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(Clarion-Ledger)   Man watching Lincoln movie discovers that Mississippi never officially officially ratified a ban on slavery, because Mississippi   (clarionledger.com) divider line 146
    More: Obvious, Mississippi, University of Mississippi Medical Center, two-thirds vote, watch  
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12978 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Feb 2013 at 11:11 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-18 02:39:36 AM

Rufus Lee King: Good Lord, yet another race-baiting, white-people-are-evil thread on FARK? Amazing

P.S. I grew up in Mississippi. Did any of you? It's not like it's portrayed on "The Simpsons", or whatever. Goddamned racists.Seriously.

 
2013-02-18 02:39:46 AM

hubiestubert: r" when they realize how often I've moved over the years, but then again, you get a perspective about the country when you travel it. Not just travel and play tourist, but live there for a year or two and then you find somewhere else. Heck, did the seasonal thing for several years while I was in college--lived in my college town, moved to where the work was in the summer, and then moved back to said college town, and that's been the pattern for most of my life.

I do sort of get wistful when I hear Please Come to Boston, because it would be nice to have a place to call home for more than a year or two, but then again, that's been the pattern of my life...


That sounds just crazy to me. From a purely selfish perspective I have technical career goals which should take at least a solid 20 years at my company to accomplish. But I also have a lot of friends and family near(ish) and want to start a family too someday. I guess there's a trade off though from not being able to see and experience as much. Ironically it's hard to say which is better since few have exp both since the two scenarios are rather mutually exclusive.  Do you think you;ve gained more through all your travels and residencies than you could have gained by being less nomadic? Is it even an answerable question?
 
2013-02-18 02:44:28 AM

Aigoo: DarkLancelot: Aar1012: Generation_D: Why repeal a law that was imposed by Northern Carpetbaggers during the Great War of Northern Aggression. The South will Rise again, and once it does these laws will be needed to still be in place.

// But the Civil War was not about slavery, but rather States Rights.

I know that you were being facetious, but I always like to ask about the Fugitive Slave Act when someone does mention the States' Rights thing.

Someone of a like mind I see.  I love asking how the States' Rights people can try and support the FSA, like all of the states that rebelled surely did.

Oh, you mean like President Lincoln strongly supported it? And like those living in border states who were loyal to the Union government (even if their state had seceded) were bound by it until it was finally repealed nearly 3 months after the war's end, clearly indicating that plenty of Union government officials also supported it? Because, you know, only Southerners who had seceded just because they wanted to commit the reprehensible act of owning another human being would support such a thing, right?

Slavery is an abomination, and so were the Fugitive Slave Laws (of both 1793 and 1850). But no one here gets to play morally superior except VT, CT, RI, Mass, Michigan, Maine, Kansas and Wisconsin, which are the states which passed laws against the FSA and declined to enforce it, instead extending habeas corpus, jury trial, and civil due process rights to all, regardless of color or charges and punishing those who lied--even white men who claimed black men and women were slaves when they were not. Wisconsin declared the FSA unConstitutional and the Federal Gov't told them it superceded their state laws. That alone would have been enough to turn me secessionist because it's farking tyranny. But Lincoln himself said that if he could preserve the Union by outlawing slavery he would and if he could preserve the Union by keeping slavery legal, he would. So no, the Civil War was ...


The south succeeded entirely due to slavery, they even said so. And Lincoln was lying- he was playing to a union populace that was still rather divided on the question of slavery, especially in border states where slavery was still legal. He knew that if he explicitly laid out the war as an anti-slavery crusade at the beginning, he would lose the border states, and the Union would fall.

Besides, Lincoln could not have

Aigoo: So no, the Civil War was not 100% about slavery. Had it been, Lincoln could have prevented it with a word--a fact which he himself was very well aware of.


As for this, what word? You're talking nonsense. He did not have the power to ban slavery, nor did he have the power to wholly legalize it. And southerners didn't believe him when he said in the campaign he wouldn't try to alter the status quo, why would they believe him as President?
 
2013-02-18 02:45:15 AM

remus: Corvus: ansius: From the article:
'The resolution passed both the Mississippi Senate and House.
"It was unanimous," Frazier recalled. "Some didn't vote, but we didn't receive a 'nay' vote."'

Who the Fark abstained from voting on an anti-slavery bill in 1995?

I thought the same thing.

