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(NBC News)   Chimpanzees found to have memories which are far better than humans. Scientists surmise that it's probably because they don't have a dozen assorted PINs and passwords to remember   (nbcnews.com) divider line 25
    More: Interesting, chimps, short-term memory, working memory, Kyoto University, scientists  
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711 clicks; posted to Geek » on 18 Feb 2013 at 9:39 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



25 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-02-18 02:39:01 AM  
i212.photobucket.com

There's your problem.
 
2013-02-18 02:56:12 AM  
Not only is my short-term memory worse than a chimpanzee, but so is my short-term memory.
 
2013-02-18 08:46:25 AM  
What I want to know is if Chimps can get the walking dead virus.
 
2013-02-18 09:25:49 AM  
Especially when your password MUST conform to the following:

* be exactly 10 digits
* begin and end in a number
* contain at least one uppercase letter, one lowercase letter, one number and one special character
* the only special characters allowed are @$%
* contain no words found in any dictionary
* the special character MUST be in the 3rd, 4th, 5th, or 7th position
* you cannot use any letter, number, or character twice. This includes two letters in the same case
* you cannot use any numerical arrangement that represents any date, address, phone number, logo, or other common numeric string
* you cannot use more than two consecutive letters of the alphabet or consecutive numbers
* you cannot use common password structures like 'ab12cd34...' etc
* you cannot use any character that was used in any of your previous 8 passwords
* you cannot use any of your previous 25 passwords
* passwords MUST be changed every 7 days
* writing down or sharing your password is a terminable offense, no warnings
* you have 2 attempts to get your password correct, or you will be locked out of the system
* more than 2 lockouts in a 30 day period will result in a write-up; 2 write-ups in 12 months will result in termination
* due to security requirements, passwords cannot be saved on the system

Enjoy your day here at GiantRoboCorps!

Oblig:
 
2013-02-18 09:32:13 AM  

whistleridge: Especially when your password MUST conform to the following:

* be exactly 10 digits
* begin and end in a number
* contain at least one uppercase letter, one lowercase letter, one number and one special character
* the only special characters allowed are @$%
* contain no words found in any dictionary
* the special character MUST be in the 3rd, 4th, 5th, or 7th position
* you cannot use any letter, number, or character twice. This includes two letters in the same case
* you cannot use any numerical arrangement that represents any date, address, phone number, logo, or other common numeric string
* you cannot use more than two consecutive letters of the alphabet or consecutive numbers
* you cannot use common password structures like 'ab12cd34...' etc
* you cannot use any character that was used in any of your previous 8 passwords
* you cannot use any of your previous 25 passwords
* passwords MUST be changed every 7 days
* writing down or sharing your password is a terminable offense, no warnings
* you have 2 attempts to get your password correct, or you will be locked out of the system
* more than 2 lockouts in a 30 day period will result in a write-up; 2 write-ups in 12 months will result in termination
* due to security requirements, passwords cannot be saved on the system

Enjoy your day here at GiantRoboCorps!

Oblig:


Holy shiat. I never thought about that.
 
2013-02-18 09:41:06 AM  

doglover: whistleridge: Especially when your password MUST conform to the following:

* be exactly 10 digits
* begin and end in a number
* contain at least one uppercase letter, one lowercase letter, one number and one special character
* the only special characters allowed are @$%
* contain no words found in any dictionary
* the special character MUST be in the 3rd, 4th, 5th, or 7th position
* you cannot use any letter, number, or character twice. This includes two letters in the same case
* you cannot use any numerical arrangement that represents any date, address, phone number, logo, or other common numeric string
* you cannot use more than two consecutive letters of the alphabet or consecutive numbers
* you cannot use common password structures like 'ab12cd34...' etc
* you cannot use any character that was used in any of your previous 8 passwords
* you cannot use any of your previous 25 passwords
* passwords MUST be changed every 7 days
* writing down or sharing your password is a terminable offense, no warnings
* you have 2 attempts to get your password correct, or you will be locked out of the system
* more than 2 lockouts in a 30 day period will result in a write-up; 2 write-ups in 12 months will result in termination
* due to security requirements, passwords cannot be saved on the system

Enjoy your day here at GiantRoboCorps!

Oblig:

Holy shiat. I never thought about that.


I actually had a previous employer with rules almost that dumb. Why they didn't just automatically issue us generated passwords every Monday and be done with it, I never could figure out. It was FAR more work to actually think up that shiat in the first place than it was to remember it. Humans don't do random; we look for patterns and sequences. And that makes it farking HARD to think of that, while a computer can literally do it in .0000043 seconds.
 
2013-02-18 09:43:36 AM  
They don't smoke as much weed, either.
 
2013-02-18 09:46:34 AM  
I've heard the hypothesis before that humans had much better memories prior to written language. The capacity to store knowledge on stone, clay, parchment, or paper allowed us to get away with not having to memorize all things.

I suppose that if illiterate chimps have better memory skills than modern humans, it supports the hypothesis.
 
