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(CNN)   "Hi, I'm Dan. I heard you guys need a ride. Let's get out of here," says man who just jumped into the ocean from a perfectly good helicopter. In a hurricane   (cnn.com) divider line 46
    More: Hero, reward website, self-incriminations, rescue beacons, New London, willful violation, Fifth Amendment, nightmares  
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14003 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Feb 2013 at 2:19 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



46 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2013-02-17 02:11:16 PM  
You know what's better than being rescued by brave people?  Using modern communications and radar to prevent sailing into a storm in a 18th century replica boat and risking lives to begin with.  I am sure the Air Force pilots that risk their lives to give you all the information you need to get out of the way, appreciate being ignored.
 
2013-02-17 02:28:07 PM  
"   Floating in a life raft with Hurricane Sandy raging around them, the crew of the HMS Bounty remained surprisingly calm and even told jokes after their ship rolled them into the Atlantic, survivors said. "

Guess you had to be there . . .
 
2013-02-17 02:29:07 PM  

lack of warmth: You know what's better than being rescued by brave people?  Using modern communications and radar to prevent sailing into a storm in a 18th century replica boat and risking lives to begin with.  I am sure the Air Force pilots that risk their lives to give you all the information you need to get out of the way, appreciate being ignored.


/I hear you, but shiat happens bro. Glad that there are brave women and men out there to save your stupid ass should something happen to you.

//Raises glass to the hero's .
///Salute'
 
2013-02-17 02:29:22 PM  
Replica? So it's only a model?
 
2013-02-17 02:30:43 PM  
At least the captain had the good sense to go down with the ship after his egregiously bad judgment, unlike a certain Italian captain I could name.
 
2013-02-17 02:35:43 PM  

lack of warmth: You know what's better than being rescued by brave people?  Using modern communications and radar to prevent sailing into a storm in a 18th century replica boat and risking lives to begin with.  I am sure the Air Force pilots that risk their lives to give you all the information you need to get out of the way, appreciate being ignored.



farm9.staticflickr.com

"All right, I'm saying it. Why is he even here? He's just a guy who landed a plane in a river to save his own ass. You want to be a real hero? Avoid the geese like all the other pilots do...Every. Single. Day!"
 
2013-02-17 02:37:20 PM  

lack of warmth: You know what's better than being rescued by brave people?  Using modern communications and radar to prevent sailing into a storm in a 18th century replica boat and risking lives to begin with.  I am sure the Air Force pilots that risk their lives to give you all the information you need to get out of the way, appreciate being ignored.


You sound fat.
 
2013-02-17 02:38:07 PM  

calbert: lack of warmth: You know what's better than being rescued by brave people?  Using modern communications and radar to prevent sailing into a storm in a 18th century replica boat and risking lives to begin with.  I am sure the Air Force pilots that risk their lives to give you all the information you need to get out of the way, appreciate being ignored.


[farm9.staticflickr.com image 517x293]

"All right, I'm saying it. Why is he even here? He's just a guy who landed a plane in a river to save his own ass. You want to be a real hero? Avoid the geese like all the other pilots do...Every. Single. Day!"


A smart man is one who can get out of a difficult situation. A wise man is one who knows how not to get into it.
 
2013-02-17 02:40:38 PM  

lack of warmth: You know what's better than being rescued by brave people?  Using modern communications and radar to prevent sailing into a storm in a 18th century replica boat and risking lives to begin with.  I am sure the Air Force pilots that risk their lives to give you all the information you need to get out of the way, appreciate being ignored.



Before the ship set sail from New London, the crew was very aware of the approaching hurricane, Cleveland said. Walbridge gathered them for a meeting in which he "mentioned his experience with hurricanes and he said if anybody wanted to leave there would be no hard feelings, no begrudging."

"I believed him," said Cleveland, who was then asked if the crew were offered paid expenses home. "In my experience, if you choose to leave, you would have to find your own way home."

"Nobody decided to leave," Cleveland said.

Walbridge said he wanted to "make tracks" to the south and east as fast as possible, Cleveland said, so the vessel could position itself to get the best winds from Sandy.

The captain believed, Cleveland said, that his ship would be safer riding Sandy out at sea, instead of waiting for the storm to hit them in New London. Cleveland said he agreed with that point of view, but there were also good arguments to remain in port.


