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(Telegraph)   Scientists create a sixth sense. Seeing dead people not included   (telegraph.co.uk) divider line 30
    More: Cool, scientists create, visual cortex, prosthetic devices, infrared, implants, ultraviolet light, infrared camera  
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3745 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Feb 2013 at 12:57 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-17 12:58:39 PM  
My vision is augmented.
 
2013-02-17 01:03:06 PM  
usrbin.info

Unimpressed
 
2013-02-17 01:03:11 PM  
How is this a "sixth sense"? Unaugmented humans have more than 5 senses (beyond the 5 in school there's sense of balance, detected by stuff in the ear, and sense of where the parts of your body are, I think. And probably more that I don't know about). So this might be an additional sense, but it's certainly not the 6th.
 
2013-02-17 01:09:20 PM  
I wonder how long it will be before the general public gets past the false idea that we have five senses. It's so ingrained, like the old ideas of four elements making up everything. And it's just as blatantly wrong.
 
2013-02-17 01:10:44 PM  
My skin detects infrared already.
 
2013-02-17 01:16:56 PM  

Colour_out_of_Space: My skin detects infrared already.


Was going to say this.

Being able to see extra visual spectra would be neat, but only if you could turn it off at will.
 
2013-02-17 01:17:13 PM  
Augmenting one sense is not the same as making a new sense.

encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
The electromagnetic spectrum, how does it work.
 
2013-02-17 01:28:55 PM  
This business will get out of control. It will get out of control and we'll be lucky to live through it.
 
2013-02-17 01:35:26 PM  
3.bp.blogspot.com
Wanted to take payment on a royalty check

/ Also "feeling" not "seeing," and as has been said, "augmenting" not "creating"

// Also dozens of other senses already identified

/// Also also also

//// Still applaudable
 
2013-02-17 01:35:39 PM  

Sgeo: How is this a "sixth sense"? Unaugmented humans have more than 5 senses (beyond the 5 in school there's sense of balance, detected by stuff in the ear, and sense of where the parts of your body are, I think. And probably more that I don't know about). So this might be an additional sense, but it's certainly not the 6th.


Balance amounts to the brain processing a sense of touch, so not an extra sense.

IR vision would not be an extra sense, as we already see light, it would be merely an extension of the same sense, even though it is from a different aparatus.

Colour_out_of_Space: My skin detects infrared already.


You feel the repercussions of it(warmth from radiation dispersing it's energy) by proxy, but it s not detected in the same sense as the other senses, which is a unique receptive system.

largedon: Augmenting one sense is not the same as making a new sense.

[encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com image 350x144]
The electromagnetic spectrum, how does it work.


This.
 
2013-02-17 01:38:31 PM  

Khellendros: I wonder how long it will be before the general public gets past the false idea that we have five senses. It's so ingrained, like the old ideas of four elements making up everything. And it's just as blatantly wrong.


But The Philosopher said there were five senses!  You can't question The Philosopher.

/unless you're a brilliant, rich, bratty Italian
 
2013-02-17 01:43:45 PM  
What I found most startling from the article is that adding infrared sensors to the mice made them sensitive to ultraviolet light.
 
2013-02-17 02:02:30 PM  
Sense of gravity or acceleration might be a better word than balance. Normally it's just to sense which way is down, or if you're spinning or otherwise moving.

Sense of temperature is also an easy one to include.

Humans also can see faintly see polarization, but I guess that gets lumped in with sight.
 
2013-02-17 02:12:48 PM  

ItHurtsWhenIDoThis: Sense of gravity or acceleration might be a better word than balance. Normally it's just to sense which way is down, or if you're spinning or otherwise moving.

Sense of temperature is also an easy one to include.

Humans also can see faintly see polarization, but I guess that gets lumped in with sight.


Sense of balance is really just a specialization of the sense of touch anyway, no?
 
2013-02-17 02:44:15 PM  

RatOmeter: What I found most startling from the article is that adding infrared sensors to the mice made them sensitive to ultraviolet light.


I detect an episode of editorial stupidity.
 
2013-02-17 03:06:41 PM  
Prepare for Smission.
 
2013-02-17 03:32:35 PM  
We have the technology ...
 
2013-02-17 03:51:17 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: ItHurtsWhenIDoThis: Sense of gravity or acceleration might be a better word than balance. Normally it's just to sense which way is down, or if you're spinning or otherwise moving.

Sense of temperature is also an easy one to include.

Humans also can see faintly see polarization, but I guess that gets lumped in with sight.

Sense of balance is really just a specialization of the sense of touch anyway, no?


The sense of touch is controlled by the inner ear?
 
2013-02-17 04:31:53 PM  

Atillathepun: ArcadianRefugee: ItHurtsWhenIDoThis: Sense of gravity or acceleration might be a better word than balance. Normally it's just to sense which way is down, or if you're spinning or otherwise moving.

Sense of temperature is also an easy one to include.

Humans also can see faintly see polarization, but I guess that gets lumped in with sight.