2013-02-18 10:01:25 AM  

whistleridge: Especially when your password MUST conform to the following:


0b@MAphon3

=Smidge=
/You've already memorized it
//Which is too bad 'cause you'll have to change it next week anyway
 
2013-02-18 10:15:16 AM  
I've been using Evernote to track my various passwords.

The list is now two pages long- and that doesn't include stuff like my home and work passwords which I always have memorized.  It's getting absurd- I need 6 separate ones for health insurance sites, 4 for tax stuff, about 5 more for various bill pay sites...  Of course I duplicate a lot, so if one site gets hacked everything else will be perfectly safe (not), but I just can't even begin to handle having to create specialized passwords for everything.
 
2013-02-18 10:37:46 AM  
Username: poopflinger
Password: banAna1
 
2013-02-18 10:46:03 AM  

cgraves67: I've heard the hypothesis before that humans had much better memories prior to written language. The capacity to store knowledge on stone, clay, parchment, or paper allowed us to get away with not having to memorize all things.

I suppose that if illiterate chimps have better memory skills than modern humans, it supports the hypothesis.


Which cues the other obligatory xkcd
 
2013-02-18 11:06:57 AM  
We have those horrible password rules at my workplace.

It results in our access to our personal files being written on a sticky note and an excel file having the rest.

Secure right?
 
2013-02-18 11:43:29 AM  

Glockenspiel Hero: I've been using Evernote to track my various passwords.

The list is now two pages long- and that doesn't include stuff like my home and work passwords which I always have memorized.  It's getting absurd- I need 6 separate ones for health insurance sites, 4 for tax stuff, about 5 more for various bill pay sites...  Of course I duplicate a lot, so if one site gets hacked everything else will be perfectly safe (not), but I just can't even begin to handle having to create specialized passwords for everything.


In theory, LastPass should be your friend. But my guess is you're not anymore enamoree of the idea of turning over access to a 3rd party program than I am.
 
2013-02-18 12:13:55 PM  
A dozen? I have to keep a database protected with yet another 16 digit gibberish password to store my hundreds of username/passwords that I've accrued over the last 15 years. The whole thing is ridiculous and there has to be a better way.
 
2013-02-18 02:06:22 PM  
correcthorsebatterystaple is my password for everything.
 
2013-02-18 02:12:19 PM  

whistleridge: Glockenspiel Hero: I've been using Evernote to track my various passwords.

The list is now two pages long- and that doesn't include stuff like my home and work passwords which I always have memorized.  It's getting absurd- I need 6 separate ones for health insurance sites, 4 for tax stuff, about 5 more for various bill pay sites...  Of course I duplicate a lot, so if one site gets hacked everything else will be perfectly safe (not), but I just can't even begin to handle having to create specialized passwords for everything.

In theory, LastPass should be your friend. But my guess is you're not anymore enamoree of the idea of turning over access to a 3rd party program than I am.


Evernote is probably no better since I don't know where they store the encryption keys for my password file.  Both of them allow ads in the free versions as well, which opens up all sorts of potential evil

/Maybe I shouldn't worry- they're all variants of 12345678 and PASSWORD
//And my old dog's name
///correcthorsebatterystaple too
////Don't hack me bro.
 
2013-02-18 02:25:36 PM  

JPSimonetti: A dozen? I have to keep a database protected with yet another 16 digit gibberish password to store my hundreds of username/passwords that I've accrued over the last 15 years. The whole thing is ridiculous and there has to be a better way.


The government is slowly working towards a universal RFID card system, where all the databases we have access to will be on the one card, which is kept in a protector so it can't be scanned.

I'm quite looking forward to it.
 
2013-02-18 02:35:09 PM  

Glockenspiel Hero: whistleridge: Glockenspiel Hero: I've been using Evernote to track my various passwords.

The list is now two pages long- and that doesn't include stuff like my home and work passwords which I always have memorized.  It's getting absurd- I need 6 separate ones for health insurance sites, 4 for tax stuff, about 5 more for various bill pay sites...  Of course I duplicate a lot, so if one site gets hacked everything else will be perfectly safe (not), but I just can't even begin to handle having to create specialized passwords for everything.

In theory, LastPass should be your friend. But my guess is you're not anymore enamoree of the idea of turning over access to a 3rd party program than I am.

Evernote is probably no better since I don't know where they store the encryption keys for my password file.  Both of them allow ads in the free versions as well, which opens up all sorts of potential evil

/Maybe I shouldn't worry- they're all variants of 12345678 and PASSWORD
//And my old dog's name
///correcthorsebatterystaple too
////Don't hack me bro.


I use old cheat codes. Someday, some hacker in the Phillippines is going to try 'modify the phase variance' on my bank account and get literally tens of dollars as their rewards.
 
2013-02-18 03:51:13 PM  
"The Magical Number Seven, Plus or Minus Two: Some Limits on Our Capacity for Processing Information"[2] is one of the most highly cited papers in psychology.[3][4][5] It was published in 1956 by the cognitive psychologist George A. Miller of Princeton University's Department of Psychology in Psychological Review. It is often interpreted to argue that the number of objects an average human can hold in working memory is 7 ± 2. This is frequently referred to as Miller's Law.