Bounty first mate John Svendsen testified Tuesday that Walbridge wasn't chasing Sandy, but the captain had said "the ship was safer at sea."

Personally I think that the owner has brought in right to not self incriminate = someone valued property far more than people.  But they knew the f--king hurricane was there.
 
2013-02-17 02:43:50 PM  
What I'm curious about is the decision to move the boat south and around the hurricane.  Most recreational boaters moved further up the New England coast, or maybe into the Canadian Maritimes if they were really paranoid, to avoid having their boat wrecked when Sandy made landfall.  Whereas supposedly the Bounty was under pressure from its owners to reach Florida and open as a winter tourist attraction.

Basically it seems as if the captain of the bounty decided to act like he was a naval vessel or a commercial cargo vessel where is it the norm to go out to sea and ride out storms, as opposed to acting like the overgrown sailboat he was and get the fark out of there.  How much of it was the captain's decision versus ownership pressure seems worth asking about.
 
2013-02-17 02:48:53 PM  
Saw the whole story & rescue on The Weather Channel about a month ago. This is OLD news. Yawn.
 
2013-02-17 02:51:22 PM  
Buy a Coastie a drink. They're awesome people
 
2013-02-17 02:52:45 PM  
  check out the story of the "St.Patrick"....a crab boat out of Kodiak,Ak.   December 1981..monster winter storm and due to water in the bilge,the Captain orders abandon ship....out of 11 crew members,there were only two survivors......the boat never sank.
 
2013-02-17 02:54:58 PM  

logicalman: Saw the whole story & rescue on The Weather Channel about a month ago. This is OLD news. Yawn.


The hearing isn't.
 
2013-02-17 02:55:56 PM  

AcesFull: check out the story of the "St.Patrick"....a crab boat out of Kodiak,Ak.   December 1981..monster winter storm and due to water in the bilge,the Captain orders abandon ship....out of 11 crew members,there were only two survivors......the boat never sank.


That's only part of the story, you left out the part where the boat capsized.  Eventually she did right herself, but she was 90 degrees gone when the crew left.
 
2013-02-17 02:57:02 PM  
While 50 mph winds and 30 ft waves aren't a barrel of laughs, they're pretty common in the Atlantic. Wouldn't a boat the size of the Bounty be expected to ride out the storm just like a commercial vessel?

Did they try to sail through it rather than furling the sails?
 
2013-02-17 03:04:34 PM  

ha-ha-guy: AcesFull: check out the story of the "St.Patrick"....a crab boat out of Kodiak,Ak.   December 1981..monster winter storm and due to water in the bilge,the Captain orders abandon ship....out of 11 crew members,there were only two survivors......the boat never sank.

That's only part of the story, you left out the part where the boat capsized.  Eventually she did right herself, but she was 90 degrees gone when the crew left.


 wow...I did not know that...Now my whole memory of that is suspect...I believe there were two female crew members who were lost...I found that odd because most boats at that time had,usually,one female cook..if that...Also,I believe,at that time,it was the largest maritime lawsuit ever brought...Seems like the captain was not fully licensed..
  thank you for the additional fix...
 
2013-02-17 03:06:27 PM  
StreetlightInTheGhetto:

Personally I think that the owner has brought in right to not self incriminate = someone valued property far more than people.  But they knew the f--king hurricane was there.

I think it's a case of crazy boat people who were more worried that their beloved Bounty replica might suffer damage riding out a hurricane in port than the part where "Hey, we could all drown."
 
2013-02-17 03:09:07 PM  

Tiiba: Replica? So it's only a model?


It wasn't to scale - it was actually 20% larger than the original Bounty. So...

torwars.com
 
2013-02-17 03:11:07 PM  

AcesFull: ha-ha-guy: AcesFull: check out the story of the "St.Patrick"....a crab boat out of Kodiak,Ak.   December 1981..monster winter storm and due to water in the bilge,the Captain orders abandon ship....out of 11 crew members,there were only two survivors......the boat never sank.

