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(NPR)   Can you learn to like music you hate? Sorry, NPR, I'm not a Belieber   (npr.org) divider line 22
    More: Unlikely, traditional music, Sounds Good  
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3747 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Feb 2013 at 11:42 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2013-02-17 11:51:27 AM  
2 votes:
...or as Douglas Adams put it...

"1) everything that's already in the world when you're born is just normal;
2) anything that gets invented between then and before you turn thirty is incredibly exciting and creative and with any luck you can make a career out of it;
3) anything that gets invented after you're thirty is against the natural order of things and the beginning of the end of civilisation as we know it until it's been around for about ten years when it gradually turns out to be alright really.
Apply this list to movies, rock music, word processors and mobile phones to work out how old you are."
2013-02-17 11:37:51 AM  
2 votes:

John Buck 41: Seems like a silly question. This may be an apples/oranges angle (actually music/food) but if I eat something that doesn't taste good, why try it again? I know what I like/don't like. Same for a shiatty movie or poorly written book. Why watch/read it again?


There's a thing called "acquired taste" that shoots all kinds of holes in your theory. I didn't like spinach the first 50 times I tried it but now I think it's delicious.
2013-02-17 11:30:02 AM  
2 votes:

Somacandra: jake_lex: I think this is very true of "avant-garde" music: I mean, the first time I heard some of Schoenberg's twelve-tone stuff, it just sounded like noise to me. Then I learned a little music theory, and at least I knew what it was trying to do.


[upload.wikimedia.org image 300x300]

Okay...here is the most difficult stuff I've ever learned to appreciate (on an intellectual level only).


This, much more so than any silly 'she broke up the Beatles' argument, is why she is mocked and scorned.
2013-02-17 08:16:21 PM  
1 votes:

t3knomanser: ciberido: If we're just going for the "freaky music" category,

That's not bad, or anything, but it still has a beat and notes. I certainly wouldn't call that "freaky", it's basic darkwave/downtempo EBM. Is downtempo EBM a thing? It should be.


Fine, fine, time to break out the Tuvan throat singing, I see.
2013-02-17 05:20:44 PM  
1 votes:

Mad_Radhu: Frankenstorm: I grew up with Michael Jackson thrown in my face. I still don't like his music. Even the songs of his I kind of like I really don't like.

Same here. His music just hasn't aged that well to me. I find Prince's music of the 80s and 90s much more appealing. It just speaks to me in a way that MJ never did. Nothing MJ ever did comes close to the perfect beauty of Purple Rain.


I didn't always love Prince, but I always appreciated his music. He's put out some great music.
2013-02-17 05:11:00 PM  
1 votes:
Sorry Hipsters, but saying it's a "Post Hip Hop Metal Quadraphonic New Age Revival" band won't get me to listen to something that sounds like an elephant raping a cat!

/seriously though, I do have a personal rule that "Even if I don't like the band, if I like the song, than I like the song."
//it has to be LISTENABLE though!
///that rule will backfire on me one day if I find a boy band song I like!
2013-02-17 01:55:14 PM  
1 votes:

John Buck 41: jaylectricity: John Buck 41: jaylectricity: John Buck 41: Seems like a silly question. This may be an apples/oranges angle (actually music/food) but if I eat something that doesn't taste good, why try it again? I know what I like/don't like. Same for a shiatty movie or poorly written book. Why watch/read it again?

There's a thing called "acquired taste" that shoots all kinds of holes in your theory. I didn't like spinach the first 50 times I tried it but now I think it's delicious.

You're right. The first 50 times I put my fingers under a rocking chair and rocked, it sucked. But now I think it feels great.

Listening to music and eating spinach don't cause injuries.

What injuries? I didn't break or bruise my fingers. It just hurt. Like asparagus, brussel sprouts, parsnips, sweet potatoes, and blue cheese dressing hurt my taste buds. Or hurt the way shiatty music hurts my ears. No 'injuries', just an unpleasant sensation that I choose not to repeat.


Listen, if you wanna live the rest of your life eating chicken nuggets and pizza, be my guest. Some things take time to appreciate.

You'll never learn to play guitar very well.
2013-02-17 01:54:59 PM  
1 votes:

12349876: dopekitty74: It's disturbing how whenever i'm exposed to One Direction, I find myself headbobbing or tapping along with it, i do NOT like that shiat, but it's catchy....

This comment reminds me of the other thing you have to remember with music is the cultural/peer pressure that also plays a big role in liking or not liking something for certain people and joining or leaving certain influences could certainly help someone learn to like something.  I'll admit One Direction and Beiber and the like are catchy tunes and have good beats for dancing, but to me, it's bland and unimaginative, the lyrics are basic and juvenile, and there's no emotional impact.


I think that's the biggest issue with me. I have always viewed music as a way to communicate something and honestly that stuff just doesn't communicate anything. The music itself is bland with no emotional impact and the lyrics are just vague generalities with no real direction or anything meaningful to say. I'm not saying that it needs to be serious or come right out and state what the artist is trying to do, not at all. Some of the best music out there is open to interpretation and inspires people in different ways. But with Beiber and One Direction there just...isn't anything there. Its not just them, that's generally my complaint about most "popular" music be it rap, country, rock, etc. I can't stand empty crap that was just churned out so the artist could get a few more royalty checks. I need a connection to enjoy the music. Of course I could just be weird.
2013-02-17 01:46:41 PM  
1 votes:

Somacandra: jake_lex: I think this is very true of "avant-garde" music: I mean, the first time I heard some of Schoenberg's twelve-tone stuff, it just sounded like noise to me. Then I learned a little music theory, and at least I knew what it was trying to do.


