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(Tech News World)   Cellular phone markets are destined to redefine the geopolitics of country of Africa, or why you should learn to love the Android   (technewsworld.com) divider line 33
    More: Unlikely, Android, TNW, Samsung Galaxy S, South Africa, Nokia  
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1887 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Feb 2013 at 10:28 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-18 10:36:16 AM
I'll come back when that headline makes more sense.
 
2013-02-18 10:36:21 AM
I already got ahead of the curve on this and started appreciating the Toyota Hilux

www.pharside.co.uk
 
2013-02-18 10:38:51 AM
I'm glad to read that Africa finally consolidated into one country.

Behold the power of Android!
 
2013-02-18 10:38:52 AM
Hello this is Prince Akiinawri of Nigeria.  I need help in sending a consignment of $40,000,000 US dollars to United States.  Will you help me?
Message sent from Android Near Lagos, Nigeria
 
2013-02-18 10:44:56 AM
www.techweez.com

Don't forget Nokia. The Asha phone does really well with a lot of these emerging markets.
 
2013-02-18 11:01:51 AM
I attended a symposium put on by the Marconi foundation in 2009 about telecommunications in Africa, this isn't a recent development.  One of big things discussed was how integral smartphones are in the economy, farmers can reach out to village markets before loading their trucks and shop for the best prices they could receive.  They don't have the infrastructure to support a large computer/internet community in many African countries, they can however slap down some cell towers and crank the wattage up as high as they can (wouldn't want to live near one).  Not having a phone that can text is like not having a tractor for many of these farmers.
 
2013-02-18 11:07:04 AM
Ya know, I personally think there is great potential in non-arab africa for amazing growth over the next 50 years, assuming we have the will to stop China from turning it into their 'china'. and you know, the massive failures of their local governments, and dipshiaty tribalist strife.
 
2013-02-18 11:12:52 AM
In recent weeks, Africa, of all places, has been a hotbed for smartphone news.

Dude, if you're going to write for TechNewsNow than you might want to be a bit more now.   In a lot of ways Africa is way ahead of the US on smartphone app penetration.  Because of the lack of physical and economic infrastructure, mobile phones are more valuable than they are in the US.

For example:

media.economist.com
 
2013-02-18 11:24:54 AM

SuperT: Ya know, I personally think there is great potential in non-arab africa for amazing growth over the next 50 years, assuming we have the will to stop China from turning it into their 'china'. and you know, the massive failures of their local governments, and dipshiaty tribalist strife.


There has been a lot of amazing growth in non-arab africa in the last 20 years, it just widely varies from region to region. The biggest problem I see is avoiding large corporations from treating it as a regulation free zone where they can do all the crappy shiat they did in the past in more developed countries which are now regulated more tightly.
 
2013-02-18 11:56:19 AM
.... geopolitics of country of Africa

On which continent is that country located?

/the
 
2013-02-18 11:57:50 AM

Mad_Radhu: [www.techweez.com image 600x392]

Don't forget Nokia. The Asha phone does really well with a lot of these emerging markets.


50 years from now they'll still be emerging, unless of course we've found a more fitting description.
 
2013-02-18 12:09:21 PM
DNRTFA, but consider these two facts, the headline makes perfect sense:
1. The borders of Africa's countries are, in a large part, arbitrary. They were drawn by mostly British and French officials interested in making some money in the 19th and early 20th centuries. They rarely match up very well with traditional ethnic/linguistic/social territories (much like Eastern Europe after World War I)

2. The way people actually communicate and do business will always steamroll over & ignore stupid arbitrary barriers to business. Ergo mobile communications show what business and social patterns were going on in Africa, regardless of "national" borders for decades.
 
2013-02-18 12:18:04 PM
img72.imageshack.us
 
2013-02-18 12:31:39 PM
My co-worker from the Democratic Republic of the Congo sent refurbished smartphones to his family members in Kasai-Occidental, a remote part of the country.They get to send messages in their native language by typing it with Roman alphabets. This is rather cool as those rural folks don't like to use French in formal situations and wouldn't have to deal with the authorities face-to-face. Sub-Saharan Africa will eventually become very sustainable thanks to communication technology and appropriate technology.
 
2013-02-18 12:40:31 PM
First you came for Pluto and downgraded it to a "dwarf planet." Now you're downgrading Africa to a country instead of a continent?
 
2013-02-18 12:46:34 PM

DemDave: First you came for Pluto and downgraded it to a "dwarf planet." Now you're downgrading Africa to a country instead of a continent?