That's only part of the story, you left out the part where the boat capsized.  Eventually she did right herself, but she was 90 degrees gone when the crew left.

 wow...I did not know that...Now my whole memory of that is suspect...I believe there were two female crew members who were lost...I found that odd because most boats at that time had,usually,one female cook..if that...Also,I believe,at that time,it was the largest maritime lawsuit ever brought...Seems like the captain was not fully licensed..
  thank you for the additional fix...


let me rephrase that..largest maritime lawsuit in Alaska..at that time.
 
2013-02-17 03:17:24 PM  

AcesFull: let me rephrase that..largest maritime lawsuit in Alaska..at that time.


The whole thing with that boat sounded sketchy as hell.  Only one life raft, which was lost when the boat tipped, no backup life capsules.  Also supposedly speculation that the boat was loaded improperly which made it prone to tipping.  Loaded so badly that once a bunch of shiat fell off the deck it was actually able to right itself.
 
2013-02-17 03:18:48 PM  
I don't know why the Coast Guard is constantly mocked. I'd love to see just one of the people who dismiss them try the stunt described in TFA. While you're sitting at your desk doing signal intel, some guy is doing something like TFA. So STFU.
 
2013-02-17 03:23:57 PM  

dickfreckle: I don't know why the Coast Guard is constantly mocked. I'd love to see just one of the people who dismiss them try the stunt described in TFA. While you're sitting at your desk doing signal intel, some guy is doing something like TFA. So STFU.


And even better is that they can keep their sense of humor while doing that.
 
2013-02-17 03:27:02 PM  

dickfreckle: I don't know why the Coast Guard is constantly mocked. I'd love to see just one of the people who dismiss them try the stunt described in TFA. While you're sitting at your desk doing signal intel, some guy is doing something like TFA. So STFU.


Calm down killer.
 
2013-02-17 03:28:21 PM  

ha-ha-guy: AcesFull: let me rephrase that..largest maritime lawsuit in Alaska..at that time.

The whole thing with that boat sounded sketchy as hell.  Only one life raft, which was lost when the boat tipped, no backup life capsules.  Also supposedly speculation that the boat was loaded improperly which made it prone to tipping.  Loaded so badly that once a bunch of shiat fell off the deck it was actually able to right itself.



  yes....the two survivors had the only two immersion suits.
 
2013-02-17 03:35:27 PM  

Seacop: dickfreckle: I don't know why the Coast Guard is constantly mocked. I'd love to see just one of the people who dismiss them try the stunt described in TFA. While you're sitting at your desk doing signal intel, some guy is doing something like TFA. So STFU.

Calm down killer.


Yes, simmer down there hard charger.

I did just about everything I could to be horribly maimed/killed by the military (enlisted/deployed for route clearance as a combat engineer), but I have nothing but respect for the Coasties.

While most of the military is either training (most of the time) or deploying to combat (occasionally), the Coast Guard are  always doing their job.  If I had to pick a branch that I wanted to spend a career in, it would be the Coast Guard purely because their job has meaning beyond  a force in readiness 24/7.
 
2013-02-17 03:39:20 PM  
Bless the Coasties, wanted to join, but wasn't tall enough.

Back then, you had to be over six foot tall.

That way you could walk back to shore . . . .


Go Navy.
 
2013-02-17 03:46:32 PM  
If you want to read about guys with giant cojones, do a little research on PJs/Rescue Swimmers....
 
2013-02-17 03:50:23 PM  
You could always tell if someone was a rescue swimmer by the loud clanking sound they make when they walk.

/retired Navy
//AWs for the win
 
2013-02-17 03:51:14 PM  
I hope he did this with the James Bond theme playing nearby.
 
2013-02-17 04:01:57 PM  
"We all thought we were going to drown again," remembered Groves. Instead, they swam out of the raft and held on to the outside
Well that was a much better plan, indeed.
 
2013-02-17 04:03:41 PM  

StreetlightInTheGhetto: lack of warmth: You know what's better than being rescued by brave people?  Using modern communications and radar to prevent sailing into a storm in a 18th century replica boat and risking lives to begin with.  I am sure the Air Force pilots that risk their lives to give you all the information you need to get out of the way, appreciate being ignored.


Before the ship set sail from New London, the crew was very aware of the approaching hurricane, Cleveland said. Walbridge gathered them for a meeting in which he "mentioned his experience with hurricanes and he said if anybody wanted to leave there would be no hard feelings, no begrudging."

