.postimage.org image 600x450]

What episode is that from?


That's the one where he gets taken over by the probe from the "library" and he lives an entire life on the other planet in one episode.  He is a scientist, marries, has children, grows old, only to have the sun take out their civilization.  Then he comes back from the probe.  Which is really super cool since that's what he always thinks about doing with his life and the only regrets he has and he gets to live them anyway.
 
2013-02-18 09:57:49 PM

Ghastly: We've kind of hit an evolutionary dead end as a species because we no longer adapt to our environment we adapt our environment to us. Even our brains aren't likely to get much better because the lesser intelligent of us are able to employ with reasonable success the technologies developed the intellectually superiors of our species.


Interesting thoughts. So you think we're going the way of the Thrint? (sci-fi universe of Lary Niven)

However, I disagree with your assumption that we must build Earthlike planets. Building space colonies out of sintered rock dust will bring results far FAR more quickly and flexibly than tossing a bunch of shiat together and hoping we can live on it in 100,000 years. We'll continue frantically evolving in the many possible artificial environments, not to mention whenever genetic experimentation takes place.

If you're determined to live on a planet, why not build 100 trillion invincible soap bubbles each the size of a continent and toss them atop Saturn's atmosphere. Then, build a surface atop those, terraform, and you've got a world with Earthlike gravity that is millions of times bigger than the homeworld.
 
2013-02-18 09:57:55 PM

brandent: ShadowLAnCeR: Lord Farkwad: DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]

[s12.postimage.org image 600x450]

What episode is that from?

That's the one where he gets taken over by the probe from the "library" and he lives an entire life on the other planet in one episode.  He is a scientist, marries, has children, grows old, only to have the sun take out their civilization.  Then he comes back from the probe.  Which is really super cool since that's what he always thinks about doing with his life and the only regrets he has and he gets to live them anyway.


The fact that you had to explain the ep makes me vaguely sad. I thought that one was supposed to be a fan favorite?
 
2013-02-18 10:08:56 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Do you think evolution has stopped for us?


Evolution has not stopped for us, but the mechanisms driving it have shifted drastically. The last big incidence of natural selection in humans was probably the Black Plague. Since then, we've become so effective at preventing the sorts of events that otherwise drive natural selection from actually doing so that the next thing big enough to overcome those defenses will probably have to be be big enough to kill us all (as long as humanity is confined to Earth, anyway).

The big driver in modern human evolution is cultural ideals. Those certainly produce change over time, but tend very, very strongly toward being recognizably human as we know it: two eyes, two ears, and so on. I do not think we'll see enough variation to cause true speciation.

And are you really concerned about this "we", but I'm sure you're against life extension.

It's true that the eventual but inevitable death of the Earth, humanity, and the Universe is, to me, nothing but an abstract concept. It's beyond my comprehension, except as something very unpleasant, and for that reason it is something I would like to see avoided, or at least see progress made toward its avoidance.

The eventuality of my own death, though: that's something more concrete, something I've accepted because frankly there is no choice in the matter. The overwhelming majority of "life extension" over the course of history is nothing but a statistical illusion: fewer people are dying at younger ages, but the high end of life hasn't actually changed all that much. There is little reason to believe that this will change, and so I prefer to put my support behind something that might one day be doable.
 
2013-02-18 10:16:51 PM

fusillade762: brandent: ShadowLAnCeR: Lord Farkwad: DarkSoulNoHope: There is one problem with that theory in how long Voyager I will last...

[www.daviddarling.info image 800x357]

[s12.postimage.org image 600x450]

What episode is that from?

That's the one where he gets taken over by the probe from the "library" and he lives an entire life on the other planet in one episode.  He is a scientist, marries, has children, grows old, only to have the sun take out their civilization.  Then he comes back from the probe.  Which is really super cool since that's what he always thinks about doing with his life and the only regrets he has and he gets to live them anyway.

The fact that you had to explain the ep makes me vaguely sad. I thought that one was supposed to be a fan favorite?


The Inner Light was my favourite Star Trek episode of all time.

I thought the movie Generations really dropped the ball. When Picard was in the Nexus the family he had should have been the family he raised on The Inner Light.
 
2013-02-18 10:19:02 PM

Austinoftx: Ghastly: We've kind of hit an evolutionary dead end as a species because we no longer adapt to our environment we adapt our environment to us. Even our brains aren't likely to get much better because the lesser intelligent of us are able to employ with reasonable success the technologies developed the intellectually superiors of our species.

