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(The Atlantic)   The worst cities for single, college-educated women to find a decent man. The worst place? Sarasota, Florida, though you'd think anyone with an advanced degree would know well to stay well away from that state   (theatlantic.com) divider line 56
    More: PSA, Sarasota, bachelor's degrees  
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5801 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Feb 2013 at 9:25 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-17 09:27:49 PM
I know where I'm gonna open up a "Cats n' Things" franchise...
 
2013-02-17 09:29:29 PM
"Are you a young, college-educated woman? Are you looking to settle down one day with a young, college-educated man? A word of advice: Stay away from Sarasota, Florida."

i16.photobucket.com
 
2013-02-17 09:30:16 PM
What about a Master's degree in Gator Rasslin?
 
2013-02-17 09:31:19 PM
I'd stay a thousand miles from Florida if I was looking for anything with less than three legs to marry, quite honestly.
 
2013-02-17 09:32:58 PM

Gyrfalcon: I'd stay a thousand miles from Florida if I was looking for anything with less than three legs to marry, quite honestly.


Hey now. I think my third leg is quite fetching, thank you very much.
 
2013-02-17 09:35:09 PM
On the flip side, as a male this list serves as a "best places to get laid" showcase.
 
2013-02-17 09:36:29 PM
It's not exactly a great place for single guys either. Or at least it wasn't when I grew up there.

I mean, this is the town that brought us Pee Wee wanking in a porno theater, that was behind the pool hall me and my buddies played video games and shot pool at.

/csb
 
2013-02-17 09:37:02 PM
Sarasota? go for the early bird special and bring a walker with you...works every time
 
2013-02-17 09:37:28 PM

Shaggy_C: On the flip side, as a male this list serves as a "best places to get laid" showcase.


Not necessarily:

1. Be attractive
2. Don't be unattractive
 
2013-02-17 09:38:30 PM
So what's with the Mormons?  Three Utah cities and Boise are in the Top 12.  Do Mormon women get married younger  or are they less likely to get a college education?  Or are Mormon men more likely to get a college education than elsewhere?
 
2013-02-17 09:39:07 PM
So you are saying that Sarasota, Florida is the best place for blue-collar men to find one of them there decent college educated women. Yeehaw!
 
2013-02-17 09:42:36 PM

rugman11: So what's with the Mormons?  Three Utah cities and Boise are in the Top 12.  Do Mormon women get married younger  or are they less likely to get a college education?  Or are Mormon men more likely to get a college education than elsewhere?


A combo of all of the above. Their women are supposed to be 50s style homemakers, and the men powerful, gentile smiting, jesus preaching, business executives.
 
2013-02-17 09:45:20 PM
Sarasota is home to a large number of retired circus people. So it has that going for it.
 
2013-02-17 09:46:21 PM
I'm a gal with a degree, happily paired with high school-educated guy.

Plenty off morons manage to get that piece of paper, and learning is something that smart, curious people pursue regardless of institutional setting.
 
2013-02-17 09:50:14 PM

Polyhazard: I'm a gal with a degree, happily paired with high school-educated guy.

Plenty off morons manage to get that piece of paper, and learning is something that smart, curious people pursue regardless of institutional setting.


Plenty on morons do too.

/sorry, couldn't resist
 
2013-02-17 09:58:00 PM

Boojum2k: Polyhazard: I'm a gal with a degree, happily paired with high school-educated guy.

Plenty off morons manage to get that piece of paper, and learning is something that smart, curious people pursue regardless of institutional setting.

Plenty on morons do too.

/sorry, couldn't resist


Argh... shiat like that always happens when I'm talking about teh smarts...
 
2013-02-17 10:02:25 PM
Kabul isnt #1? wtf?
 
2013-02-17 10:03:50 PM
What about a list for the best cities for a woman to meet an indecent man?
 
2013-02-17 10:06:15 PM
I'm surprised at this:
cdn.theatlantic.com

I would have assumed that at least over 50% of the population would have a bachelor's degree before 30.
 
2013-02-17 10:12:31 PM

thorsmistress: Sarasota is home to a large number of retired circus people. So it has that going for it.