[upload.wikimedia.org image 300x300]

Okay...here is the most difficult stuff I've ever learned to appreciate (on an intellectual level only).

Have at it.


I tried. I really did. But I am almost over that headache, so...

i45.tinypic.com
Tapiola, a tone poem by Jean Sibelius, isn't quite as challenging as, um, whatever drug-induced noise/music Yoko Ono was attempting there, but it still takes some getting used to. Worth it, though.
2013-02-17 01:44:52 PM  
1 votes:

jaylectricity: John Buck 41: Seems like a silly question. This may be an apples/oranges angle (actually music/food) but if I eat something that doesn't taste good, why try it again? I know what I like/don't like. Same for a shiatty movie or poorly written book. Why watch/read it again?

There's a thing called "acquired taste" that shoots all kinds of holes in your theory. I didn't like spinach the first 50 times I tried it but now I think it's delicious.


Here's a better analogy: I didn't like Brussels sprouts (rap) because it was often served to me over-boiled, mushy and tasteless (Vanilla Ice, MC Hammer) but after I had them roasted with bacon (Eminem, Jay-Z), I really like them now.
2013-02-17 12:59:42 PM  
1 votes:
I grew up with Michael Jackson thrown in my face. I still don't like his music. Even the songs of his I kind of like I really don't like.
2013-02-17 12:43:18 PM  
1 votes:
It's disturbing how whenever i'm exposed to One Direction, I find myself headbobbing or tapping along with it, i do NOT like that shiat, but it's catchy....
2013-02-17 12:05:29 PM  
1 votes:
If you've never smoked weed, smoke some and you'll enjoy music you otherwise may not have.  My 74 year old dad has been a huge jazz fan all his life and I think he'd do himself a great service if he smoked up and listened to all his albums again.

/i realize that's two different points
2013-02-17 11:56:48 AM  
1 votes:
Not when I don't consider the subject a form of music.

I'm looking right at you "gangsta" rap.
2013-02-17 11:55:52 AM  
1 votes:

John Buck 41: Seems like a silly question. This may be an apples/oranges angle (actually music/food) but if I eat something that doesn't taste good, why try it again? I know what I like/don't like. Same for a shiatty movie or poorly written book. Why watch/read it again?


I think when most of us taste beer as a kid the first time we are not too enamored to it, but then strangely enough we grow up and it becomes awesome.
2013-02-17 11:48:34 AM  
1 votes:
Most of us never move on from whatever music we liked at age 14 - 16.

Others keep our minds open & can enjoy ANY type of music... even stuff that came along after we were 14.
2013-02-17 11:48:20 AM  
1 votes:

jake_lex: I think this is very true of "avant-garde" music: I mean, the first time I heard some of Schoenberg's twelve-tone stuff, it just sounded like noise to me. Then I learned a little music theory, and at least I knew what it was trying to do.

That said, though, I can't say that I "enjoy" that sort of music.  I'm not gonna make a Schoenberg playlist for my iPod for my next road trip.


I didn't care for or appreciate jazz until I learned how to play guitar.
2013-02-17 10:43:43 AM  
1 votes:
Seems like a silly question. This may be an apples/oranges angle (actually music/food) but if I eat something that doesn't taste good, why try it again? I know what I like/don't like. Same for a shiatty movie or poorly written book. Why watch/read it again?
2013-02-17 10:15:38 AM  
1 votes:
I'm a jazz musician and in the course of my education at it, I directly experienced what's described in the article as well as observed it in other people. Seems pretty obvious to me. The whole history of music runs like that, with increasingly rich harmonies becoming more 'acceptable' over time in classical and later jazz music. Back in the 1700s the tritone, now an interval used in almost every tune imaginable (it hangs out in 7th chords among other places) was called 'Satan in music'. Supposedly at one point a few composers who used it in holy music were excommunicated from the church.

WTF Indeed: Considering that the majority of Top 40 today is just sampled techno beats from the 90's with auto-tuned singers laid on top of the electronic noise, I doubt there is anything that resembles harmonies to enjoy much less complex harmonies.


I think we even see it today, just in a different facet of music. That 'electronic noise' you refer to is often in fact a more rich, dissonant individual timbre. That 'wub' bass sound you hear in dubstep which sounds like a single, buzzing, obnoxious tone is in fact a multitude of overtones/harmonics more complex than other timbres we're more accustomed to. It seems to me that since the 50s and Ike Turner we've seen a progression in timbre toward more complex overtones and harmonics, rather than a progression in harmony. It's interesting to think about, anyway.
2013-02-17 10:12:19 AM  
1 votes:
I guess it is possible, I hated Pop music in the 80's but now I enjoy it for the reasons I hated it then, the cheesy feel good vibe.  Inversely, I can barely tolerate much of the Heavy Metal music I listened to in my youth, most of it was shiate.  But, I've never been what anyone would consider a musical connoisseur.
2013-02-17 10:07:37 AM  
1 votes:
I think this is very true of "avant-garde" music: I mean, the first time I heard some of Schoenberg's twelve-tone stuff, it just sounded like noise to me. Then I learned a little music theory, and at least I knew what it was trying to do.

That said, though, I can't say that I "enjoy" that sort of music.  I'm not gonna make a Schoenberg playlist for my iPod for my next road trip.
2013-02-17 09:37:08 AM  
1 votes:
Considering that the majority of Top 40 today is just sampled techno beats from the 90's with auto-tuned singers laid on top of the electronic noise, I doubt there is anything that resembles harmonies to enjoy much less complex harmonies.
 
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