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(Clarion-Ledger)   Man watching Lincoln movie discovers that Mississippi never officially officially ratified a ban on slavery, because Mississippi   (clarionledger.com) divider line 48
    More: Obvious, Mississippi, University of Mississippi Medical Center, two-thirds vote, watch  
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12972 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Feb 2013 at 11:11 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-18 12:22:59 AM
12 votes:

Rufus Lee King: Good Lord, yet another race-baiting, white-people-are-evil thread on FARK? Amazing

P.S. I grew up in Mississippi. Did any of you? It's not like it's portrayed on "The Simpsons", or whatever. Goddamned racists.Seriously.


Old Son, I grew up in the South. South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana. Few times in each and I love the South. I love the people, I love the culture, the food, and the history, the pride of place, the fishing, the hunting, even the snakes and critters.

But the South if a dichotomy of both pride and gentility laid over a background that has virulent hate and ignorance. It's not just the poor white trash, in Atlanta there are gated communities for primarily black families, and for a reason. One cannot grow up in the South without an appreciation for that history, and some of that history is less than kindly.

When I was in 2nd grade, I was in a place called Whitmire, South Carolina. Logging country, and smack dab in some of the finest timber country in the whole state, owned primarily by my neighbors, who rented their parent's old home to my Grandmother. Not even near at a fair price, they happened to like her because she was upper management at the JP Regal plant down the road. They wanted someone nice to look after the old place. The thing that struck me, and I didn't realize this really until a few years later, despite being in the heart of the South, I don't recall a single black face in the town of Whitmire itself. In the plant, certainly. In the surrounding towns. Not in my school. These were generous, church going folk. Kind, warm, gentle, with always a good word. I walked the streets, and learned to ride my bike there. I went to the drug store to get a cherry phosphate or ice cream. It wasn't until years later that I realized that the town was very much segregated, and not by anything so blatant as "Whites Only" signs, but houses simply didn't go to rent or for sale often. There were certainly black faces at the church when there were interfaith events, but not in our very pleasant Methodist church. Plenty of black faces at the plant, and certainly near, but not in town. These warm and gentle people very kindly excluded a certain element in their town, and it wasn't with hate or sign carrying, just a sort of benign shrug when it came to where folks lived, and that is only part of that dichotomy. I loved that town, I had some of my favorite teachers in those years, but let's not get it f*cked up that there was something going on.

In Louisiana, in DeRidder, and in Monroe, things were a bit more mixed. There was tension at times, but as an Army Brat, I didn't really take notice. I didn't really care, because my father didn't, and while my Grandmother had a few racist bones in her, she warmed over the years as I brought friends home, and she realized that maybe she was wrong. My father, a deadly violent man, was many things: an alcoholic, abusive at times, angry with the world, bitter at times, but he wasn't a racist. Too many things happened to him in Vietnam for him to worry about who pulled him up and out of a mess to worry about what color they were. Too many of the troops he trained and worked with relied on one another for him to promote that sort of thinking. That doesn't mean that I didn't notice the tension, or why.

The South is a melange of forces and influences, and even by the waters, things are often murky with how folks relate to one another. You can't love a place, without acknowledging all its quirks and influences, and ignorance and blinding hate often go hand in hand with culture of gentility and grace, hate mixed with love of place, love of neighbor, and to ignore it, is to allow it to fester. Better to get it in the open, deal with it--like we did with my Grandmother, and then ease the worst parts out by acknowledging where things have gone wrong. The South, it can claim that it was the War of Northern Aggression, and carpetbaggers, that consigned it to years of stagnation and hate, but that is to ignore the real and underlying rot that infected the South for longer. A slave system fostered a lot of ignorance. A political system that promoted hate over peace, that looked to demonize others, as opposed to dealing with its own issues, and an economic system that took advantage of a lot of folks, and allowed their schools to stagnate as much as their economy, while taking the best and brightest, and keeping them walled up.

Despite this, the South is an amazing place. Full of people who are warm and kind, generous and God fearing, and filled with wonders and pride of place. It also goes with that, a lot of blind and ancient hatreds that go back to that very code of honor that doesn't let sleeping dogs lay, and the holding onto that history, also keeps the same hatreds in play all these years later, and looking for scapegoats, and plenty of folks who managed to make a killing on the backs of the ignorant like to keep them exactly there, and keep their eyes pointed away from those who are responsible for their plight, and who are looking to rape the very lands that they love so dear.