This is true. One of my best friends parents owned a circus, it was pretty sweet when they would have a party and break out the bouncy house.
 
2013-02-17 10:23:45 PM
As a Sarasotan, and a reasonably attractive college-educated professional male, I can safely say that the single women in Sarasota are mainly interested wanna-be yuppie douchebags and elderly widowers.

Which is why I like to go down to Bradenton to pick up gash, they're easily impressed down there, not like snooty Sarasota women.
 
2013-02-17 10:25:27 PM
I call shenanigans. Simple stats like this one have a poor connection to the actual dating reality of a location. Raw numbers of age appropriate men and women need to be considered. I have lived in at least three regions that are "worse for woman" than Silicon Valley (San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara Man Gap 8.93% rank 2nd best for women)  and never did I see so many guys dating mingers as I did in Silicon Valley. A couple of them were absolute trolls (mean and ugly). I will admit that Durham-Chapel Hill had some lookers though.
 
2013-02-17 10:26:09 PM

rugman11: So what's with the Mormons?  Three Utah cities and Boise are in the Top 12.  Do Mormon women get married younger  or are they less likely to get a college education?  Or are Mormon men more likely to get a college education than elsewhere?


Boise at #9 is no real surprise.  The broads here knock out 3 kids by the mid 20's.  A few years later the guy is tired of the crazy biatch and leaves.  Now she's stuck hating men with 3 kids in a low wage state but with grand visions of a McMansion where she rules the roost and the man eats shiat sandwiches every day.

Dating here was interesting at best, an exercise in WTF at worst.  Then I realized sluts abound and things got better.
 
2013-02-17 10:29:50 PM

Smeggy Smurf: rugman11: So what's with the Mormons?  Three Utah cities and Boise are in the Top 12.  Do Mormon women get married younger  or are they less likely to get a college education?  Or are Mormon men more likely to get a college education than elsewhere?

Boise at #9 is no real surprise.  The broads here knock out 3 kids by the mid 20's.  A few years later the guy is tired of the crazy biatch and leaves.  Now she's stuck hating men with 3 kids in a low wage state but with grand visions of a McMansion where she rules the roost and the man eats shiat sandwiches every day.

Dating here was interesting at best, an exercise in WTF at worst.  Then I realized sluts abound and things got better.


Man, the places you people live sound like they really really suck.
 
2013-02-17 10:31:28 PM
"Cites"?  Really?
 
2013-02-17 10:33:59 PM
Remember Ladies: if you don't marry "up", you've failed as a woman.
 
2013-02-17 10:34:08 PM
Does having a liberal arts degree somehow constitute being smart, or successful?

Someone please explain it to me, because I want to know why a guy without a degree in underwater basket weaving is indecent, or undatable.
 
2013-02-17 10:40:23 PM
most college girls are smart enough to spread their legs for a college boy and get a ring on that finger. the girls in this article are the stupid ones.
 
2013-02-17 10:51:45 PM

TuteTibiImperes: I would have assumed that at least over 50% of the population would have a bachelor's degree before 30.


Out of 942 Census-recognized Metropolitan/Micropolitan areas in the US (-Puerto Rico), there are only 31 places where more than 40% of the population over the age of 25 has at least a Bachelor's degree.  For those keeping track at home, they are:

Los Alamos, NM Micro Area63.9
Boulder, CO Metro Area57.7
Ann Arbor, MI Metro Area51
Ithaca, NY Metro Area49.8
Silverthorne, CO Micro Area49.2
Lawrence, KS Metro Area48.8
Pullman, WA Micro Area48.1
Laramie, WY Micro Area48
Ames, IA Metro Area47.7
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV Metro Area47.5
Corvallis, OR Metro Area47.4
Jackson, WY-ID Micro Area47
Iowa City, IA Metro Area45.4
Bozeman, MT Micro Area45.1
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA Metro Area44.8
Columbia, MO Metro Area44.4
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT Metro Area44
Edwards, CO Micro Area43.9
Moscow, ID Micro Area43.7
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, CA Metro Area43.7
Durham-Chapel Hill, NC Metro Area43.3
Fort Collins-Loveland, CO Metro Area43.1
Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA-NH Metro Area42.6
Charlottesville, VA Metro Area42.6
Raleigh-Cary, NC Metro Area41.9
Madison, WI Metro Area41.7
Starkville, MS Micro Area41.7
Vermillion, SD Micro Area41.7
Bloomington-Normal, IL Metro Area41.1
Durango, CO Micro Area41
Barnstable Town, MA Metro Area40.5
 
2013-02-17 11:03:23 PM

Lawnchair: TuteTibiImperes: I would have assumed that at least over 50% of the population would have a bachelor's degree before 30.