It says "some didn't vote", that's NOT the same as abstaining.  It could simply mean they were not present for the vote, which is pretty common.  It's not at all unusual for even the US Senate or House to have members not present for a vote, even on big things.


It is not clear. "Some didn't vote" includes both absences and refusals to vote. So there very well may have been abstentions. His phrasing it that way is probably intentionally covering up the fact that some legislators indeed abstained rather than vote "yes".
 
2013-02-18 02:49:39 AM

Kevin72: The best part of Mississippi, and also Alabama, North Florida, Louisiana is the ghosts. Way more peaceful, present, and focused than in other parts of the country.


Well there are ghost here, but in my little corner of north Alabama it's not so bad and well the country is beautiful. I also love the mountains and woods the people well there are good ones out their even though we have plenty that vote for our stupid politicians.
 
2013-02-18 02:53:41 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: hubiestubert: r" when they realize how often I've moved over the years, but then again, you get a perspective about the country when you travel it. Not just travel and play tourist, but live there for a year or two and then you find somewhere else. Heck, did the seasonal thing for several years while I was in college--lived in my college town, moved to where the work was in the summer, and then moved back to said college town, and that's been the pattern for most of my life.

I do sort of get wistful when I hear Please Come to Boston, because it would be nice to have a place to call home for more than a year or two, but then again, that's been the pattern of my life...

That sounds just crazy to me. From a purely selfish perspective I have technical career goals which should take at least a solid 20 years at my company to accomplish. But I also have a lot of friends and family near(ish) and want to start a family too someday. I guess there's a trade off though from not being able to see and experience as much. Ironically it's hard to say which is better since few have exp both since the two scenarios are rather mutually exclusive.  Do you think you;ve gained more through all your travels and residencies than you could have gained by being less nomadic? Is it even an answerable question?


I'm a chef. For me, this is professional development. You work with great chefs, you learn from every gig you have. Worked for some greats, worked with some nationally known names, worked with the NHL, and worked with local greats. Learning regional cuisines isn't about just reading, but in the sampling, of seeing the differences in styles up close. It also helps to see differences in operations from varied perspectives. From smaller joints, large venues, banquet houses, and corporate gigs. Every job adds experience, and gives you a deeper understanding of the business. Even Mom and Pop operations. The last five years, I've seen haute cuisine, sports entertainment with the Phoenix Coyotes, a failed attempt to franchise by a Denver sports bar--failures are instructive--as well as fine cuisine with the Deerfield Inn, and the Mom and Pop place that I'm at now. Mind you, Christopher's was only about four months, and it was enough. FuNuGyz only lasted three months before the management folded, and I spent two and a half years with Aramark with the Arena. The Inn got asploded thanks to Irene, and that has led me to the gig I'm at now. All of them are instructional, and all of them build a resume with varied experience. For chefs, that is important. Some like to specialize, but that's for insects in my book. I can do BBQ, I can do fine dining, I can ethnic, I can do New American, and more. That gives a breadth of knowledge that is necessary to run kitchens, and run them efficiently.
 
2013-02-18 02:59:10 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thirteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_State s _Constitution

New Jersey (January 23, 1866, after having rejected it on March 16, 1865)
Delaware (February 12, 1901, after having rejected it on February 8, 1865)

Those progressives up north.
 
2013-02-18 03:06:44 AM

hubiestubert: I'm a chef. For me, this is professional development. You work with great chefs, you learn from every gig you have. Worked for some greats, worked with some nationally known names, worked with the NHL, and worked with local greats. Learning regional cuisines isn't about just reading, but in the sampling, of seeing the differences in styles up close. It also helps to see differences in operations from varied perspectives. From smaller joints, large venues, banquet houses, and corporate gigs. Every job adds experience, and gives you a deeper understanding of the business. Even Mom and Pop operations. The last five years, I've seen haute cuisine, sports entertainment with the Phoenix Coyotes, a failed attempt to franchise by a Denver sports bar--failures are instructive--as well as fine cuisine with the Deerfield Inn, and the Mom and Pop place that I'm at now. Mind you, Christopher's was only about four months, and it was enough. FuNuGyz only lasted three months before the management folded, and I spent two and a half years with Aramark with the Arena. The Inn got asploded thanks to Irene, and that has led me to the gig I'm at now. All of them are instructional, and all of them build a resume with varied experience. For chefs, that is important. Some like to specialize, but that's for insects in my book. I can do BBQ, I can do fine dining, I can ethnic, I can do New American, and more. That gives a breadth of knowledge that is necessary to run kitchens, and run them efficiently.