So, it seems that chimps able to memorize the order and location of 9 numbers have a working memory size that fits within the human parameters.

If humans can't do the chimp task then certain features of it are probably more "ecologically valid": (correspond to real life situations chimps have to deal with in the wild) for chimps than for humans. Humans are probably a lot better at remembering human speech sounds such as meaningless syllables than chimps because that is not something chimps naturally do while humans have to do that when learning a new word.
 
2013-02-18 04:05:43 PM  

Smackledorfer: JPSimonetti: A dozen? I have to keep a database protected with yet another 16 digit gibberish password to store my hundreds of username/passwords that I've accrued over the last 15 years. The whole thing is ridiculous and there has to be a better way.

The government is slowly working towards a universal RFID card system, where all the databases we have access to will be on the one card, which is kept in a protector so it can't be scanned.

I'm quite looking forward to it.


"It was an Ident-i-Eeze, and was a very naughty and silly thing for Harl to have lying around in his wallet, though it was perfectly understandable. There were so many different ways in which you were required to provide absolute proof of your identity these days that life could easily become extremely tiresome just from that factor alone, never mind the deeper existential problems of trying to function as a coherent consciousness in an epistemologically ambiguous physical universe. Just look at cash point machines, for instance. Queues of people standing around waiting to have their fingerprints read, their retinas scanned, bits of skin scraped from the nape of the neck and undergoing instant (or nearly instant --- a good six or seven seconds in tedious reality) genetic analysis, then having to answer trick questions about members of their family they didn't even remember they had, and about their recorded preferences for tablecloth colours. And that was just to get a bit of spare cash for the weekend. If you were trying to raise a loan for a jetcar, sign a missile treaty or pay an entire restaurant bill things could get really trying.

Hence the Ident-i-Eeze. This encoded every single piece of information about you, your body and your life into one all- purpose machine-readable card that you could then carry around in your wallet, and therefore represented technology's greatest triumph to date over both itself and plain common sense. "
- Douglas Adams, Mostly Harmless
 
2013-02-18 04:10:39 PM  
This incredible short-term (or "working") memory

Short-term memory is not working memory.
 
2013-02-18 04:19:06 PM  
Volumes from the Library of Animal Memories:

Memoirs of Cheetah the Chimp:  17  Bananas I have known in the last 30 minutes

Memoirs of Thundra the Elephant: Hunters I Am Going to Sit on if I see them Again, Volume 1 (1933-1997)

Memoirs of Tarzan the Ape Man:   Me, Tarzan, Me No Remember You, Pretty Lady

Memoirs of Gill the Goldfish: That Castle Looks Familiar, That Castle Looks Familiar ....

Memoirs of Stanley the Tortoise: There used to be a tree right there sixty years ago. I dropped an acorn 260 years ago and it rolled into a crack on that very spot. I wonder if it is still there.

Memoirs of Mabel the Mayfly:  It's been a Good Day.

Memoirs of Claude Backdraft the Camel: 1,137 Proofs of the Value of Pi, or, How I spent my Years on the Really, Really Wide Beach
 
2013-02-18 04:46:21 PM  

JPSimonetti: Smackledorfer: JPSimonetti: A dozen? I have to keep a database protected with yet another 16 digit gibberish password to store my hundreds of username/passwords that I've accrued over the last 15 years. The whole thing is ridiculous and there has to be a better way.

The government is slowly working towards a universal RFID card system, where all the databases we have access to will be on the one card, which is kept in a protector so it can't be scanned.

I'm quite looking forward to it.

"It was an Ident-i-Eeze, and was a very naughty and silly thing for Harl to have lying around in his wallet, though it was perfectly understandable. There were so many different ways in which you were required to provide absolute proof of your identity these days that life could easily become extremely tiresome just from that factor alone, never mind the deeper existential problems of trying to function as a coherent consciousness in an epistemologically ambiguous physical universe. Just look at cash point machines, for instance. Queues of people standing around waiting to have their fingerprints read, their retinas scanned, bits of skin scraped from the nape of the neck and undergoing instant (or nearly instant --- a good six or seven seconds in tedious reality) genetic analysis, then having to answer trick questions about members of their family they didn't even remember they had, and about their recorded preferences for tablecloth colours. And that was just to get a bit of spare cash for the weekend. If you were trying to raise a loan for a jetcar, sign a missile treaty or pay an entire restaurant bill things could get really trying.

Hence the Ident-i-Eeze. This encoded every single piece of information about you, your body and your life into one all- purpose machine-readable card that you could then carry around in your wallet, and therefore represented technology's greatest triumph to date over both itself and plain common sense. "
- Douglas Adams, Mostly Harmless


Douglas Adams is great and I enjoy over-the-top scifi.  I hope you aren't quoting it as though the rfid card I referred to takes down a slippery slope to the Ident-i-Eeze.
 
2013-02-18 06:36:30 PM  
magnificentvista.files.wordpress.comwww.cse.buffalo.edu
 
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