The worst critics of the South, they aren't the folks who have never been, but those who have lived and breathed in these lands, who have red clay baked into their souls, and who understand her; her waters, her forests, her rivers and streams, and loving her, want her to rise above the years and come out better. Freer. Who understand her potential, the depth of her people, and still recognize that there is a long way to go to making her live up to that potential.

Racism isn't alone responsible for the conditions in the South, it is a symptom of a rot deep in the halls of power, and exploited and nursed along, to give folks something to point to as a reason. You can love the South and acknowledge that. You can love a place, and a people, and still have eyes open on her faults and her challenges.
2013-02-17 11:34:30 PM
4 votes:

Generation_D: // But the Civil War was not about slavery, but rather States Rights.


Yes. States Rights to legally to own slaves.
These morons act as if these are different subjects.

/Kudzu-covers up most of the shiat in Mississippi. But you can still smell it.
2013-02-18 01:19:02 AM
3 votes:

Generation_D: Why repeal a law that was imposed by Northern Carpetbaggers during the Great War of Northern Aggression. The South will Rise again, and once it does these laws will be needed to still be in place.

// But the Civil War was not about slavery, but rather States Rights.


This is what neoconfederates actually believe.
2013-02-17 09:32:49 PM
3 votes:
I bet most states haven't passed a law banning the quartering of troops in peacetime, either. The supremacy clause kind of got that federal versus state question pretty well settled.
2013-02-18 12:46:18 AM
2 votes:
hubiestubert:

I almost cried and if you're not writing a book you should.
2013-02-18 12:25:24 AM
2 votes:

Rufus Lee King: Even looks like a prison:


Dude, every school looks like a prison and/or is set up near a prison for tax reasons. Welcome to America.

/we used to wave to Amy Fisher's cell block from science class
//seriously
2013-02-17 11:53:00 PM
2 votes:

Rufus Lee King: Let me reiterate: I grew up in Mississippi and the white population was NOT the problem.


Well, I don't know about anyone else but that post totes convinced me that Mississippi no longer has a problem with race relations.

/Totes.
2013-02-17 11:42:01 PM
2 votes:
Now, hold your horses...When we are talking about "Mississippi" which is special kind of retarded, I mean special.
2013-02-17 11:35:04 PM
2 votes:

Lsherm: DamnYankees: I didn't think any Southern state ratified the 13th amendment, as it was passed without them.

They went back and had ratification votes later.  Mississippi didn't manage to do it in 1995 because paperwork is confusing and shiat.


That's the nicest way I've ever seen someone allude to an illiterate state.
2013-02-17 09:59:43 PM
2 votes:
Why repeal a law that was imposed by Northern Carpetbaggers during the Great War of Northern Aggression. The South will Rise again, and once it does these laws will be needed to still be in place.

// But the Civil War was not about slavery, but rather States Rights.
2013-02-18 01:21:57 PM
1 votes:

AverageAmericanGuy: The 3/5 thing did not comment on or define the personhood of slaves, it only described how slaves would be counted for the purpose of determining representation.  Saying that we're counting 60% of a group for census purposes is not the same thing as saying "they're only partially people".

While it may not be your intention to reduce the personhood of a group, by creating laws that treats them as lesser beings, you automatically create a system that keeps them under the thumb of the "real" citizens.

See what  Surat Al-Baqarah 2:282 has done to women in Islamic countries.


The nice thing is that 'reducing the personhood' (I still disagree with that characterization of the 3/5 thing) actually weakened the slave states.  If we consider full representation as "fully honoring their personhood", it was the slave states that wanted this, and they definitely didn't want this for the benefit of the slaves.  Surely we don't think that the slave states were the good guys in terms of human rights vis-a-vis slavery because they wanted all their slaves counted, do we?  Counting 100% of the slaves would have only served to strenghten the slave states.

It was the free states, which are largely viewed as the good guys in terms of slavery and human rights that DID NOT want the slaves counted all.