That sounds pretty awesome (professionally). I hadn't considered a possibility like that, So, you had many experiences and adventures all around and about. Let's imagine that you could have had all the same cooking and restaurant experiences but all in the same region. How do you think your experiences and outlooks been shaped by the fact these jobs *were* all over and not in a single area.
 
2013-02-18 03:07:43 AM

Born2Fart: Aar1012: Generation_D: Why repeal a law that was imposed by Northern Carpetbaggers during the Great War of Northern Aggression. The South will Rise again, and once it does these laws will be needed to still be in place.

// But the Civil War was not about slavery, but rather States Rights.

I know that you were being facetious, but I always like to ask about the Fugitive Slave Act when someone does mention the States' Rights thing.

I like to mention 3/5 a person in response.



You do understand that that's probably the best that could have occurred, given the time, right?

The slave states wanted representation based on a count of all of their slaves, basically 5/5 of a person.  Assuming the free states went along with it, the slave states would have had even more power.  Only an idiot would think that making the slaves states stronger would be a good thing for slaves or the larger cause of human rights.

Had the slave states dug their heels in and refused to compromise, the free states could have decided to form a separate union, meaning a 'free' United States and a 'slave' United States.  I can't imagine a scenario where that's good for slavery or human rights.

Has the free states dug their heels in and insisted on ZERO representation (0/5 of a person), the slave states would have been weaker.  I see this as a good thing and the best outcome IF it worked.  It most likely would not have worked as the slave states probably wouldn't have gone for it, so we're back to two countries again.

In retrospect, 3/5 is probably the best thing in the long term for the cause of human rights and slavery.

The 3/5 thing did not comment on or define the personhood of slaves, it only described how slaves would be counted for the purpose of determining representation.  Saying that we're counting 60% of a group for census purposes is not the same thing as saying "they're only partially people".  When you're enslaving people, you're not really taking their humanity into consideration.
 
2013-02-18 03:23:07 AM
The 3/5 thing did not comment on or define the personhood of slaves, it only described how slaves would be counted for the purpose of determining representation.  Saying that we're counting 60% of a group for census purposes is not the same thing as saying "they're only partially people".

While it may not be your intention to reduce the personhood of a group, by creating laws that treats them as lesser beings, you automatically create a system that keeps them under the thumb of the "real" citizens.

See what  Surat Al-Baqarah 2:282 has done to women in Islamic countries.
 
2013-02-18 03:23:54 AM

hubiestubert: Rusty Cundieff did a bit about this on TV Nation, and he bought the last legal slaves...


img805.imageshack.us
 
2013-02-18 03:29:03 AM

jigger: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thirteenth_Amendment_to_the_United_State s _Constitution

New Jersey (January 23, 1866, after having rejected it on March 16, 1865)
Delaware (February 12, 1901, after having rejected it on February 8, 1865)

Those progressives up north.


I think you should read up on Delaware and slavery. You'll get a surprise.
 
2013-02-18 03:31:49 AM

ciberido: hubiestubert: Rusty Cundieff did a bit about this on TV Nation, and he bought the last legal slaves...

[img805.imageshack.us image 560x371]


Well sure if you have a dollar to spare ; )
Just a song ; )
 
2013-02-18 03:37:37 AM

Uchiha_Cycliste: hubiestubert: I'm a chef. For me, this is professional development. You work with great chefs, you learn from every gig you have. Worked for some greats, worked with some nationally known names, worked with the NHL, and worked with local greats. Learning regional cuisines isn't about just reading, but in the sampling, of seeing the differences in styles up close. It also helps to see differences in operations from varied perspectives. From smaller joints, large venues, banquet houses, and corporate gigs. Every job adds experience, and gives you a deeper understanding of the business. Even Mom and Pop operations. The last five years, I've seen haute cuisine, sports entertainment with the Phoenix Coyotes, a failed attempt to franchise by a Denver sports bar--failures are instructive--as well as fine cuisine with the Deerfield Inn, and the Mom and Pop place that I'm at now. Mind you, Christopher's was only about four months, and it was enough. FuNuGyz only lasted three months before the management folded, and I spent two and a half years with Aramark with the Arena. The Inn got asploded thanks to Irene, and that has led me to the gig I'm at now. All of them are instructional, and all of them build a resume with varied experience. For chefs, that is important. Some like to specialize, but that's for insects in my book. I can do BBQ, I can do fine dining, I can ethnic, I can do New American, and more. That gives a breadth of knowledge that is necessary to run kitchens, and run them efficiently.