Out of 942 Census-recognized Metropolitan/Micropolitan areas in the US (-Puerto Rico), there are only 31 places where more than 40% of the population over the age of 25 has at least a Bachelor's degree.  For those keeping track at home, they are:


This is mostly small(ish) cities with large universities

Boulder, CO Metro Area57.7 - University of Colorado
Ann Arbor, MI Metro Area51 - University of Michigan
Ithaca, NY Metro Area49.8 - Cornell University
Lawrence, KS Metro Area48.8 - University of Kansas
Pullman, WA Micro Area48.1 - Washington State University
Laramie, WY Micro Area48 - University of Wyoming
Ames, IA Metro Area47.7 - Iowa State University
Corvallis, OR Metro Area47.4 - Oregon State University
Iowa City, IA Metro Area45.4 - University of Iowa
Bozeman, MT Micro Area45.1 - Montana State University
Columbia, MO Metro Area44.4 - University of Missouri
Moscow, ID Micro Area43.7 - University of Idaho
Durham-Chapel Hill, NC Metro Area43.3 - University of North Carolina/Duke University
Fort Collins-Loveland, CO Metro Area43.1 - Colorado State University
Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA-NH Metro Area42.6 - Harvard University/Boston College/Boston University
Charlottesville, VA Metro Area42.6 - Virginia Polytechnic Institute
Raleigh-Cary, NC Metro Area41.9 - North Carolina State University
Madison, WI Metro Area41.7 - University of Wisconsin
Starkville, MS Micro Area41.7 - Mississippi State University
Vermillion, SD Micro Area41.7 - University of South Dakota
Bloomington-Normal, IL Metro Area41.1 - Illinois State University
 
2013-02-17 11:05:49 PM

Lawnchair: San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA Metro Area44.8


Silicon Valley is only 45%?

Legit question: How does a janitor make enough money to afford a $1600/month 1 BR?  Because that's the low end right now.
 
2013-02-17 11:07:44 PM
Los Alamos, NM Micro Area63.9
Boulder, CO Metro Area57.7
Ann Arbor, MI Metro Area51
Ithaca, NY Metro Area49.8
Silverthorne, CO Micro Area49.2
Lawrence, KS Metro Area48.8
Pullman, WA Micro Area48.1
Laramie, WY Micro Area48
Ames, IA Metro Area47.7
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV Metro Area47.5
Corvallis, OR Metro Area47.4
Jackson, WY-ID Micro Area47
Iowa City, IA Metro Area45.4
Bozeman, MT Micro Area45.1
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA Metro Area44.8
Columbia, MO Metro Area44.4
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT Metro Area44
Edwards, CO Micro Area43.9
Moscow, ID Micro Area43.7
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, CA Metro Area43.7
Durham-Chapel Hill, NC Metro Area43.3
Fort Collins-Loveland, CO Metro Area43.1
Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA-NH Metro Area42.6
Charlottesville, VA Metro Area42.6
Raleigh-Cary, NC Metro Area41.9
Madison, WI Metro Area41.7
Starkville, MS Micro Area41.7
Vermillion, SD Micro Area41.7
Bloomington-Normal, IL Metro Area41.1
Durango, CO Micro Area41
Barnstable Town, MA Metro Area40.5

The bolded are all college towns or cities that house one or more major universities.  I just assumed that the US overall, and especially this generation, was more educated than it is.
 
2013-02-17 11:16:11 PM

Lawnchair: TuteTibiImperes: I would have assumed that at least over 50% of the population would have a bachelor's degree before 30.