If we assume that the 3/5 compromise="slaves were 3/5 of a person", then this means the free states were terrible because they wanted 0/5 of the slave counted ie., slaves weren't people, while the slave states were nice humanitarians because they wanted all slaves 'treated as whole persons' (5/5 of a person)

When you look at it like this, any kind of complaining or lamenting about the 3/5 compromise is misguided and woefully uninformed.
2013-02-18 02:10:03 AM
1 votes:

hubiestubert: Uchiha_Cycliste: hubiestubert: ruta: And it was a fascinating post but by about the third sentence my inner reader flipped to the voice of Morgan Freeman, which made the hints that the narrator is white sound very weird.

If it is any consolation, my mother is Japanese, and I was born in Okinawa. ;)

can I ask if they met before or after Vietnam?

After my Dad's last tour. He lied about his age, and went, then signed up for another. He was all of twenty when I came along, having met a pretty native girl. He was 19 when they met, and a seasoned vet. It was an odd time.


Makes sense. I was curious since you had mentioned that the war had changed his views on a number of things. It must have been frustrating (even if only a little) to return to the South after those changes, especially if it was one of those things you didn't talk about (I have no idea if that's true),
2013-02-18 02:03:17 AM
1 votes:

Uchiha_Cycliste: hubiestubert: ruta: And it was a fascinating post but by about the third sentence my inner reader flipped to the voice of Morgan Freeman, which made the hints that the narrator is white sound very weird.

If it is any consolation, my mother is Japanese, and I was born in Okinawa. ;)

can I ask if they met before or after Vietnam?


After my Dad's last tour. He lied about his age, and went, then signed up for another. He was all of twenty when I came along, having met a pretty native girl. He was 19 when they met, and a seasoned vet. It was an odd time.
2013-02-18 01:59:26 AM
1 votes:
hubiestubert:

Holy cow. A well-reasoned and extremely thoughtful comment on fark. All good reading, and I have to comment on one bit:

Racism isn't alone responsible for the conditions in the South, it is a symptom of a rot deep in the halls of power, and exploited and nursed along, to give folks something to point to as a reason. You can love the South and acknowledge that. You can love a place, and a people, and still have eyes open on her faults and her challenges.

I was thinking about this a couple months ago as the latest bit of TX Gov. Rick Perry's "Cancer Prevention" fund - several billion bucks of taxpayer money - is documented as being managed by people with the ethics of Ken Lay, the oversight of their auditors, and apparent outrage that anyone would actually have a problem with them simply writing checks from the treasury to their donors and friends. And this is one of the smaller scandals in TX government. Current scandals.

I grew up in the NYC area, and there were scandals all the time, it seemed there wasn't a month when some politician was being perp-walked into an arraignment hearing. But that was the point: Stealing from the government was considered bad, and if you found out someone was doing it, you had them locked up. You might find a co-conspirator, might get away with it for a few years - but sooner or later, you'd get sloppy, you'd get fired, financially ruined, and go to prison, along with all the people stupid enough to get in on your genius scheme.

Hell, a few months ago I happened to be visiting relatives up there and picked up the local paper. Some local elected official was on their way to jail for mis-using a parking permit. Total value, probably south of $500. And people were outraged, demanding the guy's head on a stake. Perfectly understandable, they *should* be angry at thieves.

Much of the anti-government sentiment in the south can probably be traced to the face that so much of government in the south is fundamentally corrupt, in an open and brazen manner, and many voters who consider themselves republican might well be voting to re-elect Rick Perry and similar crooks on the theory that with democrats, there would simply be more crooks. If your only experience with government is with people like George Wallace, Rick Perry, and George W. Bush, and whatever the urine-sample guy in FL's name is, you'd probably assume (with some justification) that the only hope to limit the level of thievery is to limit the number of thieves.
2013-02-18 01:51:35 AM
1 votes:

12349876: Rufus Lee King: Let me reiterate: I grew up in Mississippi and the white population was NOT the problem.

They vote Republican, that makes them the problem.


I suppose you have a solution to this Republican  problem?
2013-02-18 01:40:08 AM
1 votes:

austerity101: Aigoo: Slavery is an abomination, and so were the Fugitive Slave Laws (of both 1793 and 1850). But no one here gets to play morally superior except VT, CT, RI, Mass, Michigan, Maine, Kansas and Wisconsin

Wow, New Hampshire has been the weird libertarian bastard of New England for some time, apparently.


