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(NYPost)   Redemption: Collecting cans and bottles for the deposit is tough work, and the number of people in NYC collecting cans for money has seemingly doubled in the last 2 years   (nypost.com) divider line 75
    More: Interesting, Don't Bother, soda-lime glasses, Central American  
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4357 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Feb 2013 at 1:10 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-17 12:02:41 PM  
At least you have deposit redemption to work with. Here in Texas there are people fishing for the cans for weight value and it's about 30 cans to the pound.
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2013-02-17 12:08:00 PM  
Don't bother with two-liter bottles. They take up as much space as half a dozen cans and are still only worth 5 cents.

This suggests a compromise in the bottle bill expansion debate: Double the rate for large bottles, keep it 5 cents for under a liter.

But I haven't seen a problem with discarded bottles of any size in my area. The combination of 5 cent scavengers, recycling bins, and city street cleaning does the job.
 
2013-02-17 12:16:31 PM  

wildcardjack: At least you have deposit redemption to work with. Here in Texas there are people fishing for the cans for weight value and it's about 30 cans to the pound.


Its sad that even Mexico has more forward thinking container recycling than Texas.
 
2013-02-17 01:10:30 PM  
*Seinfeld-Newman.jpg*
 
2013-02-17 01:14:45 PM  

unyon: wildcardjack: At least you have deposit redemption to work with. Here in Texas there are people fishing for the cans for weight value and it's about 30 cans to the pound.

Its sad that even Mexico has more forward thinking container recycling than Texas.


Texas elected Ted Cruz to the US Senate.
 
2013-02-17 01:17:46 PM  
Höchsten Heiles Wunder!
Erlösung dem Erlöser!
 
2013-02-17 01:20:49 PM  
The can guys love these i.imgur.com
 
2013-02-17 01:21:40 PM  
Time to borrow the mail truck and head up to Michigan
 
2013-02-17 01:23:25 PM  
FTFA "You have to set up relationships with the superintendents and the porters of the high-rise building," she says. "There's a schedule of when each block and section have to put out their recyclables. I don't spend time walking around the streets."

Thankfully I live in an apartment building that locks up the garbage and recycling containers indoors and doesn't have a porter to bribe.
 
2013-02-17 01:25:46 PM  
My house is almost paid off. I'll sell it and move in with my relatives before I'd pick garbage to make ends meet.
 
2013-02-17 01:26:40 PM  

gingerjet: Thankfully I live in an apartment building that locks up the garbage and recycling containers indoors and doesn't have a porter to bribe.


I have to ask- Why does it matter?  Regardless of how recycling gets to depot, isn't it mission accomplished from your perspective?
 
2013-02-17 01:28:25 PM  
The Obama economy?
 
2013-02-17 01:32:07 PM  
I like to call them "gleaners", and we have a few regulars in my neighborhood near Beantown. One's an old wizened Chinese woman, one's a big black guy, and one's a really skinny scruffy white dude. It's a lifestyle that welcomes all kinds.
 
2013-02-17 01:34:57 PM  

ZAZ: This suggests a compromise in the bottle bill expansion debate: Double the rate for large bottles, keep it 5 cents for under a liter.


I think they should up it to 25 cents for everything. Soda was like 50 cents a bottle back when the 5 cent deposit was enacted. More incentive to keep the damn bottles off the street.
 
2013-02-17 01:35:39 PM  
www.cawrecycles.org
 
2013-02-17 01:36:23 PM  

unyon: gingerjet: Thankfully I live in an apartment building that locks up the garbage and recycling containers indoors and doesn't have a porter to bribe.

I have to ask- Why does it matter?  Regardless of how recycling gets to depot, isn't it mission accomplished from your perspective?


we have bins in our neighborhood and every recycling day the homeless people roll through with their shopping carts and baby strollers full of cans and they will yell at each other, get in fights, and knock bins over just to be the first to get the Red Bull can in my bin. At the height of the problem there were homeless people camping out on the lawns or in carports to get a leg up on their friends. It's honestly at the point where most people don't bother recycling anymore in our complex.