That sounds pretty awesome (professionally). I hadn't considered a possibility like that, So, you had many experiences and adventures all around and about. Let's imagine that you could have had all the same cooking and restaurant experiences but all in the same region. How do you think your experiences and outlooks been shaped by the fact these jobs *were* all over and not in a single area.


I've been in and around Western Mass for some time. I know chefs and distributors in the area pretty well. And that comes in handy. The business is practically driven by gossip, and you trade cooks and waitstaff around a fair bit, so there is some diffusion with staff that you work with for a time, and then they wander off, but put in a good word elsewhere, or you keep tabs of elsewhere and you bring them back into the fold after some time, and you both learn something from it.

I left Western Mass, and returned. I left Maine and returned. Each time you do, you have more experience under your belt, and that means that the gigs all influence on another.
 
2013-02-18 03:54:55 AM

tinfoil-hat maggie: ciberido: hubiestubert: Rusty Cundieff did a bit about this on TV Nation, and he bought the last legal slaves...

[img805.imageshack.us image 560x371]

Well sure if you have a dollar to spare ; )
Just a song ; )


I do like the fact that he wished his boys well, after they had to be let go. "There goes one happy white boy..."

/If you want to hit up holidays, there's always The Dollyrots...
 
2013-02-18 03:58:52 AM
FTFA: "It was unanimous," Frazier recalled. "Some didn't vote, but we didn't receive a 'nay' vote."

Someone needs to learn the difference between "unanimous" and "nem. con."
 
2013-02-18 04:10:21 AM

hubiestubert: Uchiha_Cycliste: hubiestubert: I'm a chef. For me, this is professional development. You work with great chefs, you learn from every gig you have. Worked for some greats, worked with some nationally known names, worked with the NHL, and worked with local greats. Learning regional cuisines isn't about just reading, but in the sampling, of seeing the differences in styles up close. It also helps to see differences in operations from varied perspectives. From smaller joints, large venues, banquet houses, and corporate gigs. Every job adds experience, and gives you a deeper understanding of the business. Even Mom and Pop operations. The last five years, I've seen haute cuisine, sports entertainment with the Phoenix Coyotes, a failed attempt to franchise by a Denver sports bar--failures are instructive--as well as fine cuisine with the Deerfield Inn, and the Mom and Pop place that I'm at now. Mind you, Christopher's was only about four months, and it was enough. FuNuGyz only lasted three months before the management folded, and I spent two and a half years with Aramark with the Arena. The Inn got asploded thanks to Irene, and that has led me to the gig I'm at now. All of them are instructional, and all of them build a resume with varied experience. For chefs, that is important. Some like to specialize, but that's for insects in my book. I can do BBQ, I can do fine dining, I can ethnic, I can do New American, and more. That gives a breadth of knowledge that is necessary to run kitchens, and run them efficiently.

That sounds pretty awesome (professionally). I hadn't considered a possibility like that, So, you had many experiences and adventures all around and about. Let's imagine that you could have had all the same cooking and restaurant experiences but all in the same region. How do you think your experiences and outlooks been shaped by the fact these jobs *were* all over and not in a single area.

I've been in and around Western Mass for some time. I know chefs and dis ...


sounds like a lot of fun
 
2013-02-18 04:21:56 AM

hubiestubert: tinfoil-hat maggie: ciberido: hubiestubert: Rusty Cundieff did a bit about this on TV Nation, and he bought the last legal slaves...

[img805.imageshack.us image 560x371]

Well sure if you have a dollar to spare ; )
Just a song ; )

I do like the fact that he wished his boys well, after they had to be let go. "There goes one happy white boy..."

/If you want to hit up holidays, there's always The Dollyrots...


LoL, I'm just drinking but I liked that song here's another ; )
 
2013-02-18 04:27:19 AM

tinfoil-hat maggie: hubiestubert: tinfoil-hat maggie: ciberido: hubiestubert: Rusty Cundieff did a bit about this on TV Nation, and he bought the last legal slaves...