New Hampshire still has votes to leave the Union from time to time. It is kinda how they roll.
2013-02-18 01:37:49 AM
1 votes:

Aigoo: Slavery is an abomination, and so were the Fugitive Slave Laws (of both 1793 and 1850). But no one here gets to play morally superior except VT, CT, RI, Mass, Michigan, Maine, Kansas and Wisconsin


Wow, New Hampshire has been the weird libertarian bastard of New England for some time, apparently.
2013-02-18 01:31:31 AM
1 votes:

tinfoil-hat maggie: hubiestubert: tinfoil-hat maggie: hubiestubert: tinfoil-hat maggie: hubiestubert:

I almost cried and if you're not writing a book you should.

Written two, looking for a publisher and agent right now. My profile has a link the Lake of the Dead, which has a short from a while back. Of course, the novels are a blue collar science fiction romp, and the other is a hard boiled fantasy tale about a bounty hunter looking to put down his own shadow before his apprentice can kill him for his own good, so they are perhaps less prosaic...

You almost sound like you were influenced by Tanith Lee.

More Heinlein, John D. MacDonald and Pat Conroy. My Dad did throw some Anne McCaffrey my way, but I don't know if it took.

Check out Sometimes after Sunset and Tales of the flat Earth if you get a chance.


I have been known to take the advice of smart gals on occasion where reading material goes. I'll see if my local shop has her stuff--which they should.
2013-02-18 01:26:50 AM
1 votes:

hubiestubert: tinfoil-hat maggie: hubiestubert: tinfoil-hat maggie: hubiestubert:

I almost cried and if you're not writing a book you should.

Written two, looking for a publisher and agent right now. My profile has a link the Lake of the Dead, which has a short from a while back. Of course, the novels are a blue collar science fiction romp, and the other is a hard boiled fantasy tale about a bounty hunter looking to put down his own shadow before his apprentice can kill him for his own good, so they are perhaps less prosaic...

You almost sound like you were influenced by Tanith Lee.

More Heinlein, John D. MacDonald and Pat Conroy. My Dad did throw some Anne McCaffrey my way, but I don't know if it took.


Check out Sometimes after Sunset and Tales of the flat Earth if you get a chance.
2013-02-18 01:20:35 AM
1 votes:

hubiestubert: The worst critics of the South, they aren't the folks who have never been, but those who have lived and breathed in these lands, who have red clay baked into their souls, and who understand her; her waters, her forests, her rivers and streams, and loving her, want her to rise above the years and come out better. Freer. Who understand her potential, the depth of her people, and still recognize that there is a long way to go to making her live up to that potential.

Racism isn't alone responsible for the conditions in the South, it is a symptom of a rot deep in the halls of power, and exploited and nursed along, to give folks something to point to as a reason. You can love the South and acknowledge that. You can love a place, and a people, and still have eyes open on her faults and her challenges.


[audienceclapping.gif]

Seriously, well done.

/Dammit, now I want a Mint julep, southern fried steak and grits.
//And I don't even know what grits are.
///They might be illegal in Canada or something, never seen 'em on a menu.
2013-02-18 01:16:44 AM
1 votes:

tinfoil-hat maggie: hubiestubert: tinfoil-hat maggie: hubiestubert:

I almost cried and if you're not writing a book you should.

Written two, looking for a publisher and agent right now. My profile has a link the Lake of the Dead, which has a short from a while back. Of course, the novels are a blue collar science fiction romp, and the other is a hard boiled fantasy tale about a bounty hunter looking to put down his own shadow before his apprentice can kill him for his own good, so they are perhaps less prosaic...

You almost sound like you were influenced by Tanith Lee.


More Heinlein, John D. MacDonald and Pat Conroy. My Dad did throw some Anne McCaffrey my way, but I don't know if it took.
2013-02-18 01:14:30 AM
1 votes:

Generation_D: Why repeal a law that was imposed by Northern Carpetbaggers during the Great War of Northern Aggression. The South will Rise again, and once it does these laws will be needed to still be in place.