Out of 942 Census-recognized Metropolitan/Micropolitan areas in the US (-Puerto Rico), there are only 31 places where more than 40% of the population over the age of 25 has at least a Bachelor's degree.  For those keeping track at home, they are:

Los Alamos, NM Micro Area63.9
Boulder, CO Metro Area57.7
Ann Arbor, MI Metro Area51
Ithaca, NY Metro Area49.8
Silverthorne, CO Micro Area49.2
Lawrence, KS Metro Area48.8
Pullman, WA Micro Area48.1
Laramie, WY Micro Area48
Ames, IA Metro Area47.7
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV Metro Area47.5
Corvallis, OR Metro Area47.4
Jackson, WY-ID Micro Area47
Iowa City, IA Metro Area45.4
Bozeman, MT Micro Area45.1
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA Metro Area44.8
Columbia, MO Metro Area44.4
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT Metro Area44
Edwards, CO Micro Area43.9
Moscow, ID Micro Area43.7
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, CA Metro Area43.7
Durham-Chapel Hill, NC Metro Area43.3
Fort Collins-Loveland, CO Metro Area43.1
Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA-NH Metro Area42.6
Charlottesville, VA Metro Area42.6
Raleigh-Cary, NC Metro Area41.9
Madison, WI Metro Area41.7
Starkville, MS Micro Area41.7
Vermillion, SD Micro Area41.7
Bloomington-Normal, IL Metro Area41.1
Durango, CO Micro Area41
Barnstable Town, MA Metro Area40.5


Look at all those college towns in flyover country and almost complete lack of large population centers.

Off-topic, am I the only one that has trouble with the Atlantic's mobile site? I can scroll fine while the page is loading, but when it hits 100%, I can't scroll at all.
 
2013-02-17 11:20:11 PM

rugman11: This is mostly small(ish) cities with large universities


Yep. The point is, if you think half the population has a college degree, you're living in a bubble of all highly-educated folks.  It's 20-35% in major cities, and 15-25% in most smaller areas.  It's also not going to get to get to 50% of the population without demeaning any meaning left in the term "college degree".  It's not 50% in Germany, Japan, or anywhere else in the world.
 
2013-02-17 11:20:40 PM

TuteTibiImperes: I'm surprised at this:
[cdn.theatlantic.com image 495x349]

I would have assumed that at least over 50% of the population would have a bachelor's degree before 30.


I wonder why Asians are left out. Probably didn't fit the view point that the chart was trying to make.
 
2013-02-17 11:24:44 PM

Lawnchair: rugman11: This is mostly small(ish) cities with large universities

Yep. The point is, if you think half the population has a college degree, you're living in a bubble of all highly-educated folks.  It's 20-35% in major cities, and 15-25% in most smaller areas.  It's also not going to get to get to 50% of the population without demeaning any meaning left in the term "college degree".  It's not 50% in Germany, Japan, or anywhere else in the world.


I don't think it's a "bubble" issue, just that most people who visit a site like Fark (and especially will comment) are more likely to be educated and to surround themselves with educated people.  I can't think of a single friend of mine who doesn't have a Bachelor's degree, but then again, most of my friends are either friends from college or people I (or my wife) work with.  And both of our workplaces are staffed largely (or exclusively) with college-educated people.
 
2013-02-17 11:32:54 PM

rugman11: Lawnchair: rugman11: This is mostly small(ish) cities with large universities

Yep. The point is, if you think half the population has a college degree, you're living in a bubble of all highly-educated folks.  It's 20-35% in major cities, and 15-25% in most smaller areas.  It's also not going to get to get to 50% of the population without demeaning any meaning left in the term "college degree".  It's not 50% in Germany, Japan, or anywhere else in the world.

I don't think it's a "bubble" issue, just that most people who visit a site like Fark (and especially will comment) are more likely to be educated and to surround themselves with educated people.  I can't think of a single friend of mine who doesn't have a Bachelor's degree, but then again, most of my friends are either friends from college or people I (or my wife) work with.  And both of our workplaces are staffed largely (or exclusively) with college-educated people.