"I believed him," said Cleveland, who was then asked if the crew were offered paid expenses home. "In my experience, if you choose to leave, you would have to find your own way home."

"Nobody decided to leave," Cleveland said.

Walbridge said he wanted to "make tracks" to the south and east as fast as possible, Cleveland said, so the vessel could position itself to get the best winds from Sandy.

The captain believed, Cleveland said, that his ship would be safer riding Sandy out at sea, instead of waiting for the storm to hit them in New London. Cleveland said he agreed with that point of view, but there were also good arguments to remain in port.

Bounty first mate John Svendsen testified Tuesday that Walbridge wasn't chasing Sandy, but the captain had said "the ship was safer at sea."

Personally I think that the owner has brought in right to not self incriminate = someone valued property far more than people.  But they knew the f--king hurricane was there.


That doesn't change the point that they ignored modern good logic.  Because, hey we can save the ship, oh wait, two died and the ship was still lost.  Being fully informed stupid is still stupid.  Several people went into the storm, some went to save a boat, others went to save the first group, which group do I appreciate?
 
2013-02-17 04:05:38 PM  

lack of warmth: StreetlightInTheGhetto: lack of warmth: You know what's better than being rescued by brave people?  Using modern communications and radar to prevent sailing into a storm in a 18th century replica boat and risking lives to begin with.  I am sure the Air Force pilots that risk their lives to give you all the information you need to get out of the way, appreciate being ignored.


Before the ship set sail from New London, the crew was very aware of the approaching hurricane, Cleveland said. Walbridge gathered them for a meeting in which he "mentioned his experience with hurricanes and he said if anybody wanted to leave there would be no hard feelings, no begrudging."

"I believed him," said Cleveland, who was then asked if the crew were offered paid expenses home. "In my experience, if you choose to leave, you would have to find your own way home."

"Nobody decided to leave," Cleveland said.

Walbridge said he wanted to "make tracks" to the south and east as fast as possible, Cleveland said, so the vessel could position itself to get the best winds from Sandy.

The captain believed, Cleveland said, that his ship would be safer riding Sandy out at sea, instead of waiting for the storm to hit them in New London. Cleveland said he agreed with that point of view, but there were also good arguments to remain in port.

Bounty first mate John Svendsen testified Tuesday that Walbridge wasn't chasing Sandy, but the captain had said "the ship was safer at sea."

Personally I think that the owner has brought in right to not self incriminate = someone valued property far more than people.  But they knew the f--king hurricane was there.

That doesn't change the point that they ignored modern good logic.  Because, hey we can save the ship, oh wait, two died and the ship was still lost.  Being fully informed stupid is still stupid.  Several people went into the storm, some went to save a boat, others went to save the first group, which group do I appreciate?


Neither, because you're a jerk either way?
 
2013-02-17 04:15:51 PM  
So after losing their captain and 2 fellow crew members they sang sea shanties and told jokes?

"Why wouldn't Natalie Wood shower on her yacht?


She preferred to wash up on shore."
 
2013-02-17 04:22:43 PM  

ha-ha-guy: AcesFull: let me rephrase that..largest maritime lawsuit in Alaska..at that time.

The whole thing with that boat sounded sketchy as hell.  Only one life raft, which was lost when the boat tipped, no backup life capsules.  Also supposedly speculation that the boat was loaded improperly which made it prone to tipping.  Loaded so badly that once a bunch of shiat fell off the deck it was actually able to right itself.


My understanding is that used to be pretty common with commercial fishing boats...might still be.

Naval architect does his fancy weight and balance calculations, then the owner/operator stacks twenty tons of gear ten feet above the balance point...get a little topside ice on top of that, over you go.
 
2013-02-17 04:32:32 PM  

PunGent: ha-ha-guy: AcesFull: let me rephrase that..largest maritime lawsuit in Alaska..at that time.

The whole thing with that boat sounded sketchy as hell.  Only one life raft, which was lost when the boat tipped, no backup life capsules.  Also supposedly speculation that the boat was loaded improperly which made it prone to tipping.  Loaded so badly that once a bunch of shiat fell off the deck it was actually able to right itself.

My understanding is that used to be pretty common with commercial fishing boats...might still be.