/have nothing against the homeless
 
2013-02-17 01:36:45 PM  

unyon: gingerjet: Thankfully I live in an apartment building that locks up the garbage and recycling containers indoors and doesn't have a porter to bribe.

I have to ask- Why does it matter?  Regardless of how recycling gets to depot, isn't it mission accomplished from your perspective?


He is is possibly a ginger or a troll or both,  either way just ignore him.
 
2013-02-17 01:39:46 PM  
Welcome to Obama's america. I blame Bush!
 
2013-02-17 01:43:42 PM  

Contents Under Pressure: My house is almost paid off. I'll sell it and move in with my relatives before I'd pick garbage to make ends meet.


/shrug

Some would say the same about wearing a suit and tie and being stuck inside a farking office building every g'damn day.

More power to em' I say.
 
2013-02-17 01:44:42 PM  

lasercannon: unyon: gingerjet: Thankfully I live in an apartment building that locks up the garbage and recycling containers indoors and doesn't have a porter to bribe.

I have to ask- Why does it matter?  Regardless of how recycling gets to depot, isn't it mission accomplished from your perspective?

He is is possibly a ginger or a troll or both,  either way just ignore him.


It's so good that we have someone to tell us which ideas to consider and which to ignore.  Try contributing something useful to the thread instead of simplistic characterizations.  The core point is accurate, while slightly off-topic.
 
2013-02-17 01:52:24 PM  

wildcardjack: At least you have deposit redemption to work with. Here in Texas there are people fishing for the cans for weight value and it's about 30 cans to the pound.


Wow, that's pretty bad, and hardly seems worth it.
Just for the heck of it, I looked it up and there are about 33 cans per pound.
Scrap aluminum is about 50 cents a pound, so in order to make one dollar, you would have to find 66 cans, as opposed to 20 cans in NYC.

Even at 5 cents per can, it's not worth it.
The article says she works 8 hours to make $40, and that's probably not consistent.
There's no way I'm going to rummage through filthy disgusting garbage cans for $5 an hour, no less in Texas, where it works out to about $1.60 an hour.
 
2013-02-17 01:53:35 PM  
If we're going to raise minimum wage by $2/hr, we need to determine the rate of income the average, able-bodied homeless person generates via bottle deposits, and increase the deposit amount proportionately.

Think of the economic impact!  Bush's debts will finally be erased and we'll be back on track to prosperity!
 
2013-02-17 01:55:18 PM  
I have a friend who makes his living doing this and cleaning the lobbies of a few apt complexes. He has some bone disorder i can't recall the name of, so he gets a stipend from the gov't and supplements his income this way. His apt smells though :(
 
2013-02-17 01:57:13 PM  

Contents Under Pressure: My house is almost paid off. I'll sell it and move in with my relatives before I'd pick garbage to make ends meet.


i've done it. no big deal. good exercise walking down the street grabbing cans off the side of the road. course i live in rural georgia so i don't actually dig through garbage.
 
2013-02-17 02:00:00 PM  
At work we go through hundreds of water bottles (Thanks OSHA!) and we usually bag them up and leave them for the little old Asian lady that comes by everyday searching the nearby park for returnables.   At least we know those won't end up in a landfill.
 
2013-02-17 02:06:32 PM  
I told my sis she needed to find a job - any job - by the end of the month or the cigarette fairy just might quit visiting her. I also suggested buying her own cigarettes by collecting cans, just in case she didn't or couldn't find a job. I guess I'll have to try and find this documentary for her so she can get tips from the pros.

/also thinks it sounds interesting
 
2013-02-17 02:08:55 PM  
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fazZwSyC0eM   Only in NYC, rollerblade recycling.
 
2013-02-17 02:09:35 PM  
Arbeit macht frei!

/got nuthin'
 
2013-02-17 02:12:58 PM  
I used to pick up cans in my neighborhood, because if I didn't, no one would. My neighbors were mostly soldiers and college student who had huge parties and never picked up one bit. In the summer, it smelled so nasty if it wasn't policed up twice a week. Now I live in a neighborhood with nice people who don't trash the place. Plus we have curbside recycling. It's so rare as to be comment worthy if there is any litter on the ground.

fark Kansas, that filthy hive of villainy.
 