// But the Civil War was not about slavery, but rather States Rights.


The states "rights" to own humans as cattle, apparently.

questgarden.com
2013-02-18 01:12:40 AM
1 votes:

hubiestubert: tinfoil-hat maggie: hubiestubert:

I almost cried and if you're not writing a book you should.

Written two, looking for a publisher and agent right now. My profile has a link the Lake of the Dead, which has a short from a while back. Of course, the novels are a blue collar science fiction romp, and the other is a hard boiled fantasy tale about a bounty hunter looking to put down his own shadow before his apprentice can kill him for his own good, so they are perhaps less prosaic...


You almost sound like you were influenced by Tanith Lee.
2013-02-18 01:03:12 AM
1 votes:
hubiestubert: your words remind me of the area of NJ I grew up in. it wasn't until i was older and away from there that i realized it was a mostly Christian lily white community because that's the way Realtors used to treat people. very heavy on the 'birds of a feather flock together' mind set. i don't know if that's necessarily a bad thing; many folks are most comfortable among their own people. some may see that as racist but those same people never think twice about fully closed 'Chinatowns' and other tightly knit ethnic communities where only their own are welcome (unless you come to spend money and leave).

i've been South many times and I love it. good food, good folks, air is good to breathe. can't say i'll ever go back to Atlanta though. i've been to all sorts of neighborhoods but folks in Atlanta were the angriest i ever been around. but i'd live down South in a minute, no problem.
2013-02-18 12:54:39 AM
1 votes:

Lsherm: DamnYankees: I didn't think any Southern state ratified the 13th amendment, as it was passed without them.

They went back and had ratification votes later.  Mississippi didn't manage to do it in 1995 because paperwork is confusing and shiat.


Not quite. The reason they didn't ratify it before 1995 is because the racist farksticks those guys like to elect probably would have voted it down before that. The reason it took an additional 18 years and a Steven Spielberg movie before they made it official is because paperwork is confusing and shiat.
2013-02-18 12:50:08 AM
1 votes:

DarkLancelot: Aar1012: Generation_D: Why repeal a law that was imposed by Northern Carpetbaggers during the Great War of Northern Aggression. The South will Rise again, and once it does these laws will be needed to still be in place.

// But the Civil War was not about slavery, but rather States Rights.

I know that you were being facetious, but I always like to ask about the Fugitive Slave Act when someone does mention the States' Rights thing.

Someone of a like mind I see.  I love asking how the States' Rights people can try and support the FSA, like all of the states that rebelled surely did.


Oh, you mean like President Lincoln strongly supported it? And like those living in border states who were loyal to the Union government (even if their state had seceded) were bound by it until it was finally repealed nearly 3 months after the war's end, clearly indicating that plenty of Union government officials also supported it? Because, you know, only Southerners who had seceded just because they wanted to commit the reprehensible act of owning another human being would support such a thing, right?

Slavery is an abomination, and so were the Fugitive Slave Laws (of both 1793 and 1850). But no one here gets to play morally superior except VT, CT, RI, Mass, Michigan, Maine, Kansas and Wisconsin, which are the states which passed laws against the FSA and declined to enforce it, instead extending habeas corpus, jury trial, and civil due process rights to all, regardless of color or charges and punishing those who lied--even white men who claimed black men and women were slaves when they were not. Wisconsin declared the FSA unConstitutional and the Federal Gov't told them it superceded their state laws. That alone would have been enough to turn me secessionist because it's farking tyranny. But Lincoln himself said that if he could preserve the Union by outlawing slavery he would and if he could preserve the Union by keeping slavery legal, he would. So no, the Civil War was not 100% about slavery. Had it been, Lincoln could have prevented it with a word--a fact which he himself was very well aware of.
2013-02-18 12:49:21 AM
1 votes:
Hey, Mississippi, the reason it took until now to ratify the amendment isn't because you are "deliberate" it is because you are as backwards as all fark. There are still a host of other issues where you are firmly on the wrong side of history, and on those you also will not come around until long after the whole rest of the world gets it.
2013-02-18 12:48:10 AM
1 votes:

ruta: hubiestubert: Old Son, I grew up in the South. South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana. Few times in each and I love the South. I love the people, I love the culture, the food, and the history, the pride of place, the fishing, the hunting, even the snakes and critters.