Goddammit, I totally just proved your point without realizing it.  I'm drunk.  Just ignore me.
 
2013-02-17 11:40:06 PM

TuteTibiImperes: I'm surprised at this:
[cdn.theatlantic.com image 495x349]

I would have assumed that at least over 50% of the population would have a bachelor's degree before 30.


Why does that surprise you? You saw the results of the last election, right?
 
2013-02-17 11:41:06 PM

rugman11: rugman11: Lawnchair: rugman11: This is mostly small(ish) cities with large universities

Yep. The point is, if you think half the population has a college degree, you're living in a bubble of all highly-educated folks.  It's 20-35% in major cities, and 15-25% in most smaller areas.  It's also not going to get to get to 50% of the population without demeaning any meaning left in the term "college degree".  It's not 50% in Germany, Japan, or anywhere else in the world.

I don't think it's a "bubble" issue, just that most people who visit a site like Fark (and especially will comment) are more likely to be educated and to surround themselves with educated people.  I can't think of a single friend of mine who doesn't have a Bachelor's degree, but then again, most of my friends are either friends from college or people I (or my wife) work with.  And both of our workplaces are staffed largely (or exclusively) with college-educated people.

Goddammit, I totally just proved your point without realizing it.  I'm drunk.  Just ignore me.


So if less than half of all HS graduates are going to go to college (or maybe just less than half graduate from college) it does make you wonder a bit about the structure of our current education system.  Perhaps we as a society could benefit from an increased emphasis on vo-tech/trade-school options for high-school aged students instead of trying to funnel everyone into a program designed to terminate in a college degree.
 
2013-02-17 11:42:37 PM
I live where you go on vacation. Now how is it that I'm the stupid one?
 
2013-02-17 11:44:54 PM

Gyrfalcon: TuteTibiImperes: I'm surprised at this:
[cdn.theatlantic.com image 495x349]

I would have assumed that at least over 50% of the population would have a bachelor's degree before 30.

Why does that surprise you? You saw the results of the last election, right?


True, I suppose in a more highly educated country Obama would have won in even more of a landslide.

static.happyplace.com
 
2013-02-17 11:45:07 PM
So, many women "find themselves marrying down the educational ladder." Welcome (sincerely) to success, ladies! And welcome to the same dynamics your opposite gender has dealt with for generations. So quit whining. And if you're so educated (which doesn't equal smart) realize that just because a guy doesn't have the same degree as you, doesn't mean they're unsuccessful, or a knuckle-dragging, non-conversational loser.

I suspect that either some sisters need to get over themselves, or they need to fess up to the fact that they're really just shopping for a mommy-hood sponsor.
 
2013-02-17 11:55:28 PM

TuteTibiImperes: So if less than half of all HS graduates are going to go to college (or maybe just less than half graduate from college) it does make you wonder a bit about the structure of our current education system.  Perhaps we as a society could benefit from an increased emphasis on vo-tech/trade-school options for high-school aged students instead of trying to funnel everyone into a program designed to terminate in a college degree.


Reasonable.  Germany and Japan, among others, do substantially more of that than we do.

The biggest issue, from what I can tell, is that proper trade education, done right anyway, is actually decidedly more expensive per-pupil than "butt-in-desk" college-preparatory education.  The latter can be done very, very cheaply.  In Germany (and Japan pre-2003 or so... a lot has fallen off with the long stagnation), a lot of that training was in co-operation with major companies.  US companies don't want to train adults, let alone 16-year-olds. Particularly for jobs the next McKinsey cokehead might outsource tomorrow.  Where job training isn't directly in co-ops, it is often through trade guilds (unions).  Which are also basically dead in the US.

So, we don't have the business structure to offload it on industry.  And it's substantially cheaper to say, "we sat you in a desk for four years, you had the chance to go to college, if you messed it up too bad" than to actually fund job-centered education. So that's what we do.
 
2013-02-18 12:04:18 AM

TuteTibiImperes: Perhaps we as a society could benefit from an increased emphasis on vo-tech/trade-school options for high-school aged students instead of trying to funnel everyone into a program designed to terminate in a college degree.