2013-02-17 02:15:01 PM  

offacue: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fazZwSyC0eM   Only in NYC, rollerblade recycling.


Step aside! Make way, 7 dollars comin' through here, 7 dollars comin' through!
 
2013-02-17 02:17:13 PM  
When I was in HS I wanted a silver show bridle for my horse. I could afford the leather bridle, but not the silver decoration. So I rigged a spear and bag, and rode my horse all over, picking up cans and bottles to pay for the silver. My Mom said our garage smelled like a brewery.

/csb
 
2013-02-17 02:18:18 PM  
There's no deposit on cans and bottles in PA, but scrappers are always out and about on trash night, picking up any piece of metal they can find. And since I live in upper-middle-class suburbia, people are always tossing away everything from bed frames to dryers that probably only need a new belt (I see tons of people selling multiple 'used' appliances on Craigslist around my area too). All I say is, good for them. Less labor and cost for the trash haulers, and someone who couldn't afford a brand new appliance can now get one that probably wasn't that old to begin with.
\Would probably do the same if I had a pick-up truck
 
2013-02-17 02:32:45 PM  

unyon: I have to ask- Why does it matter? Regardless of how recycling gets to depot, isn't it mission accomplished from your perspective?


They often make a mess of the area. Some of them just rip the trash apart and it falls allover the streets. Besides the fact if you are on a lower floor (like I am) you can hear the rattling of cans and moving of large garbage bags for hours a night, depending on how many people stop by. Oh, and tmany steal shopping carts to carry the bottles. In the morning you wake up and in front of your building there are like 3 shopping carts locked to a tree. My super always cuts the locks and throws them out. It's honestly an immigrant thing I think.

There's a lot of this in my area. The elderly immigrants and mothers tend to do it most often. I wouldn't mind if they just did it during day hours and kep our streets clean but they all too often don't. I give them credit for the work though.
 
2013-02-17 02:36:40 PM  

MBZ321: There's no deposit on cans and bottles in PA, but scrappers are always out and about on trash night, picking up any piece of metal they can find. And since I live in upper-middle-class suburbia, people are always tossing away everything from bed frames to dryers that probably only need a new belt (I see tons of people selling multiple 'used' appliances on Craigslist around my area too). All I say is, good for them. Less labor and cost for the trash haulers, and someone who couldn't afford a brand new appliance can now get one that probably wasn't that old to begin with.
\Would probably do the same if I had a pick-up truck


Our neighbors were like yours with the throwing away EVERYTHING. Their stuff was crap, though. Every now and then, though, they'd throw away big chunks of heavy aluminum, such as cookware or furniture items. That became rarer as time went on. Now that 1980s shiat is "vintage," most throwaway cookware and furniture is junk metal if it's metal at all. I kind of pitied the pickup truck scroungers, who were burning gas looking for metal, when in fact most of the shiat thrown out was newer refrigerators and microwaves that are hard to scrap. We did make some guys' day when we flagged them down and offered them a backbreaking  1949 stove. We had exhausted every avenue to find the necessary part. It was hard to just throw it away, literally and figuratively, but for their work, they got a few bucks.
 
2013-02-17 02:50:30 PM  
Pity when they come across one of my pee bottles.
 
2013-02-17 02:51:31 PM  
I'm in Texas, we don't do deposits.

I've never seen a "redemption machine", I'm trying to picture how this would work... I mean, the cans are bulky, and often dented or squished.  So is there a magic label or something on there or does it just scan the UPC?  Does it accept out-of-state cans?  Does it crush them internally?
 
2013-02-17 02:52:47 PM  

Iron Felix: Pity when they come across one of my pee bottles.


Trust me, it doesn't bother them.  They've gladly taken worse.
 
2013-02-17 02:53:27 PM  

unyon: I have to ask- Why does it matter? Regardless of how recycling gets to depot, isn't it mission accomplished from your perspective?


Aluminum pays for urban recycling programs.  Everything else costs money to recycle.  So the "can collectors" make it that much harder for cities to pay for recycling programs.
 