"Fascinating" isn't the right word either. I should have said "beautiful". Your post has made me want to visit the South. And I feel a bit bad about the Morgan Freeman joke, but once he's on it's hard to shut him off.


Beautiful is right. I wouldn't mind visiting either, and not just for the Everglades.

/Just visit, though.
//Pretty sure the climate would kill me, otherwise.
2013-02-18 12:36:47 AM
1 votes:

hubiestubert: Old Son, I grew up in the South. South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana. Few times in each and I love the South. I love the people, I love the culture, the food, and the history, the pride of place, the fishing, the hunting, even the snakes and critters.


"Fascinating" isn't the right word either. I should have said "beautiful". Your post has made me want to visit the South. And I feel a bit bad about the Morgan Freeman joke, but once he's on it's hard to shut him off.
2013-02-18 12:35:45 AM
1 votes:

ruta: And it was a fascinating post but by about the third sentence my inner reader flipped to the voice of Morgan Freeman, which made the hints that the narrator is white sound very weird.


If it is any consolation, my mother is Japanese, and I was born in Okinawa. ;)
2013-02-18 12:32:49 AM
1 votes:

Rufus Lee King: Let me reiterate: I grew up in Mississippi and the white population was NOT the problem.



Clearly from your post, racism is dead in the great state of Mississippi. Thank you for clearing that up.
2013-02-18 12:30:57 AM
1 votes:
And it was a fascinating post but by about the third sentence my inner reader flipped to the voice of Morgan Freeman, which made the hints that the narrator is white sound very weird.
2013-02-18 12:30:15 AM
1 votes:

hubiestubert: Old Son, I grew up in the South. South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana. Few times in each and I love the South. I love the people, I love the culture, the food, and the history, the pride of place, the fishing, the hunting, even the snakes and critters.


Is it sad that I read this in the voice of Francis Underwood?
2013-02-18 12:29:17 AM
1 votes:

hubiestubert: Rufus Lee King: Good Lord, yet another race-baiting, white-people-are-evil thread on FARK? Amazing

P.S. I grew up in Mississippi. Did any of you? It's not like it's portrayed on "The Simpsons", or whatever. Goddamned racists.Seriously.

Old Son, I grew up in the South. South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana. Few times in each and I love the South. I love the people, I love the culture, the food, and the history, the pride of place, the fishing, the hunting, even the snakes and critters.

But the South if a dichotomy of both pride and gentility laid over a background that has virulent hate and ignorance. It's not just the poor white trash, in Atlanta there are gated communities for primarily black families, and for a reason. One cannot grow up in the South without an appreciation for that history, and some of that history is less than kindly.

When I was in 2nd grade, I was in a place called Whitmire, South Carolina. Logging country, and smack dab in some of the finest timber country in the whole state, owned primarily by my neighbors, who rented their parent's old home to my Grandmother. Not even near at a fair price, they happened to like her because she was upper management at the JP Regal plant down the road. They wanted someone nice to look after the old place. The thing that struck me, and I didn't realize this really until a few years later, despite being in the heart of the South, I don't recall a single black face in the town of Whitmire itself. In the plant, certainly. In the surrounding towns. Not in my school. These were generous, church going folk. Kind, warm, gentle, with always a good word. I walked the streets, and learned to ride my bike there. I went to the drug store to get a cherry phosphate or ice cream. It wasn't until years later that I realized that the town was very much segregated, and not by anything so blatant as "Whites Only" signs, but houses simply didn't go to rent or for sale often. There were certainly black faces at the ch ...


Titty sprinkles.
2013-02-18 12:03:03 AM
1 votes:

Lsherm: ansius: From the article:
'The resolution passed both the Mississippi Senate and House.
"It was unanimous," Frazier recalled. "Some didn't vote, but we didn't receive a 'nay' vote."'

Who the Fark abstained from voting on an anti-slavery bill in 1995?

Maybe people who weren't there for the vote?