What we need to do that is fold that stuff back into high school, rather than forcing people to pay for it later. As I understand it, most high schools in the nation used to offer a pretty decent amount of vocational training. You could graduate high school and actually have the skills to work as something like an electrician. Now, we've taken that out of high schools, and forced people to to go to a community college- and pay money- if they want that training.
 
2013-02-18 12:14:26 AM

cptjeff: TuteTibiImperes: Perhaps we as a society could benefit from an increased emphasis on vo-tech/trade-school options for high-school aged students instead of trying to funnel everyone into a program designed to terminate in a college degree.

What we need to do that is fold that stuff back into high school, rather than forcing people to pay for it later. As I understand it, most high schools in the nation used to offer a pretty decent amount of vocational training. You could graduate high school and actually have the skills to work as something like an electrician. Now, we've taken that out of high schools, and forced people to to go to a community college- and pay money- if they want that training.


I don't know if you could BE an electrician, but bringing Vo-Tech/Auto back to our high schools would probably be a good idea.  The problem is that most students are being told that it's college or bust and so many would ignore that possible route as being beneath them or not worth their time.
 
2013-02-18 12:18:52 AM

jdjoker: Lawnchair: TuteTibiImperes: I would have assumed that at least over 50% of the population would have a bachelor's degree before 30.

Out of 942 Census-recognized Metropolitan/Micropolitan areas in the US (-Puerto Rico), there are only 31 places where more than 40% of the population over the age of 25 has at least a Bachelor's degree.  For those keeping track at home, they are:

Los Alamos, NM Micro Area63.9
Boulder, CO Metro Area57.7
Ann Arbor, MI Metro Area51
Ithaca, NY Metro Area49.8
Silverthorne, CO Micro Area49.2
Lawrence, KS Metro Area48.8
Pullman, WA Micro Area48.1
Laramie, WY Micro Area48
Ames, IA Metro Area47.7
Washington-Arlington-Alexandria, DC-VA-MD-WV Metro Area47.5
Corvallis, OR Metro Area47.4
Jackson, WY-ID Micro Area47
Iowa City, IA Metro Area45.4
Bozeman, MT Micro Area45.1
San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, CA Metro Area44.8
Columbia, MO Metro Area44.4
Bridgeport-Stamford-Norwalk, CT Metro Area44
Edwards, CO Micro Area43.9
Moscow, ID Micro Area43.7
San Francisco-Oakland-Fremont, CA Metro Area43.7
Durham-Chapel Hill, NC Metro Area43.3
Fort Collins-Loveland, CO Metro Area43.1
Boston-Cambridge-Quincy, MA-NH Metro Area42.6
Charlottesville, VA Metro Area42.6
Raleigh-Cary, NC Metro Area41.9
Madison, WI Metro Area41.7
Starkville, MS Micro Area41.7
Vermillion, SD Micro Area41.7
Bloomington-Normal, IL Metro Area41.1
Durango, CO Micro Area41
Barnstable Town, MA Metro Area40.5

Look at all those college towns in flyover country and almost complete lack of large population centers.

Off-topic, am I the only one that has trouble with the Atlantic's mobile site? I can scroll fine while the page is loading, but when it hits 100%, I can't scroll at all.


Same here, also on CNN and a few others. Dunno why.
 
2013-02-18 12:44:39 AM

rugman11: cptjeff: TuteTibiImperes: Perhaps we as a society could benefit from an increased emphasis on vo-tech/trade-school options for high-school aged students instead of trying to funnel everyone into a program designed to terminate in a college degree.

What we need to do that is fold that stuff back into high school, rather than forcing people to pay for it later. As I understand it, most high schools in the nation used to offer a pretty decent amount of vocational training. You could graduate high school and actually have the skills to work as something like an electrician. Now, we've taken that out of high schools, and forced people to to go to a community college- and pay money- if they want that training.

I don't know if you could BE an electrician, but bringing Vo-Tech/Auto back to our high schools would probably be a good idea.  The problem is that most students are being told that it's college or bust and so many would ignore that possible route as being beneath them or not worth their time.