Sense of balance is really just a specialization of the sense of touch anyway, no?

The sense of touch is controlled by the inner ear?


encrypted-tbn1.gstatic.com
 
2013-02-17 06:15:19 PM  

SpdrJay: This business will get out of control. It will get out of control and we'll be lucky to live through it.


No, we won't live through it. What will come out the other side 1000 years from now is something today we either simply would not recognize or if we did recognize it we would look upon with undisguised horror.

Because the point is not whether you or I or even humanity lives but whether life itself conquerors the stars. That is going to happen. One day. And we all will have been a part of it.

/caught reference but decided to be serious.
 
2013-02-17 06:15:39 PM  

Sgeo: How is this a "sixth sense"? Unaugmented humans have more than 5 senses (beyond the 5 in school there's sense of balance, detected by stuff in the ear, and sense of where the parts of your body are, I think. And probably more that I don't know about). So this might be an additional sense, but it's certainly not the 6th.


And now here's Yakko, Wakko and Dot to list all the senses.
 
2013-02-17 07:55:49 PM  
Are they sure it's infrared and not octarine?
 
2013-02-17 08:06:22 PM  

omeganuepsilon: Balance amounts to the brain processing a sense of touch, so not an extra sense.


Uhhh no, not exactly, unless you are calling any "mechanoreception" as sense of touch, in which case you'd also have to include hearing (and taste).

Balance/body position (whether you want to count them together or separate) are as clear a sense as any of the others, all of which except sight and smell, are combination of various types of reception processed in a certain way in the brain. Sound is mechanoreception. Balance/body position is mechanoreception with a healthy amount of photoreception (balance combines with sight). Touch is thermoreception, mechanoreception, and nociception (pain). Taste is thermoreception, chemoreception (both in the tongue and olfactory), mechanoreception, and nociception.

We don't really have as clearly delineated senses as we've always been taught. There is significant overlap as all of the data is integrated in the brain (not to mention unconscious "senses" that regulate body balance: measuring blood pH, osmotic balance, etc). But if you want to say we have clear senses, then balance/body position deserves to be one as much as any of the others.
 
2013-02-17 08:35:24 PM  

Atillathepun: ArcadianRefugee: ItHurtsWhenIDoThis: Sense of gravity or acceleration might be a better word than balance. Normally it's just to sense which way is down, or if you're spinning or otherwise moving.

Sense of temperature is also an easy one to include.

Humans also can see faintly see polarization, but I guess that gets lumped in with sight.

Sense of balance is really just a specialization of the sense of touch anyway, no?

The sense of touch is controlled by the inner ear?


The inner ear employs the sense of touch.
 
2013-02-17 09:11:18 PM  

mamoru: But if you want to say we have clear senses, then balance/body position deserves to be one as much as any of the others.


Arbitrary opinion is arbitrary.

mamoru: Uhhh no, not exactly, unless you are calling any "mechanoreception" as sense of touch, in which case you'd also have to include hearing (and taste)


Not so much taste. Has little to do with physical force, and more to do with detection of a chemical.

Here's my take. Likewise arbitrary, but with distinction.

1.
Vision (electromagnetic reception)

2 & 3  Smell and taste have some similar mechanics have some overlaps in reception(in the brain and the receptors), but can do distinctly different things with different compounds, or rather, sense them via different means.  There is a third system in us, but it is dormant or inert, for lack of a better word,pheromone detection.  Between the three, there are two unique functions in most mammals.  IE(from a wiki, so take it for what that's worth)
Volatile small molecule odorants, non-volatile proteins, and non-volatile hydrocarbons may all produce olfactory sensations. Some animal species are able to smell carbon dioxide in minute concentrations. Taste sensations are caused by small organic molecules and proteins.

4. Touch (to include hearing and "balance"  Balance/motion/ is a function of the brain and does not have a unique external stimuli, vision only ties in at the brain end, IIRC balance is a direct "touch" in some creatures, is it lobsters that have a cavity that amounts to a mercury switch by having a pebble in it?.  Also includes body position and hearing)

5. Temperature. (temperature energy is not the same as IR, contrary to the belief of some, it is direct transfer of energy as where light is a transformation of energy on each end, we don't "feel" the light, we feel it's energy disperse)

But, that's just like, my opinion man.
 
2013-02-17 09:45:35 PM  

omeganuepsilon: mamoru: But if you want to say we have clear senses, then balance/body position deserves to be one as much as any of the others.

Arbitrary opinion is arbitrary.

mamoru: Uhhh no, not exactly, unless you are calling any "mechanoreception" as sense of touch, in which case you'd also have to include hearing (and taste)

Not so much taste. Has little to do with physical force, and more to do with detection of a chemical.

Here's my take. Likewise arbitrary, but with distinction.