Anyone know a way to fact check that. My guess is most of them were absent, however, the way it is worded in the article about "some didn't vote" makes me believe that yes, some people honestly abstained from voting on an anti-slavery bill in 1995. I could be reading more into it, but it would be fascinating to see if any of the abstains were in person.
2013-02-17 11:57:42 PM
1 votes:
Well since I'm in Alabama all I can say is thank you Mississippi ; )
2013-02-17 11:53:41 PM
1 votes:

Rufus Lee King: Let me reiterate: I grew up in Mississippi and the white population was NOT the problem.


Of course it wasn't.
*pats head*
2013-02-17 11:53:31 PM
1 votes:

Shaggy_C: I bet most states haven't passed a law banning the quartering of troops in peacetime, either. The supremacy clause kind of got that federal versus state question pretty well settled.


yes but... slavery had a state's rights flavor to it and I'm serious, some people still think it would be good or right to have slavery. So it makes a nice 'were with the program' statement.

and on a side note:
I get pretty torqued when I'm in West Virgina and see all the rebel flag crap and hear about 'our heritage'.  FFS WV split from Virginia as WV opposed slavery and VA did not.
2013-02-17 11:52:19 PM
1 votes:

Shaggy_C: I bet most states haven't passed a law banning the quartering of troops in peacetime, either. The supremacy clause kind of got that federal versus state question pretty well settled.


The Supremacy clause has nothing (or little) to do with whether or not states can quarter troops in your home.  The Bill of Rights did not apply to the states until sometime after the 13th and 14th Amendments were ratified and the various rights covered by the Bill of Rights were 'incorporated' against the stated under the post civil war amendments.  Technically the 3rd Amendment has never been held to apply to the states by the Supreme Court, mostly because it doesn't come up very often.  There was one case where the 2nd Circuit held that the 3rd Amendment applied to states attempting to quarter National Guard troops in prison housing during a prison guard strike.  That's the only case I can find that suggested the 3rd Amendment applies to the states and it held that it was because of the 14th Amendment.
2013-02-17 11:47:53 PM
1 votes:
I remember a bit on Saturday Night Live's Weekend Update.
Dennis Miller read this story about Mississippi finally ratifying the 13th amendment.

"sources say they would have gotten around to it sooner but they had this big cotton crop that had to be brought in"
2013-02-17 11:46:17 PM
1 votes:

Larry Mahnken: DamnYankees: I didn't think any Southern state ratified the 13th amendment, as it was passed without them.

There weren't enough Northern States to ratify it alone.  Remember, it was the North's position that the South never left the Union.


I actually thought it was required to rejoin the Union
2013-02-17 11:45:35 PM
1 votes:

Bastard Toadflax: quatchi: Mississippi? Learning?

That would make a good movie title.


www.dbcovers.com

If I had any PS skillz...
2013-02-17 11:45:04 PM
1 votes:
Too bad it doesn't matter.

Supremacy clause and all that...
2013-02-17 10:50:44 PM
1 votes:

Generation_D: Why repeal a law that was imposed by Northern Carpetbaggers during the Great War of Northern Aggression. The South will Rise again, and once it does these laws will be needed to still be in place.

// But the Civil War was not about slavery, but rather States Rights.


I know that you were being facetious, but I always like to ask about the Fugitive Slave Act when someone does mention the States' Rights thing.
2013-02-17 10:21:17 PM
1 votes:
DamnYankees: I didn't think any Southern state ratified the 13th amendment, as it was passed without them.

yea, no shiat. Juneteenth exists because Texas decided to keep the abolition of slavery under wraps.
2013-02-17 10:17:56 PM
1 votes:

DamnYankees: I didn't think any Southern state ratified the 13th amendment, as it was passed without them.


They went back and had ratification votes later.  Mississippi didn't manage to do it in 1995 because paperwork is confusing and shiat.
2013-02-17 09:38:30 PM
1 votes:
They're just ahead of the curve for the time when it's revoked and people are auctioned off to cover their debts.
2013-02-17 09:26:31 PM
1 votes:
That night, Batra - a native of India who became a U.S. citizen in 2008 - went on the usconstitution.net website, learning the rest of the story.

Mississippi? Learning?

Well, *that* makes a nice change.

But there was an asterisk beside Mississippi

Like with Bonds and McGuire in the Hall of Fame?
 
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