[img805.imageshack.us image 560x371]

Well sure if you have a dollar to spare ; )
Just a song ; )

I do like the fact that he wished his boys well, after they had to be let go. "There goes one happy white boy..."

/If you want to hit up holidays, there's always The Dollyrots...

LoL, I'm just drinking but I liked that song here's another ; )


Maybe this will work sorry about the other well maybe ; ) Oh yea and all songs may have NSFW language.
 
2013-02-18 04:47:55 AM

Rufus Lee King: Good Lord, yet another race-baiting, white-people-are-evil thread on FARK? Amazing

P.S. I grew up in Mississippi. Did any of you? It's not like it's portrayed on "The Simpsons", or whatever. Goddamned racists.Seriously.


My mother was born and raised in Ebeneezer, and I spent more than a few summers there. I know backwoo--ahem, "rural" Mississippi isn't nearly as bad as it is portrayed, but Louisiana isn't either. Everybody thinks New Orleans is nothing but gumbo-drinking illiterate idiots who celebrate Mardi Gras all year long. Not even close to the truth: it's only about half of us.

But jebus the portrayals of Mississippi are accurate for some of the population. When it was revealed my great-uncle had an extramarital affair and a child with a black woman, you could hear the shotguns getting racked...
 
2013-02-18 04:54:24 AM
MisterTweak:

Much of the anti-government sentiment in the south can probably be traced to the face that so much of government in the south is fundamentally corrupt, in an open and brazen manner, and many voters who consider themselves republican might well be voting to re-elect Rick Perry and similar crooks on the theory that with democrats, there would simply be more crooks. If your only experience with government is with people like George Wallace, Rick Perry, and George W. Bush, and whatever the urine-sample guy in FL's name is, you'd probably assume (with some justification) that the only hope to limit the level of thievery is to limit the number of thieves.

I have never thought about this! This is very insightful. Thanks for this comment.
 
2013-02-18 04:57:08 AM

quatchi: hubiestubert: The worst critics of the South, they aren't the folks who have never been, but those who have lived and breathed in these lands, who have red clay baked into their souls, and who understand her; her waters, her forests, her rivers and streams, and loving her, want her to rise above the years and come out better. Freer. Who understand her potential, the depth of her people, and still recognize that there is a long way to go to making her live up to that potential.

Racism isn't alone responsible for the conditions in the South, it is a symptom of a rot deep in the halls of power, and exploited and nursed along, to give folks something to point to as a reason. You can love the South and acknowledge that. You can love a place, and a people, and still have eyes open on her faults and her challenges.

[audienceclapping.gif]

Seriously, well done.

/Dammit, now I want a Mint julep, southern fried steak and grits.
//And I don't even know what grits are.
///They might be illegal in Canada or something, never seen 'em on a menu.


1. It's chicken-fried steak, and it is biggest in Texas. Still goddamned awesome though, just needs the right gravy.

2. Grits--holy god. It's essentially ground-up corn (cornmeal). I've heard it compared to polenta, but real grits, in my humble opinion, need butter (REAL butter, thanks) and cheddar cheese.
 
fdr
2013-02-18 05:40:34 AM

Rufus Lee King: Let me reiterate: I grew up in Mississippi and the white population was NOT the problem.


Rufus Lee King (if that is your real name), your's is the dumbest post I've ever read in my life. You really are from Mississippi.
 
2013-02-18 05:53:27 AM

maram500: 1. It's chicken-fried steak, and it is biggest in Texas. Still goddamned awesome though, just needs the right gravy.


Yum!

2. Grits--holy god. It's essentially ground-up corn (cornmeal). I've heard it compared to polenta, but real grits, in my humble opinion, need butter (REAL butter, thanks) and cheddar cheese.

Margarine is an abomination and it's use in cooking makes Baby Jesus cry.
 
2013-02-18 07:14:29 AM

quatchi: maram500: 1. It's chicken-fried steak, and it is biggest in Texas. Still goddamned awesome though, just needs the right gravy.

Yum!

2. Grits--holy god. It's essentially ground-up corn (cornmeal). I've heard it compared to polenta, but real grits, in my humble opinion, need butter (REAL butter, thanks) and cheddar cheese.

Margarine is an abomination and it's use in cooking makes Baby Jesus cry.


Scallions also make the Baby Jesus cry.

/Why ruin something as divine as shrimp and grits with a garnish of scallions?
//Sometimes Food Network goes too far...
 