1.
Vision (electromagnetic reception)

2 & 3  Smell and taste have some similar mechanics have some overlaps in reception(in the brain and the receptors), but can do distinctly different things with different compounds, or rather, sense them via different means.  There is a third system in us, but it is dormant or inert, for lack of a better word,pheromone detection.  Between the three, there are two unique functions in most mammals.  IE(from a wiki, so take it for what that's worth)
Volatile small molecule odorants, non-volatile proteins, and non-volatile hydrocarbons may all produce olfactory sensations. Some animal species are able to smell carbon dioxide in minute concentrations. Taste sensations are caused by small organic molecules and proteins.

4. Touch (to include hearing and "balance"  Balance/motion/ is a function of the brain and does not have a unique external stimuli, vision only ties in at the brain end, IIRC balance is a direct "touch" in some creatures, is it lobsters that have a cavity that amounts to a mercury switch by having a pebble in it?.  Also includes body position and hearing)

5. Temperature. (temperature energy is not the same as IR, contrary to the belief of some, it is direct transfer of energy as where light is a transformation of energy on each end, we don't "feel" the light, we feel it's energy disperse)

But, that's just like, my opinion man.


Chemoception is a huge class of different receptors feeding into the central nervous input. They are not all or even mostly related, biologically, evolutionarily, or chemically. So to be fair, there are thousands of chemosenses, including the five taste (sour, sweet, bitter, salty, and umami), the thousands of related smells, the senses of various pains (nociception), nausea, hunger, blood sugar, and a number of other regulatory pathways that have direct central innervation. Mechanoception has various forms which also include nociception unrelated to the evolutionary detection of pressure. There are typically four different electromagnetism detection senses in the eyes of humans, along with a number of related receptors throughout the body.

Five isn't even correct if you use gross evolution, and should never be seriously taught.
 
2013-02-17 11:27:03 PM  

ex0du5: Five isn't even correct if you use gross evolution, and should never be seriously taught.


Right, because we should all be biology experts on top of our day jobs.
 
2013-02-17 11:39:25 PM  
shiat, I've had infravision since D&D 1e.
 
2013-02-17 11:46:32 PM  

ex0du5: Five isn't even correct if you use gross evolution, and should never be seriously taught.


While 5 isn't exactly correct, it is kind of useful for breaking things down about how we perceive and interact with the world. The problem with how it's taught, apparently, is that people seem to come away with the idea that there are only 5 senses, and they are completely distinct things, rather than what they actually are: combinations of receptor types combined with regions of the brain evolved to process signals coming in from those specific nerves.

I generally break down the "5 senses" + balance/body position/self after I have taught the main general classes of sensory receptors (photo-, chemo-, mechano-, thermo-, noci-, and electro-, for those of you following along at home). This seems to work two ways: 1.) they have already been bombarded with the idea of only 5 senses, so that acts as a lead in, and 2.) by showing how much overlap there is and the basic ideas of it's the signal being processed, not the physical stimulus itself (i.e. if you sent the optic nerve to the olfactory region of the brain and wired it up as close as you can to the connections from the nose, then photostimuli would be perceived as smells, probably with no discernible patterns because the olfactory region never evolved to process visual information).

But yeah, the idea of there only being 5 senses is pretty much a big fat lie, and generally hinders things when it comes time to learn how sensory reception and perception work in biology class.

omeganuepsilon: ex0du5: Five isn't even correct if you use gross evolution, and should never be seriously taught.

Right, because we should all be biology experts on top of our day jobs.


No, but it might just be worth listening to the experts when they weigh in.

/biology teacher
 
2013-02-18 12:14:40 AM  

mamoru: No, but it might just be worth listening to the experts when they weigh in.


sure, but....

mamoru: While 5 isn't exactly correct, it is kind of useful for breaking things down about how we perceive and interact with the world.


For the vast majority, that is good enough.  IMO the way I split it up allows for a touch more accuracy without over-complicating the whole mess.  I still move that balance is a brain activity and not an external stimuli, which is what the 5 list is more concerned with.

In all honesty I fudged it some.  I prefer the stimulous modality for the breakdown for the unwashed masses.  It's limited at 6 so it's not too complicated for plebes, and ties in with the other sciences.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stimulus_modality

mamoru: then photostimuli would be perceived as smells, probably with no discernible patterns because the olfactory region never evolved to process visual information


The brain is a marvelously adaptable thing.  Granted you don't specifically state the brain can't adapt, but you do make it sound as if it's an impossibility.

Ala FTA:

In the first study, rats wore an infrared detector on their head which was connected to electrodes in the part of their brain which governs touch.

When one of three ultraviolet light sources in their cage was switched on, the rats initially began rubbing their whiskers, indicating that they felt as if they were touching the invisible light.

After a month of training, they learned to link the new sensation with the light sources and were able to find which one was switched on with 100 per cent accuracy. A monkey has since been taught to perform the same task.


Even more, The brain has been known to re-learn or even re-organize how input is analyzed or memories are stored. A very magnificent thing, that.

At any rate, I probably won't even see a reply if you make one, long work week and I don't think I'll be taking the laptop.
 
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