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(Clarion-Ledger)   Man watching Lincoln movie discovers that Mississippi never officially officially ratified a ban on slavery, because Mississippi   (clarionledger.com) divider line 18
    More: Obvious, Mississippi, University of Mississippi Medical Center, two-thirds vote, watch  
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12977 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Feb 2013 at 11:11 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-18 12:29:17 AM
2 votes:

hubiestubert: Rufus Lee King: Good Lord, yet another race-baiting, white-people-are-evil thread on FARK? Amazing

P.S. I grew up in Mississippi. Did any of you? It's not like it's portrayed on "The Simpsons", or whatever. Goddamned racists.Seriously.

Old Son, I grew up in the South. South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana. Few times in each and I love the South. I love the people, I love the culture, the food, and the history, the pride of place, the fishing, the hunting, even the snakes and critters.

But the South if a dichotomy of both pride and gentility laid over a background that has virulent hate and ignorance. It's not just the poor white trash, in Atlanta there are gated communities for primarily black families, and for a reason. One cannot grow up in the South without an appreciation for that history, and some of that history is less than kindly.

When I was in 2nd grade, I was in a place called Whitmire, South Carolina. Logging country, and smack dab in some of the finest timber country in the whole state, owned primarily by my neighbors, who rented their parent's old home to my Grandmother. Not even near at a fair price, they happened to like her because she was upper management at the JP Regal plant down the road. They wanted someone nice to look after the old place. The thing that struck me, and I didn't realize this really until a few years later, despite being in the heart of the South, I don't recall a single black face in the town of Whitmire itself. In the plant, certainly. In the surrounding towns. Not in my school. These were generous, church going folk. Kind, warm, gentle, with always a good word. I walked the streets, and learned to ride my bike there. I went to the drug store to get a cherry phosphate or ice cream. It wasn't until years later that I realized that the town was very much segregated, and not by anything so blatant as "Whites Only" signs, but houses simply didn't go to rent or for sale often. There were certainly black faces at the ch ...


Titty sprinkles.
2013-02-17 11:56:21 PM
2 votes:

Rufus Lee King: Let me reiterate: I grew up in Mississippi and the white population was NOT the problem.


www.diabetesmine.com
2013-02-17 11:53:00 PM
2 votes:

Rufus Lee King: Let me reiterate: I grew up in Mississippi and the white population was NOT the problem.


Well, I don't know about anyone else but that post totes convinced me that Mississippi no longer has a problem with race relations.

/Totes.
2013-02-17 11:20:15 PM
2 votes:

quatchi: Mississippi? Learning?


That would make a good movie title.
2013-02-17 09:59:43 PM
2 votes:
Why repeal a law that was imposed by Northern Carpetbaggers during the Great War of Northern Aggression. The South will Rise again, and once it does these laws will be needed to still be in place.

// But the Civil War was not about slavery, but rather States Rights.
2013-02-18 09:37:07 PM
1 votes:

ciberido: You people are weird.


encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com

/I was just enjoying libations ; )
2013-02-18 01:40:08 AM
1 votes:

austerity101: Aigoo: Slavery is an abomination, and so were the Fugitive Slave Laws (of both 1793 and 1850). But no one here gets to play morally superior except VT, CT, RI, Mass, Michigan, Maine, Kansas and Wisconsin

Wow, New Hampshire has been the weird libertarian bastard of New England for some time, apparently.


New Hampshire still has votes to leave the Union from time to time. It is kinda how they roll.
2013-02-18 01:20:35 AM
1 votes:

hubiestubert: The worst critics of the South, they aren't the folks who have never been, but those who have lived and breathed in these lands, who have red clay baked into their souls, and who understand her; her waters, her forests, her rivers and streams, and loving her, want her to rise above the years and come out better. Freer. Who understand her potential, the depth of her people, and still recognize that there is a long way to go to making her live up to that potential.

Racism isn't alone responsible for the conditions in the South, it is a symptom of a rot deep in the halls of power, and exploited and nursed along, to give folks something to point to as a reason. You can love the South and acknowledge that. You can love a place, and a people, and still have eyes open on her faults and her challenges.


[audienceclapping.gif]

Seriously, well done.

/Dammit, now I want a Mint julep, southern fried steak and grits.
//And I don't even know what grits are.
///They might be illegal in Canada or something, never seen 'em on a menu.
2013-02-18 12:36:47 AM
1 votes:

hubiestubert: Old Son, I grew up in the South. South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana. Few times in each and I love the South. I love the people, I love the culture, the food, and the history, the pride of place, the fishing, the hunting, even the snakes and critters.


"Fascinating" isn't the right word either. I should have said "beautiful". Your post has made me want to visit the South. And I feel a bit bad about the Morgan Freeman joke, but once he's on it's hard to shut him off.
2013-02-18 12:30:57 AM
1 votes:
And it was a fascinating post but by about the third sentence my inner reader flipped to the voice of Morgan Freeman, which made the hints that the narrator is white sound very weird.
2013-02-18 12:30:15 AM
1 votes:

hubiestubert: Old Son, I grew up in the South. South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana. Few times in each and I love the South. I love the people, I love the culture, the food, and the history, the pride of place, the fishing, the hunting, even the snakes and critters.


Is it sad that I read this in the voice of Francis Underwood?
2013-02-17 11:57:42 PM
1 votes:
Well since I'm in Alabama all I can say is thank you Mississippi ; )
2013-02-17 11:53:41 PM
1 votes:

Rufus Lee King: Let me reiterate: I grew up in Mississippi and the white population was NOT the problem.


Of course it wasn't.
*pats head*
2013-02-17 11:27:04 PM
1 votes:

Lsherm: DamnYankees: I didn't think any Southern state ratified the 13th amendment, as it was passed without them.

They went back and had ratification votes later.  Mississippi didn't manage to do it in 1995 because paperwork is confusing and shiat.


Reading wasn't fundamental back then.
2013-02-17 11:26:11 PM
1 votes:

hubiestubert: Rusty Cundieff did a bit about this on TV Nation, and he bought the last legal slaves...


It's pretty amazing how the attitude towards slavery expressed by those Mississippians seem pretty much in line with modern America. Maybe it was because they were turned off by a black man owning white slaves, but almost to a man the people were unapologetically against slavery.

There was one guy who wasn't totally against it. There's always one.
2013-02-17 10:50:44 PM
1 votes:

Generation_D: Why repeal a law that was imposed by Northern Carpetbaggers during the Great War of Northern Aggression. The South will Rise again, and once it does these laws will be needed to still be in place.

// But the Civil War was not about slavery, but rather States Rights.


I know that you were being facetious, but I always like to ask about the Fugitive Slave Act when someone does mention the States' Rights thing.
2013-02-17 10:17:56 PM
1 votes:

DamnYankees: I didn't think any Southern state ratified the 13th amendment, as it was passed without them.


They went back and had ratification votes later.  Mississippi didn't manage to do it in 1995 because paperwork is confusing and shiat.
2013-02-17 09:38:30 PM
1 votes:
They're just ahead of the curve for the time when it's revoked and people are auctioned off to cover their debts.
 
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