Already been done by this guy.

o.onionstatic.com

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8Q10g_Mov4
 
2013-02-18 01:24:19 PM
Headling of TFA: "Africa Is Not a Country - It's a Collection of Smartphone Markets"

Actually it's a farking continent...
 
2013-02-18 01:28:57 PM

Rapmaster2000: Dude, if you're going to write for TechNewsNow than you might want to be a bit more now.   In a lot of ways Africa is way ahead of the US on smartphone app penetration.  Because of the lack of physical and economic infrastructure, mobile phones are more valuable than they are in the US.

For example


Yeah, that article wasn't news at all---that author is way behind the times.  It is interesting to read about how much better use of cellular networks Africans are making compared to us.  Mobile services there don't have traditional land-line based companies to compete with, since the cell towers are the first solid communication infrastructure in much of the continent.

/and yes, it's a continent not a country
 
2013-02-18 01:36:02 PM

ArcadianRefugee: I'll come back when that headline makes more sense.


Hey, it's already redefined the geography of Africa.

Now all it has to do is redefine the politics of Africa and job well done!
 
2013-02-18 01:39:13 PM
www.pharside.co.uk

The recipe for the world's best egg salad remains a closely-
 guarded secret despite Moskowitz's best efforts in the 1960s and 70s.
 
2013-02-18 01:41:57 PM
o.onionstatic.com

Downgraded from a dwarf planet to a
TV game show host
 
2013-02-18 01:51:28 PM
HMS_Blinkin:

Rapmaster2000: Dude, if you're going to write for TechNewsNow than you might want to be a bit more now. In a lot of ways Africa is way ahead of the US on smartphone app penetration. Because of the lack of physical and economic infrastructure, mobile phones are more valuable than they are in the US.

For example

Yeah, that article wasn't news at all---that author is way behind the times. It is interesting to read about how much better use of cellular networks Africans are making compared to us. Mobile services there don't have traditional land-line based companies to compete with, since the cell towers are the first solid communication infrastructure in much of the continent.


It's the same in rural Asia. They never had an RTCA and REA program to hook everyone up with copper lines, but you can throw one tower up that covers X square miles a lot cheaper than you can run copper to every village. EVERYONE has a cell phone there.

CS,B:

In the late 80's I was standing in line at the nicest hotel in El Minya, Egypt at 7:00am waiting for the *one* international line that you could get without making an appointment with the post office so I could call my G/F. I struck up a conversation with the westerner ahead of me in line... He had just gotten a home computer and I'm a geek, so we had lots to talk about.

Turns out the guy was Boeing's VP of Sales for the Middle East. And the guy had to wait for a copper line to the rest of the world. We traded business cards, his was much cooler than mine because it was Arabic on one side.

Anyway. Contrast that with the fact that my tour guide in Myanmar had Angry Birds on her phone.
 
2013-02-18 02:04:23 PM
Cellphones are revolutionizing development in many countries--they reach out and touch everything we think, say and do.

It can bring banking services, cash-transfers, remittances from workers in other countries, and many other services to places without infrastructure of any sort. The phones can be used for many medical, scientific, political, and security purposes as well. If there's an app for it, it can be brought to the world's poor quickly and at low cost.

I remember seeing a wonderful picture of an African woman holding a fake cellphone. The thing which delighted me was that the fake was not a piece of plastic junk:  it was carved out of stone. This represents perfectly the strange, weird, wild and wonderful ways that technology affects culture and economies when it is introduced from outside.

You can be sure that if cellphones had been introduced into the stone age, people would have taken to them like flies to warm butter.

Another picture I love shows a Papua-New Guinean tribesman in his traditional costume (scanty) looked at a wall of televisions. Stone age, meet the Flintstones, a stone-age modern family.

There are many countries which have better internet connections and cellphone prices than us tech serfs in North America. A tabla rasa can be a major advantage when adopting new technology or building an economy. You don't have to junk the old stuff to replace it with new stuff. But it takes a certain amount of cultural and economic sophistication to do this quickly and successfully. There's more than one kind of capital involved. You need money, of course, but you also need intellectual, cultural, and socio-political capital. Former democracies and war-ruined advanced economies are a lot easier to rebuild than they are to create ex nihilo.

But seriously, there are a lot of street people with cellphones and laptops and I would not be the least bit surprised if quite a few of them are more sophisticated users of social media and other new tech than I am, simply because they were born into the arms of new tech, without the habits and inhibitions of the educated and the literate.