Interesting thoughts. So you think we're going the way of the Thrint? (sci-fi universe of Lary Niven)

However, I disagree with your assumption that we must build Earthlike planets. Building space colonies out of sintered rock dust will bring results far FAR more quickly and flexibly than tossing a bunch of shiat together and hoping we can live on it in 100,000 years. We'll continue frantically evolving in the many possible artificial environments, not to mention whenever genetic experimentation takes place.

If you're determined to live on a planet, why not build 100 trillion invincible soap bubbles each the size of a continent and toss them atop Saturn's atmosphere. Then, build a surface atop those, terraform, and you've got a world with Earthlike gravity that is millions of times bigger than the homeworld.


I think it would be simpler to move Earth, Venus, and enlarge Mars than to create a world atop something as turbulent as the atmosphere of Saturn.
 
2013-02-18 10:23:31 PM
Came for Morbo and "STARS DON'T DIE THAT WAY!".  Leaving disappointed.
 
2013-02-18 10:28:56 PM

Ghastly: I think it would be simpler to move Earth, Venus, and enlarge Mars than to create a world atop something as turbulent as the atmosphere of Saturn.


Like the calm surface of foam atop a rapid stream. And bubbles are conceivably small enough for mere human technology to move. Automation could make it possible within a few tens of thousands of years. Moving planets is something that would take billions of years of flat-out total effort, and we don't have nearly enough of those.
 
2013-02-18 10:42:45 PM

Millennium: The last big incidence of natural selection in humans was probably the Black Plague.


The Colombian Exchange would like to say something about that.
 
2013-02-18 11:13:47 PM

theorellior: Millennium: The last big incidence of natural selection in humans was probably the Black Plague.

The Colombian Exchange would like to say something about that.


Could that really be considered natural selection, though? I always thought it was more like a form of warfare.
 
2013-02-18 11:15:56 PM
the sea is gone
the sky, and the moon
all is gone
 
2013-02-19 12:52:29 AM

kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?


So we can deliver the message.....
 
2013-02-19 12:54:22 AM

dennysgod: Let see, NASA predicts at it's current speed of 17km/s it would reach the distance of Proxima Centauri (4.25 ly) in roughly 80,000yrs. Giving that the Sun is expected to blow up in roughly 5 billion years that means that Voyager 1 (baring it being shot up by Klingons) will be apporx 14,700 ly from Earth when the Sun goes so sadly it will barely be visible to Voyager 1 if at all.

On a side now, people talking about how we have plenty of time as a civilization before the Sun consumes the Earth in 5 billion years, but actually our time is much shorter since as the Sun slowly swells the Earth will be uninhabitable in about 1 billion years.


And my arthritis will be really pissing me off....
 
2013-02-19 12:59:26 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Do you think evolution has stopped for us? Are you sure anything remotely resembling humans will be around in 4 billion years? And are you really concerned about this "we", but I'm sure you're against life extension.


You seem so absolutely certain that everyone is against the ideas you've glommed onto. Seriously.

Personally, I read Harrington 40 years ago. It's been part of my conceptual package ever sense.
 
2013-02-19 08:09:45 AM
Natural selection hasn't stopped. Our perspective in the First World is biased. We still live on a planet, right now, in the 21st century, when many millions die every year from starvation, disease, privation, natural disasters, and other natural causes.

Aside from that, I think it is very presumptuous to assume we could ever stop evolution.  The one constant in the biological universe is change. Natural selection is but one driver of evolutionary change - there are several others.

Our descendants in a billion years (if our evolutionary line has not gone extinct) will look so unlike us that we wouldn't recognize them as human.
 
2013-02-19 08:19:11 AM

Ed Grubermann: Ishkur: KiwDaWabbit: Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying.

Actually, we only have about a billion years. The sun will get larger and hotter, and at that point it will be too hot to support life on Earth, and the oceans and atmosphere will evaporate.

That's plenty of time to develop FTL travel. Or move to Mars.

Or shove a huge fusion ramjet into the atmosphere of Neptune and drag the earth to the outer solar system.


Sounds like a good idea, meatsicle.
 
2013-02-19 10:44:51 AM

Doc Daneeka: The one constant in the biological universe is change.


Horseshoe crabs didn't get the memo, I guess.
 