I know the school district which I went through had a vocational high school, along with three general-purpose mainstream high schools.  Inside of my own high school there were three tracks - honors, college prep, and general-ed.  I didn't have a lot of interaction with the general-ed students, honors and college-prep shared some classes, but general-ed was sectioned off in a completely different area of the building.  The view amongst my peers at the time was the the vo-tech school was for those who weren't smart enough to handle real HS classes, but that was probably nothing more than silly HS student elitism stemming from ignorance about how things actually work.

Still, you are right in that there is certainly a stigma attached to going into a trade right out of school vs going to college, and it would probably be a tough sell for both parents and the students themselves to push for a technical/trade school education over a college-bound track coming right out of middle school.
 
2013-02-18 01:07:42 AM

thorsmistress: Sarasota is home to a large number of retired circus people. So it has that going for it.


cdn3.hark.com
circus folk, nomads, you know, smell like cabbage, small hands...
 
2013-02-18 01:09:43 AM

andyfromfl: I live where you go on vacation. Now how is it that I'm the stupid one?


I have to agree. They've got to be pretty stupid to keep coming down here to vacation in the middle of summer.
 
2013-02-18 01:33:23 AM
rugman11:
I don't know if you could BE an electrician, but bringing Vo-Tech/Auto back to our high schools would probably be a good idea.  The problem is that most students are being told that it's college or bust and so many would ignore that possible route as being beneath them or not worth their time.

It's not the students that are being told "college or bust" by their schools, they're being told this by potential employers. One of the temp jobs I worked in the past year was converting 2d films to 3d using proprietary and off the shelf software (I'm a graphic artist with two degrees - graphic design and new media). A trained ape could handle the job after about 4 weeks, and be on the production floor in 6. Yet the only people this place hired were... college graduates with bachelor's degrees. For temp jobs. Temp contract jobs with no benefits and no paid days off (like christmas or new years).

They did this not because these college grads could handle these relatively simple jobs better, but because they were greedy. Those diplomas made this employer think they were actually getting a better deal for the measly pay they were offering these desperate people with thousands of dollars in student debt, satisfying their innate greed impulse like a "20% more!!" label on a box of corn flakes in the supermarket. And there were many degreed people lined up to take those jobs because of that debt.

You want to prevent the indoctrination of these kids into a "college at all costs" mindset? Start with the idiot employers who insist that front desk receptionists, clerks and personal assistants have bachelors' degrees.
 
2013-02-18 02:44:05 AM
Heh, my girlfriend lives near the boundaries of a handful of the worst areas in SoCal. Though with any luck she'll be up here in 6 months
 
2013-02-18 04:52:47 AM
I mean it kind of depends. I tend to look skeptically at genY and millennials without a bachelors degree, because anymore, you need a bachelors degree to be as educated as a high school grad 30 years ago.

But that's mostly being 35 and hating the young, I get that it's wrong, but it feels so good.
 
2013-02-18 08:15:50 AM
I live in the oldest state per capita with the lowest percentage of college educated women, so I'm really getting a kick out of these replies.

(Actually, I'm weeping a bit inside knowing that I'm going to die childless and alone, but before I even moved here I had Fark to thank for that)
 
2013-02-18 11:48:41 AM
Moved here 5 years ago and it doesn't take very long to grow to absolutely hate this place.  Sarasota sucks ass.  It's run by a bunch of "get off my lawn" old farts and the clueless middle aged city commissioners who kiss their asses for every vote.  It's farking pathetic here and can't wait to find a new job and move.
 
2013-02-18 01:41:24 PM
North Port and Sarasota aren't really the same at all. I wonder if they meant North Port, but just included Sarasota/Bradenton in the name because no one knows where/what North Port is.
 
2013-02-18 07:22:59 PM

Polyhazard: Boojum2k: Polyhazard: I'm a gal with a degree, happily paired with high school-educated guy.

Plenty off morons manage to get that piece of paper, and learning is something that smart, curious people pursue regardless of institutional setting.

Plenty on morons do too.

/sorry, couldn't resist

Argh... shiat like that always happens when I'm talking about teh smarts...


Well at least you spelled morans right.
 
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