2013-02-17 03:03:15 PM  

Dwight_Yeast: unyon: I have to ask- Why does it matter? Regardless of how recycling gets to depot, isn't it mission accomplished from your perspective?

Aluminum pays for urban recycling programs.  Everything else costs money to recycle.  So the "can collectors" make it that much harder for cities to pay for recycling programs.


Wrong. Plastic is nearly half the value of aluminum, around $600/ton.
 
2013-02-17 03:03:41 PM  
When I was a kid I would find and return soda bottles at 2-cents each. The grocery store I returned them to would take the bottles and put them out in back. Then I got the bright idea of just going to the back of the store to "collect" my bottles. This worked out great for about a year.......I always had a little extra spending money. Then a neighbor friend of my mom's so me doing this. That was the end of my cash cow. Those were the good old days!
 
2013-02-17 03:12:37 PM  

unyon: gingerjet: Thankfully I live in an apartment building that locks up the garbage and recycling containers indoors and doesn't have a porter to bribe.

I have to ask- Why does it matter?  Regardless of how recycling gets to depot, isn't it mission accomplished from your perspective?


That depends, the local recycling company is going bankrupt because there is never any "valuable" stuff in the collected bins, because the scavengers come and take everything even remotely metal or plastic.  So no, it's not all the same.  It means I pay nearly double for garbage service (combined) than I would if the scavengers stopped stealing materials from the bins.  (yes, it's stealing)

They don't come on my property anymore.  But they don't seem to have any problem trespassing to get what they want.  They just learned that my yard isn't worth the problems that come with it.
 
2013-02-17 03:14:04 PM  
This article reminds me of a situation on my campus. Our college doesn't have specific receptacles for recycling, so everything goes in the same garbage cans. There's a guy who is on campus all the time going through all the garbage cans pulling recyclables. Our administration wanted him gone, so they told him he couldn't spend all day on campus unless he was a student. He responded by enrolling in a one unit PE course each semester. The administration responded last semester by slapping stickers on all of the trash cans stating that the garbage in the cans was property of the college and not to be removed from campus by the public. I haven't seen him around campus this semester, so maybe the implied threat of arrest drove him off. I've polled my students about him and a slight majority seem to be pro recycling dude, even after they learn that our campus gets a break on their waste disposal costs because the company that hauls it off campus gets to make money on the recycling.
 
2013-02-17 03:32:19 PM  
FTFA: "Something has happened here in America when a peasant in Guatemala realizes that his life is better on a mountain top in Central America than in central Brooklyn," Alpert says. "

I think life on a mountaintop in Central America has ALWAYS been better than central Brooklyn.  Especially now because hipsters.
 
2013-02-17 03:38:14 PM  

Oznog: I'm in Texas, we don't do deposits.

I've never seen a "redemption machine", I'm trying to picture how this would work... I mean, the cans are bulky, and often dented or squished.  So is there a magic label or something on there or does it just scan the UPC?  Does it accept out-of-state cans?  Does it crush them internally?


They scan the UPC, which determines the can's eligibility, if it's a non deposit can, it spits it back out.
If the can is accepted, the machine crushes it, and it drops into a plastic bin, which is periodically emptied into a dedicated dumpster, that is then brought to the recycling facility.
Same thing applies for plastic, and glass.

When you are done feeding the machine, it spits out a redeemable receipt which is brought to the cashier, or sometimes deposited into nearby collection jar for various charities.

Refillable bottles are dealt with by a clerk.
 
2013-02-17 03:39:12 PM  
You can thank Michigan for the rise of Bottle Bills, which turned our state from a can and bottle-littered mess to a nice, somewhat-clean place to live. Our rivers and lakes improved rapidly. You can walk through a parking lot and not see a single can or bottle.

Last time I was in Ohio, I was amazed by the sea of cans and bottles laying on the ground in Cedar Point's parking lot. If they were deposit-legal, I'd have been looking at hundred of dollars in deposit. Instead, they were dropped there and forgotten, because so many people are pigs if you don't pay them to do the right thing.