2013-02-18 08:25:11 AM

Bastard Toadflax: quatchi: Mississippi? Learning?

That would make a good movie title.


Fiction.
 
2013-02-18 08:31:14 AM
So, how about the 17th, 21st, 23rd, 24th, 26th, and 27th?
 
2013-02-18 09:29:33 AM
I find it interesting that no one thought to ask this until now.

What could possibly have happened in recent history to inspire people to go over the ratification of the 13th amendment with a fine tooth comb?

Things that make you go hmmmm...
 
2013-02-18 09:34:46 AM

tinfoil-hat maggie: tinfoil-hat maggie: hubiestubert: tinfoil-hat maggie: ciberido: hubiestubert: Rusty Cundieff did a bit about this on TV Nation, and he bought the last legal slaves...

[img805.imageshack.us image 560x371]

Well sure if you have a dollar to spare ; )
Just a song ; )

I do like the fact that he wished his boys well, after they had to be let go. "There goes one happy white boy..."

/If you want to hit up holidays, there's always The Dollyrots...

LoL, I'm just drinking but I liked that song here's another ; )

Maybe this will work sorry about the other well maybe ; ) Oh yea and all songs may have NSFW language.


Heh. Maybe a bit more towards the Appalachias, and certainly more Old Skool, but I am sucker for the classics, and the dangers of strong drink.

And a hope that a gal didn't wake up in this condition...
 
2013-02-18 09:42:42 AM

hubiestubert: Some like to specialize, but that's for insects in my book.


Heinlein fan...
 
2013-02-18 09:54:41 AM

Shaggy_C: I bet most states haven't passed a law banning the quartering of troops in peacetime, either. The supremacy clause kind of got that federal versus state question pretty well settled.


All thirteen original states ratified the ban on quartering of troops in peacetime. Every state to join the union since has joined knowing of its existence. Mississippi's refusal to ratify the 13th Amendment is shameful.
 
2013-02-18 10:47:37 AM

DamnYankees: I didn't think any Southern state ratified the 13th amendment, as it was passed without them.


According to the article the amendment only received the three-fourths majority it needed to pass when Georgia ratified it in 1865. Unless you want to argue that Georgia is not a Southern state?
 
2013-02-18 10:52:29 AM

thenumber5: but anyways, as some who is from Mississippi and lived everywhere else. Mississippi is no worse then any where else in country once you get out side of there "Cultural center"

People kinda of forget about the Gulf Coast that is basically New Orleans on the beach


One of the more memorable posts I remember from a while back was someone claiming Urban Cowboy was basically a documentary of 70's Pasadena. Given the way my dad and his family grew up, I could believe it.
 
2013-02-18 01:21:57 PM

AverageAmericanGuy: The 3/5 thing did not comment on or define the personhood of slaves, it only described how slaves would be counted for the purpose of determining representation.  Saying that we're counting 60% of a group for census purposes is not the same thing as saying "they're only partially people".

While it may not be your intention to reduce the personhood of a group, by creating laws that treats them as lesser beings, you automatically create a system that keeps them under the thumb of the "real" citizens.

See what  Surat Al-Baqarah 2:282 has done to women in Islamic countries.


The nice thing is that 'reducing the personhood' (I still disagree with that characterization of the 3/5 thing) actually weakened the slave states.  If we consider full representation as "fully honoring their personhood", it was the slave states that wanted this, and they definitely didn't want this for the benefit of the slaves.  Surely we don't think that the slave states were the good guys in terms of human rights vis-a-vis slavery because they wanted all their slaves counted, do we?  Counting 100% of the slaves would have only served to strenghten the slave states.

It was the free states, which are largely viewed as the good guys in terms of slavery and human rights that DID NOT want the slaves counted all.

If we assume that the 3/5 compromise="slaves were 3/5 of a person", then this means the free states were terrible because they wanted 0/5 of the slave counted ie., slaves weren't people, while the slave states were nice humanitarians because they wanted all slaves 'treated as whole persons' (5/5 of a person)

When you look at it like this, any kind of complaining or lamenting about the 3/5 compromise is misguided and woefully uninformed.
 
2013-02-18 04:52:12 PM
Or you could look at it in a more reasonable way:

The south wanted slaves. The north did not. The south is the clear loser on morality here.