Interestingly, the scholars that I studied back in the 1970s and 1980s were already thinking in terms of hypertextuality to which much of the web has yet to catch up. The idea of massive interconnectedness some how got invented and explored to a surprising degree before any of the deep and forward thinkers got their hands on the most primitive models of cellphones and home computers. I suspect that there was some interplay between science fiction and science fact before any of these products were commercially possible, let alone available.

Mind you, the idea of the "web" as a "world mind" was invented by H.G. Wells. Yes, the same H.G. Wells who wrote The Time Machine and War of the Worlds. Such is the flexibility of the human mind that you can walk into a new civilization without going through any of the intermediate steps between your present world and the future.

An Ancient Greek citizen might be better adapted to our current politics, economics, and culture than your parents are. Or not. But you can be sure it wouldn't take them long to be yapping away with Aristotle over the web if they got the chance. Probably not THE Aristotle. Aristotle the olive seller.
 
2013-02-18 02:12:46 PM
brantgoose:

The Machine Stops, if you haven't already read it.
 
2013-02-18 02:21:34 PM
I grew up in the country when party lines were still common. You listened when the phone rang for "your ring", which was a simple code of long and short rings, such as short-long-short or long-long or whatever.

Of course, everybody on the party line could pick up the phone and answer it or listen end as quietly as they could. Think about that. Saves a heck of a lot of time getting the gossip out. Every party line had at least one snoop.

You could generally hear the snoop come on the line, and you would almost certainly know who it was. So you could play all sort of head games with them. Forget Angry Birds, this was a lot more fun.

Also, if they knew you were out, your neighbors could answer the phone for you and take messages, or tell the caller where to find you, or just chat and catch up on the news before you get it yourself.

Think about how much money the phone companies were losing! The rural customers were getting all of this for free! Also, the companies were being forced to supply phone service in places where it wasn't economical because the government and others believed it was a public good that should be provided outside of cities.

Hey, boot-strapy red staters! How do like dem little green apples? You wouldn't even exist if you weren't subsidized up to your ears. You would not have the telephone, let alone radio, TV, roads, bridges, and a lot of other crap you can't pay for!

But I digress. Sort of. The truth is, that things never change quite so radically as you think they do. The old party lines could provide many of the "services" that you pay extra for today, for free. Need the weather? Call somebody and ask them what the weather is doing.

In the case of my parents, they could call a town one hour due weather-wards and get a one hour forecast because whatever it is doing over in Maine it will be doing where my parents live in one hour. Handy if you want to know whether you should bring the sheets in and put them in the drier.
 
2013-02-18 02:46:03 PM
brantgoose:

I remember seeing a wonderful picture of an African woman holding a fake cellphone. The thing which delighted me was that the fake was not a piece of plastic junk: it was carved out of stone. This represents perfectly the strange, weird, wild and wonderful ways that technology affects culture and economies when it is introduced from outside.

Ever watched a 5-year old confronted with an array of buttons from a TV or entertainment center?

"Push buttons, things happen. Exciting things!" There's a reward-circuit thing going on there. There's a deep human need there...
 
2013-02-18 02:53:59 PM

Mad_Radhu: [www.techweez.com image 600x392]

Don't forget Nokia. The Asha phone does really well with a lot of these emerging markets.


And the L620 coming
 
2013-02-18 03:45:08 PM
How will they read the screen when it's covered with flies?
 
2013-02-18 04:56:37 PM

Giozef: Headling of TFA: "Africa Is Not a Country - It's a Collection of Smartphone Markets"

Actually it's a farking continent...


Came here to say this... thanks
 
2013-02-18 07:51:17 PM

12349876: DemDave: First you came for Pluto and downgraded it to a "dwarf planet." Now you're downgrading Africa to a country instead of a continent?

Already been done by this guy.

[o.onionstatic.com image 250x273]

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A8Q10g_Mov4


I miss Whose Line.
 
2013-02-18 07:58:11 PM
Jebus, how did humanity ever survive before the invention of the farking Smartphone?
 
2013-02-18 08:08:40 PM
www.insightsquared.com
 
2013-02-18 08:59:34 PM

Mad_Radhu: [www.techweez.com image 600x392]

Don't forget Nokia. The Asha phone does really well with a lot of these emerging markets.


Blackberry has over 60% market share in Nigeria, which is about 225,000 phones per quarter.
 
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