2013-02-19 11:04:41 AM
At first I was having a hard-time getting past the scientific inaccuracy, so the science nerd in me hated this.  Then the canned, generic upbeat music you hear in every "meaningful" video clip these days coupled with the cliched, quick-shot montage near the end got the art dork side of me pissed off.

Very rare when I find something that I can hate on both levels.  If that's what the creator was going for, bravo.  You succeeded beyond expectation.
 
2013-02-19 03:53:49 PM

dragonchild: Doc Daneeka: The one constant in the biological universe is change.

Horseshoe crabs didn't get the memo, I guess.


THIS. Evolution doesn't just keep happening to a species for shiats and giggles. Once a species like cockroaches or alligators hit on a good survival gimmick, they tend to stick with it and not change that much over millions of years. Humans have hit on the best survival gimmick of them all, and the only selection that we'll likely see is of the artificial kind if genetic engineering ever becomes widespread and acceptable.
 
2013-02-19 05:10:34 PM

kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?


So far as we know, we're the only part of the universe that's capable of looking at the other parts are appreciate them. Even if there are others, it's an extremely rare thing and our own perspective would remain unique.

Now, perhaps there's no objectively sound reason that I can offer you starting from axiomatic first principles (which isn't surprising given how hard it is to say anything meaningful when you do that), but I would certainly contend that this is a sufficient reason to hope that we'll persist.
 
2013-02-19 05:12:11 PM

burning_bridge: At first I was having a hard-time getting past the scientific inaccuracy, so the science nerd in me hated this.  Then the canned, generic upbeat music you hear in every "meaningful" video clip these days coupled with the cliched, quick-shot montage near the end got the art dork side of me pissed off.

Very rare when I find something that I can hate on both levels.  If that's what the creator was going for, bravo.  You succeeded beyond expectation.


Given that the author took pains to note that it wasn't supposed to be scientifically accurate, it seems a bit harsh to ding him on that. It's a bit like complaining that zombie movies do a really unrealistic job depicting necropathy.
 
2013-02-19 09:00:29 PM

KiwDaWabbit: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Yeah, it's kind of mind blowing to think about. If humanity doesn't figure out a way to settle another planet, we will go extinct. Of course, I would imagine that there's a pretty high probability of us going extinct a few billion years before the sun starts dying. But, I guess it's fun to think about. Or something.


You know that the universe itself will die, including everything in it, right? There is no such thing as escaping extinction, only postponing it.
 
2013-02-19 11:47:02 PM

Some 'Splainin' To Do: kg2095: tgambitg: Most everything beyond the asteroid belt will survive the death of our sun, barring some odd event that causes out sun to go through the extremely unlikely event of a supernova. The trick is to make sure that we seed ourselves elsewhere to make sure that WE survive. And to reduce resource use here.

Why is it important that we survive?

So far as we know, we're the only part of the universe that's capable of looking at the other parts are appreciate them. Even if there are others, it's an extremely rare thing and our own perspective would remain unique.

Now, perhaps there's no objectively sound reason that I can offer you starting from axiomatic first principles (which isn't surprising given how hard it is to say anything meaningful when you do that), but I would certainly contend that this is a sufficient reason to hope that we'll persist.


But why is that important?  In the end the whole universe will be cold and dead, so anything that was important will no longer be so.
 
2013-02-20 06:26:35 AM

LoneWolf343: There is no such thing as escaping extinction, only postponing it.


Yeah but a civilization not bothering to escape the death of its home planet vs. lasting until heat death is a time scale difference equivalent to a newborn that goes on a hunger strike because it decided on day farking one of its life that "there is no such thing as escaping death, only postponing it".  That's giving up a bit on the early side.
 
2013-02-20 10:54:23 AM

dragonchild: LoneWolf343: There is no such thing as escaping extinction, only postponing it.

Yeah but a civilization not bothering to escape the death of its home planet vs. lasting until heat death is a time scale difference equivalent to a newborn that goes on a hunger strike because it decided on day farking one of its life that "there is no such thing as escaping death, only postponing it".  That's giving up a bit on the early side.


Really? You couldn't possibly anticipate any acceptable middle ground between "live forever" and "kill yourself now?"
 
2013-02-21 01:05:21 AM
What's important is that we existed, and that we tried to learn.

We have the middle ground, and it's HERE, right NOW.

Let's not waste it by throwing our hands up from a misplaced and erroneous sense of futility.

We, as a species, potentially have billions of years yet ahead of us.

Let's try to live up to that as individuals, despite our comparatively tiny lifespans.
 
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