The north wanted to limit the amount of additional power the south could grab as a result of their slave population. The south wanted to exploit them further and gain representation as a result of having slaves. Once again the south is the clear loser.

The less slaves counted for here, the less power the southern slaveowners had, and therefore it would be in the slaves' best interests to be counted as 0.

Beyond that, blacks in the south SHOULD have been counted as full people, because they SHOULD have been free, so the 3/5s compromise is still the fault of the south for having slaves in the first place. There is still plenty of room to lament that they could not be given full representation as human beings in the country, and the fault still lies with the supporters of slavery.
 
2013-02-18 08:21:52 PM

hubiestubert: tinfoil-hat maggie: ciberido: hubiestubert: Rusty Cundieff did a bit about this on TV Nation, and he bought the last legal slaves...

[img805.imageshack.us image 560x371]

Well sure if you have a dollar to spare ; )
Just a song ; )

I do like the fact that he wished his boys well, after they had to be let go. "There goes one happy white boy..."

/If you want to hit up holidays, there's always The Dollyrots...


You people are weird.
 
2013-02-18 08:59:01 PM
 
2013-02-18 09:37:07 PM

ciberido: You people are weird.


encrypted-tbn2.gstatic.com

/I was just enjoying libations ; )
 
2013-02-18 10:00:35 PM

tinfoil-hat maggie: I was just enjoying libations ; )


Carry on then.

I'd have added "my wayward son" but this is Mississippi not Kansas, we're talking about.  Plus the whole "son vs daughter" thing.
 
2013-02-18 10:10:06 PM

ciberido: tinfoil-hat maggie: I was just enjoying libations ; )

Carry on then.

I'd have added "my wayward son" but this is Mississippi not Kansas, we're talking about.  Plus the whole "son vs daughter" thing.


I see what what you mean and will there be peace when I'm done??
 
2013-02-18 10:38:59 PM

tinfoil-hat maggie: ciberido: tinfoil-hat maggie: I was just enjoying libations ; )

Carry on then.

I'd have added "my wayward son" but this is Mississippi not Kansas, we're talking about.  Plus the whole "son vs daughter" thing.

I see what what you mean and will there be peace when I'm done??


Sadly, my Grandma's home state just can't quite compete... not in the same scale at least...
 
2013-02-18 11:39:02 PM

hubiestubert: tinfoil-hat maggie: ciberido: tinfoil-hat maggie: I was just enjoying libations ; )

Carry on then.

I'd have added "my wayward son" but this is Mississippi not Kansas, we're talking about.  Plus the whole "son vs daughter" thing.

I see what what you mean and will there be peace when I'm done??

Sadly, my Grandma's home state just can't quite compete... not in the same scale at least...


Nice though, something from my adopted home state : )
 
2013-02-18 11:46:04 PM

tinfoil-hat maggie: hubiestubert: tinfoil-hat maggie: ciberido: tinfoil-hat maggie: I was just enjoying libations ; )

Carry on then.

I'd have added "my wayward son" but this is Mississippi not Kansas, we're talking about.  Plus the whole "son vs daughter" thing.

I see what what you mean and will there be peace when I'm done??

Sadly, my Grandma's home state just can't quite compete... not in the same scale at least...

Nice though, something from my adopted home state : )


Robbie Fulks gives a shout out to the state, not the band, in his ode to North Carolina...
 
2013-02-18 11:59:08 PM
LoL : ) Now I want a smoke : P
 
2013-02-19 12:04:26 AM

tinfoil-hat maggie: LoL : ) Now I want a smoke : P


Sadly, so do I. Gave it up a while back, but every now and then, I get reminded that I do like the stuff. Worked a tobacco farm in college for a couple of seasons even. Fine shade tobacco for cigar roller leaf. It was odd to be transported back to that sort of agricultural base up here, but the curing barns are awful similar to those back South...
 
2013-02-19 01:11:26 AM

hubiestubert: tinfoil-hat maggie: LoL : ) Now I want a smoke : P

Sadly, so do I. Gave it up a while back, but every now and then, I get reminded that I do like the stuff. Worked a tobacco farm in college for a couple of seasons even. Fine shade tobacco for cigar roller leaf. It was odd to be transported back to that sort of agricultural base up here, but the curing barns are awful similar to those back South...


Good for you I'm back and forth right now and mostly back. Quitting seems to get harder the more times you do it.
Oh and csb on the tobacco farming : )
 
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