Naval architect does his fancy weight and balance calculations, then the owner/operator stacks twenty tons of gear ten feet above the balance point...get a little topside ice on top of that, over you go.


    that one reality show about the Alaskan fishing..(??)   I believe they claim that crab fishing in the Bering Sea is the worlds' #1 most dangerous occupation....I could believe that,especially when they start loading filled crab pots on board...
 
2013-02-17 04:47:14 PM  
sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net
 
M-G
2013-02-17 04:49:35 PM  

Tiiba: Replica? So it's only a model?


The principles are the same!
images.hitfix.com
 
2013-02-17 05:33:59 PM  
(Sometimes I feel like) Fletcher Christian

/Well, we took drugs and tore our uniforms, and gave our captain up to the sea.
 
2013-02-17 06:02:48 PM  

eggrolls: Tiiba: Replica? So it's only a model?

It wasn't to scale - it was actually 20% larger than the original Bounty. So...

[torwars.com image 500x376]


So, 1.2:1 scale model? Nice.
 
2013-02-17 06:57:23 PM  

lack of warmth: You know what's better than being rescued by brave people?  Using modern communications and radar to prevent sailing into a storm in a 18th century replica boat and risking lives to begin with.  I am sure the Air Force pilots that risk their lives to give you all the information you need to get out of the way, appreciate being ignored.


20/20 hindsight is a wonderful thing. You should go tell FDR not to trust Stalin at Yalta, it will work out much better.
 
2013-02-17 07:05:21 PM  

Nothing To See Here: Bless the Coasties, wanted to join, but wasn't tall enough.

Back then, you had to be over six foot tall.

That way you could walk back to shore . . . .


Go Navy.


Ha,was thinking along the same line. What's the difference between the Navy and the Coast Guard? In the Navy, if your ship sinks, you have to swim to shore. In the Coast Guard you can just walk back.

Fair Winds and Following Seas, good sir.

/nothing but love for the Coasties
//all 47 of them, especially those 3 hot chicks
///I keed, i keed
 
2013-02-17 11:13:11 PM  

dickfreckle: I don't know why the Coast Guard is constantly mocked. I'd love to see just one of the people who dismiss them try the stunt described in TFA. While you're sitting at your desk doing signal intel, some guy is doing something like TFA. So STFU.


I don't tell a good story so I suck...
csb
 I used to work as an armed guard at large federal facility. The guy who worked the main entrance was active Coast Guard and this was his p/t job. The marines (no capitalization for these boys) who were stationed their used to bust his balls hard core (no puns, no puns). Like make his life hell. So I went up there and gave them pure hell one day. Reminded them that the Coast Guard did drug interdiction and saved lives for a living.  And all they did was shuffle paper and thank god they were not around 'real' Marines. Never had to go back to talk with them.  I was in the guard at the time, 95B in an infantry unit and did over 9 years active. I'm pretty good at the inter-service rivalry ball busting thing. /csb
 
2013-02-17 11:34:34 PM  

Nothing To See Here: Bless the Coasties, wanted to join, but wasn't tall enough.

Back then, you had to be over six foot tall.

That way you could walk back to shore . . . .


Go Navy.


Yeah the deepest water I've ever been in is your wife's bathtub.
 
2013-02-18 07:39:40 AM  
My son just passed his PST to go to AIRR (Aviation Air Rescue Swimmer).  He starts boot in April.  All I can say is he's nuts but kudos to him for wanting to do a job that few can or want to do.
 
2013-02-18 09:36:30 AM  

The WindowLicker: Seacop: dickfreckle: I don't know why the Coast Guard is constantly mocked. I'd love to see just one of the people who dismiss them try the stunt described in TFA. While you're sitting at your desk doing signal intel, some guy is doing something like TFA. So STFU.

Calm down killer.

Yes, simmer down there hard charger.

I did just about everything I could to be horribly maimed/killed by the military (enlisted/deployed for route clearance as a combat engineer), but I have nothing but respect for the Coasties.

While most of the military is either training (most of the time) or deploying to combat (occasionally), the Coast Guard are  always doing their job.  If I had to pick a branch that I wanted to spend a career in, it would be the Coast Guard purely because their job has meaning beyond  a force in readiness 24/7.


I did it.  Best job I ever had.  Best.   Saved a whale and 14 tourists.  Not all at once, though.
 
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