Michigan gives ten cents per deposit. I think every state should at least do that much. Five cents is kind of cheap. Paying by weight is ridiculous.
 
2013-02-17 03:49:55 PM  

Oznog: I'm in Texas, we don't do deposits.

I've never seen a "redemption machine", I'm trying to picture how this would work... I mean, the cans are bulky, and often dented or squished.  So is there a magic label or something on there or does it just scan the UPC?  Does it accept out-of-state cans?  Does it crush them internally?


They're usually embedded in a wall or bank of machines. There's a hole in the front. You place your can or plastic bottle in them, on a little treadmill, and the machine spins the can/bottle while pointing a laser at it. When it finds the UPC and scans it, recognizing that it's an item the store sells and it's from this state, it rolls the can to the side into a bin where they're all crushed just before falling in. The whole bin gets compacted occasionally, and a worker has to empty the bins every once in a while.

It's illegal to return an out-of-state can/bottle for deposit. Some machines used to let you get away with it, but that is changing. If they catch you it's a pretty hefty fine. If it's just one can, they'll assume you made a mistake, but if you bring in a bag full of cans from Ohio to a machine in Michigan, they'll either reject them outright, or catch you eventually and report you.

www.findingdulcinea.com

When you're done with all your cans and bottles, you press the little button and a paper receipt comes out. You take the receipt to the customer service desk or cashiers, and they treat it like money.

The LCD screen tells you your total, and the machine's status. For example, if it gets full it will make an annoying, repeating beep and flash "BIN FULL" until someone shows up to swap bins.
 
2013-02-17 03:50:07 PM  

Kahabut: hat depends, the local recycling company is going bankrupt because there is never any "valuable" stuff in the collected bins, because the scavengers come and take everything even remotely metal or plastic.  So no, it's not all the same.  It means I pay nearly double for garbage service (combined) than I would if the scavengers stopped stealing materials from the bins.  (yes, it's stealing)

They don't come on my property anymore.  But they don't seem to have any problem trespassing to get what they want.  They just learned that my yard isn't worth the problems that come with it.


I guess I look at it the other way.  You also didn't pay for the volume of that scrap to be picked up or transported.

Going to the effort of collecting scrap is self employment, as far as I'm concerned.  Trespassing is another story, provided that you don't consider going through a plastic bin in a public laneway trespassing.  I'd much sooner that people took every last morsel of value out of my trash than have them break into my shiat.
 
2013-02-17 03:52:01 PM  
Oh, and if the can's dented/squished, the machines will work only if they can read the UPC. Sometimes, you need to pop the can/bottle back out so the machine can read it.

And yes, you could probably print a bunch of barcodes and slap them on bottles or cans, and get a deposit illegally, but again-- if they catch you, they're pretty serious about it. Major fine, at least. Jail time, if they see a conspiracy to defraud the store.
 
2013-02-17 04:18:45 PM  
1) If recycling a material loses money, its not creating any value, but destroying value. Destroying value is not a good idea. See cash for clunkers, guaranteeing Fannie and Freddie bonds, or the Soviet Union.
2) The amount of aluminum being recycled over the years has fallen...due to manufacturers learning how to make thinner and thinner cans. This is the best way to "recycle."
3) I cannot believe a state invested money in "recycling ATMs". There must have been some amazing kick backs for that.
4) Old crazy guys getting your cans out of your trash is annoying, but it gives them a job. A job without any strict schedule or dress code. Which pretty much fits their lifestyle.
5) In California, if you bring in say 10 kg of pure aluminum parts you don't need, they demand you also have a soda can. Because recycling must mean drink cans.
6) Instead of bottle and can deposits, they should simply pay a higher price per pound and subsidize it that way. (I suspect the above is exactly that, but why demand a soda can?)
 
2013-02-17 04:24:46 PM  
Bottle deposits are all mob controlled in RI, CT, NY and NJ. Any all-cash business is a great way to launder money.  I was told by an industry insider that a cool startup called Clynk that does returnable bottles a lot better up here in northern New Hampshire tried to expand down into that area and was basically told to "go fark yourselves" by the mob.
 
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